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https://www.duolingo.com/UriyaBA

Pero VS Sino

UriyaBA
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Is there any difference between these two words? When do you use "pero"? When do you use "sino"?

4 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Aglb100
Aglb100
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No me gusta el cricket, sino, me encanta. Sino is mostly used when the first part of the sentence is negative and the second part contradicts the first. So, 'I don't like cricket, but rather, I love it'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickM98
NickM98
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Correction. You'd say "No me gusta el croquet, sino que me encanta", though I don't like it too much :/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aglb100
Aglb100
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Haha, thanks! There's always a sneaky 'que' somewhere that I miss out!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UriyaBA
UriyaBA
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Thanks a lot!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/urijp
urijp
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NickM98 tiene razón. También quiero decir que si lo que sigue a "sino" no es un verbo, no se utiliza el "que". "No soy ingeniero, sino doctor" = "No soy ingeniero, sino que soy doctor"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

from what I've read Pero is But, Sino is more like But Rather

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickM98
NickM98
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Pero means but -> "Lo hago, pero no me gusta" = "I do it, but I don't like it"

Sino means otherwise -> "No tengo tiempo, sino te ayudaría" = "I don't have time, otherwise I'd help you"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/framareci
framareci
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There is often a confusion between "sino" and "si no". The last one is composed by the conditional "si" (if) and the negation "no". I would say the second example should be: "No tengo tiempo. Si no, te ayudaría", being equivalent to: "No tengo tiempo. Si no fuera así, te ayudaría". When you can add a verb after that expression, and the phrase makes sense, it will probably be separate ("si no").

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/haz.mc
haz.mc
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"Sino" can mean "but" depending on the context: No es sino un engaño- It's nothing but a hoax.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/framareci
framareci
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Another way to express the same could be: "No es más que un engaño."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickM98
NickM98
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I like that more. But both are rather archaic. I'd use "Es nada más un engaño" or something like that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickM98
NickM98
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You're right, I didn't think of that. Anyway, that's rather archaic.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/porquepuedo
porquepuedo
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Pero means but as in

Pero nadie estaba en mi casa! But no one was in my house!

Sino means but rather

No vivo en los Estados Unidos, sino México. I don't like in the USA, but rather Mexico.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrettLeifker

Remember even with his correction with sino and sino que, you use the subjective if you are going to choose to do "sino que" but sino is still acceptable if your move your sentence around and use nouns.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mauro922

If this makes it easier for you. Pero = but, Sino = if not. "sino" is literally if + not, but in spanish, and it is the actual literal translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlwaysNachoTime

Sino is an elegant way to provide a non-obvious alternative to a negative statement, without having to start a new sentence.

To avoid confusing it with pero, try replacing it with although–if it works, it's pero; otherwise, it's sino.

> — Me apetecía verte hoy, pero hasta mañana no puedo.

> "I felt like seeing you today, (but/although) until tomorrow, I can't."

> — Pues yo no contaba con verte hoy, sino mañana, así que perfecto.

> "(Well) I wasn't counting on seeing you today, (but/I was counting on seeing you) tomorrow, so that's perfect."

I go deep into the usage context of sino in this NachoTime post.

2 years ago