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"Анна работает из дома, поэтому встаёт когда хочет."

Translation:Anna works from home, that's why she gets up when she wants to.

January 2, 2016

56 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielSixs

In English the final 'to' can be left off


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leod120

Yes. Please report!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

DL is wrong in this case. “That’s why” corresponds to the Russian phrases «вот почему» / «именно поэтому». When used alone, «поэтому» corresponds to “so” or “therefore”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wollrich

поэтому = therefore. That really needs to be permitted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wollrich

and "thus" should also be accepted, especially considering the more convoluted options that are okay


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/renatm

How is it even possible to get a typo here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aceman357

Could "поэтому" be translated as "therefore" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

When used alone, «поэтому» translates as “so” or “for that reason” and occasionally as “therefore”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vmar33

In reality ... "embracing and sharing regional language differences" means that THE PROGRAMMERS should respect SOME not the only variant of ... answers, shouldn't they??? ."Laziness leads to poverty..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simon.kinsella

Crikey - I stared at the set of English words offered for the answer and couldn't come up with any viable sentence at all, even though I knew the meaning of the sentence. The solution is not a very natural expression, especially as it requires comas, which are not available in the palette of words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

DL doesn't care about punctuation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ULRICHSCHL4

Why is "is working" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

In the given sentence we are talking about Anna’s long-term status, her habit, if you like, rather than what she is doing at the moment, that’s why.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katya202102

I think "hence she gets up when she wants" is perfectly good.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndroidKanada

I agree, though that is more sophisticated English than would normally be expected. From my limited understanding of the DL marking rules, that would not be a difficult addition - have you reported it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielMil249176

Is it possible to add another "она" after the когда? If i translate the English sentence literally, word for word, it would make sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

In Russian, we never use the same form of any personal pronoun to refer to the same person within one sentence, and tend to avoid using it repeatedly in two sentences in a row. Omission of a subject in a subordinate clause implies that it is the same as in the main clause.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielMil249176

I think I understand, thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil_Stracchino

Can поэтому reasonably be translated as "which is why..." rather than "that's why..."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

Only in the phrase «и поэтому». Without “и” “поэтому” simply means “so”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil_Stracchino

So in this sentence, "that's why" (from the 'official' answer) and "which is why" are actually both wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

They are not wrong: if you stress the word поэтому or say «именно поэтому», «that’s why» will be a perfect match. “Which is why” has a similar meaning, except it adds completely new information: by saying “which is why she gets up when she likes” we say, “by the way, that allows her to get up when she likes”. The best matching Russian phrase I can think of would be «поэтому, кстати». Given that, in Russian, subordinate clauses are always separated from the main one with a comma, the most common way of making a subordinate clause non-restrictive is to insert the word кстати (=by the way) into it. Another way is to start the clause with и: «и это», «и поэтому» etc. Cf.: “He brought me a few books which I like” (Он принёс мне несколько книг, которые мне нравятся) and “He brought me a few books, which I like” (Он принёс мне несколько книг, и это мне нравится).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil_Stracchino

Huh. That is not a distinction which I would think of as being made in English between "that's why" and "which is why". In English they are pretty much interchangeable and both seemed valid ways to translate the Russian, which is why I was puzzled that Duolingo marked "which is why" as wrong. So from your explanation, the Russian sentence here is assuming that we already know that Anna gets up when she likes, and is not introducing that as new information?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

It all depends on the intonation. If we “already know”, then the word поэтому will be accented (the pitch will drop after the stressed э and the remaining part of the clause will be flat). If, however, the description of Ann’s habit is introduced as new information, поэтому will be pronounced without any inflections. The stressed syllable ёт in встаёт will be pronounced at a higher pitch than the preceding one and the following syllables will be pronounced with tones “going down the scale”, that is, the pitch will gradually lower towards the end of the sentence. Many learners wonder how one can specify nouns in a language which has no articles. Well, the only way of doing it is pronouncing them flatly. Any known information must be pronounced monotonously without changing the pitch.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Loo951371

During Coronavirus lockdown 2020 I also share Anna's pattern of working from home and getting up when I want (to)!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/browndom

Wakes up is still appropriate here.


[deactivated user]

    Well, if I understand correctly, 'wake (up)' corresponds to просыпаться, and 'get up' corresponds to 'вставать'. The former means the time when you open your eyes, the latter to the time when you get out of the bed. And while it's probably roughly the same thing for most people, the difference does exist, doesn't it?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

    In Russian we say "работает на дому", not "из дома". It is obviously a word-to-word back translation from the English


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rubella19

    Из дома is perfectly viable variant.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

    To Russian people of my generation - I'm in my 50's now- работает из дома sounds like a very bad Russian, просто издевательство над языком (sheer language corruption). Из дома requires a verb of movement or communication, and anyone who has any sense of good language understands that the phrase cannot possibly collocate with a verb of occupation like работать.


    [deactivated user]

      Из дома requires a verb of movement

      No, it doesn't. «Из» doesn't neccessarily require the verb of movement, it can be used for actions done in one place when results are noticeable in another place. НКРЯ has a example of «Из Вены, цесарского государства, изо Львова пишут» from the early XVIII century. Obviously, people don't move from Vienna when they're writing. They're staying in Vienna, but what they write is to be directed outside.

      In modern Russian, «работать» is one of the verbs that can be used this way: people stay at home, but the results of their work are to be used outside of their home.

      Всякого, кто говорит, что он работает "из дома", я бы просто выгнал из дома и не пускал бы обратно, пока он не научится говорить по-русски правильно.

      I believe this message breaks the Duolingo community guidelines, notably "Embrace and share regional language differences" and "Always be Respectful". If you don't speak this way, it doesn't mean that it's 'incorrect', 'a corruption', «издевательство над языком»; it doesn't mean that people using this phrase should be denied a roof over their heads. Please "Approach these conversations with an open mind and attitude", as the guidelines put it.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bleedingorange

      Is the "дому" after "на" dative or locative?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

      «На дому» is locative. Unlike dative forms ending in «у», in which the stress does not necessarily fall on the ending (e.g. к дОму, по дОму), locative forms in «у» always have the ending stressed. Only a limited number of singular nouns take the у ending in the locative case. All such nouns are masculine and most of them have a one-syllable stem. A few of them have a two-syllable stem. The most common locative phrases with the у ending are на полу, на углу, в углу, на дому (but: в доме), на/в снегу, в лесу, в пылу, в бору, в/на глазу, в/на носу, на ветру, на берегу, в пруду, в тазу. Many such phrases are idioms: на ходу, на бегу, на лету, в ходу, на поводу, на кону, на дому, на своём веку, на виду.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bleedingorange

      Thanks for the detailed reply! But what's the difference between на дому and в доме?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

      “In the house” = в доме

      «На дому» is only used with verbs like работать, трудиться, шить etc. The phrase means “at home” or “from home”.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vmar33

      Well, it's just a bitter shame even ... to read such Duo translation ... ! It's quite possible to say : "Anna rabotaet doma, poetomu ... etc. " Americans can/may work at home ( "Russians" in this case say "Zavtra ya rabotayu doma ") if, for example, a child is sick and the boss permits that, not to mention "Work at home jobs" ... just to maintain work-life and family balance ... The words " ... iz doma ... " , I guess, even degrade and dishonor the Russian language. BTW the second part of the sentence is also ... an absolute casserole of nonsense ... but ... Duo likes such "exclusive" and kind of "true-to-life" (... especially, nowadays ...) expressions ... though ... it depends .... I guess ...


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ionradoi1

      From home is just a literallly translation the right form is at home


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndroidKanada

      Would it be wrong to write ...она встаёт...? It's not accepted (and the report button didn't offer "My answer should be accepted").


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

      Говорите по-русски правильно: «Анна работает дома» или «Анна работает, не выходя из дома» или «Анна работает на дому». Словом (=In other words), говорите ПО-РУССКИ.


      [deactivated user]

        Пожалуйста, не нарушайте правила «Always be Respectful» и «Embrace and share regional language differences».


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

        With all respect to regional language differences and dialects, I don’t think that the phrase «работать из дома» exists in any regional variety of Russian: it was coined quite recently by translating literally from the English and sounds foreign to most Russians.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nadin-317

        Забыли про ударение сказать. А оно разное. Работает дОма и на домУ.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattinMaverick

        What would "working from home" and Работать из дома mean?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil_Stracchino

        If I'm a construction worker, say, I need to be where the construction is being done. If I assemble things in a factory, I have to be in the factory to do it. If I am an emergency room physician, I need to be at the hospital. But I don't do any of these things. I work with computers and databases. And I don't need to be in an office to do that. I can do it all remotely, from my own home, with just a computer and a fast internet connection. I can sit down at my desk and work on a computer on the other side of the world.

        This is what "working from home" means. There are actually a lot of jobs you can do without leaving your home. Another word often used is "telecommuting".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattinMaverick

        Ага хорошо... спасибо Фил.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnthonyC77

        Its bad English to leave a preposition on the end of a sentence without an object of the preposition


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ngfy188911v

        Quarantine addition ??


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenCostell3

        No. It's 4-6 years old.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VvEp7

        It is impossible to hear the difference between анна and она, apart from this word the sentence is exactly the same. It is 50/50 whether you chose the right option, thus I feel that either should be accepted as a correct answer.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trudy664886

        I wrote "that's" and Duolingo gave an alternative answer of "that is", which was not a possible answer given!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guido506552

        All of the proposed translations were new to me: Из дома, на дому, from home ? I spent a lot of time reading all the comments, now I 'v learned a lot, Thank you everybody !


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/r_park

        I wish Duolingo would stick to learning the language at hand — Russian— and leave the English to us, who are mostly native speakers.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenCostell3

        What answer do you think should be accepted that isn't currently?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/r_park

        Anna works from home so she gets up when she wants. That’s what a normal person would say. Not “therefore”or “that’s why.” PS. Thanks for asking.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenCostell3

        I checked, and we do accept that answer, so if it was rejected there's a tiny chance there was a bug with the grading functionality (which does happen on rare occasion), or you made a typo or another small entry mistake.

        I'm not sure I totally agree that a normal person wouldn't use "that's why". It sounds completely normal to me, and actually it's got a slightly different meaning than "so." I definitely use "that's why" when that's what I mean. I agree that you are almost certainly not going to hear "therefore" in casual speech, and that's one reason why it's not the "best translation." Now, I did not intentionally use "that's one reason why" in that sentence, but coincidentally, I naturally used it. It does work there, and "so" would not have. Anyway, I'm always glad to look into things and to try and improve the course. I'll ask the rest of the team's opinion on this because we do value constructive feedback and want to improve user experience, but my gut tells me that the others will agree that "that's why" is common enough to leave it as is. It's probably more common in context and with a particular tone, while "so" would be more likely with a completely neutral tone. That I agree with.

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