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https://www.duolingo.com/Hyllning

Favorite Foreign Letter Accent?

What is your favorite (or top favorites) Foreign Letter Accents or Letters? List them here and name what language(s) they are from, if you know!


My Top 3:

1) "A with Ring" - Swedish + More

<h1>Å å</h1>

(lowercase may not show ring unless zoomed in)

2) "U with Macron" - Multiple

<h1>Ū ū</h1>

3) "Capital O with Umlaut" - German + More

<h1>Ö</h1>

You don't need to give examples of letters, only accents are fine!

2 years ago

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Javi-Metal
Javi-Metal
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"Slashed O" - According to Wikipedia, "used in the Danish, Norwegian, Faroese and Southern Sami languages and in the (now dead) language Old Swedish"

Ø ø

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaered
chaered
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This letter cannot quite live off its use in those languages, so its moonlights as a math symbol (empty set) and engineering symbol (diameter). It possibly originated as a Greek letter phi that had a beer too many, so it kind of fell over halfway. Whether the "no parking" red-on-blue traffic sign is a derivative work or original art is still in dispute; people seeing such a sign can mutter "ØMG!" to honor the link.

!(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vienna_Convention_on_Road_Signs_and_Signals#/media/File:Vorschriftszeichen_13a.svg)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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That's like saying the letter O stands in for the digit 0 - they look similar but they're not the same.

Scandinavian letter: Ø empty set: ∅ diameter: ⌀

All together: Ø∅⌀

The minus sign should also look different from the hyphen, but people often simple use the character "-" for both.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaered
chaered
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My post was not entirely serious, but you are right in that there are serious considerations and discussions to be had over what is "the same".

The intro to the Unicode standard talks about this a lot. To illustrate the point, years ago my mother got hold of an old portable mechanical typewriter that had clearly been designed to have as few keys as possible. To save on parts, it had no separate "0" (zero) or "1" (one) digit keys; instead, you were indeed supposed to type an upper-case "O" or "I" (letters). Is a Latin letter "A" the same as a Greek letter "A"? Is a letter "N" printed in italic the same as non-italic? How about the the "N" with a double-barred left used in math to denote the natural numbers: different letter or just same but in a funny font? Does adding an accent to a letter make it into a different letter, anymore than putting a second letter after it would change the first? What about ligatures? The boundaries defined between "same" and "different" are pretty arbitrary, so you kind of have to invoke a specific context or standard (e.g. "in math textbook typesetting in the latter half of the 20th century", or "in illustrated pamphlets written by 15th century Irish monks") to make a definite statement about sameness, and it will apply only within that domain. A fascinating topic, thanks for bringing it up!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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That's true, and one that has led to some discussions during Unicode!

For example, are Coptic letters the same as Greek ones -- just usually written in a different font (a more rounder, 'uncial' one)?

Is the Romanian letter for the "sh" sound the same as the Turkish letter for that sound? In Romanian, it's usually written with a comma beneath an S Ș ș; in Turkish, with a cedilla Ş ş.

In early versions of Unicode, this was deemed to be simply a font issue: "the same" letter that happens to have a different preferred appearance in different countries. (A bit like how "a" with a hook on top or without are considered to be the same letter, or Blackletter Roman letters as used in Germany before the war are considered to be the same as Antiqua Roman letters like they use nowadays.) But later versions of Unicode decided that the Romanian and Turkish "sh" letters are two different letters.

It's not always obvious when two characters are "the same".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KierenMcCormack
KierenMcCormack
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"Æ or æ" used in Danish, Norwegian and others

"Ð or ð" used in Icelandic, Faroese and others

"Þ, þ" used in Icelandic

also some others like "Ƀ,Ƌ,Ħ,Ƿ,Ǯ,Ⱡ,Ɉ,Ȼ" that are used in the Phonetic alphabet.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hyllning

Nice list! I like þ as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PfifltriggPi
PfifltriggPi
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Yea! An eth! And Faroese! A lingot for mentioning Faroese!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PfifltriggPi
PfifltriggPi
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It has got to be the "Ṽ" "ṽ". I have know idea where this is used, but it looks so cool.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PfifltriggPi
PfifltriggPi
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Adding to that, in Cyrillic, I am partial to "Ӂ" "ӂ".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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My guess would be Romanised Cherokee, where "V v" stands for a vowel sound - but since that vowel is always nasal, the tilde is not really needed.

So maybe some other language that uses "V v" as a vowel.

Fun fact: Guaraní (which is taught on Duolingo) uses the tilde on G g: G̃ g̃. (The uppercase version may look a bit off because fonts usually don't have separate symbols for that letter and have to put it together from base letter + tilde, and the tilde ends up too low for the capital letter.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PfifltriggPi
PfifltriggPi
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Right, but how do you type it? I do not see it in my character map.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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The Guaraní letter? It's not in Unicode as a separate symbol, so it needs to be put together out of a G and a combining tilde -- either by copying those two characters out of a character map (which is why I did); or by a keyboard mapping that includes either a combining tilde or a sequence of "g, combining tilde".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PfifltriggPi
PfifltriggPi
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I see. Thanks. I will have to add that to my Roman super extended keyboard layout.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PinefrostLTU
PinefrostLTU
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Probably the ž, from Lithuanian, Latvian and others, and the œ from French and others.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brittalexiswm

Ö, œ, ø, ñ, æ, å, ß, ã, ü, ð, þ

If i had a conlag, i would definitely include all of those!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PfifltriggPi
PfifltriggPi
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That would be impressive. I am making one which has: ş, ħ, ð, ṽ, ñ, ã, â, î, ê and û.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sjodni
Sjodni
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I have a conlang, too, and use the letters ä,ö,å,é,è, and ž.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hyllning

I have one as well, very complicated. I actually have a Document with a lot of information: Alphabet, Basics, Greetings, People, Colors, and Food right now. Everything is lowercase and has "yw" and "lll" a lot in it. It mostly features:

å â ă ā æ é ë e î i ō ø ŏ ǫ ö ū û ü ŭ ų µ u ç þ + Alphabet

It seems very complex with all the letters and accents, but it's really fun because each one is a different sound. Example sentences:

Hi = Hello = hålllū Bye = þyw Thanks = dâtü Okay = ōkåi Welcome = wåmōt Good Morning = gråtū-mōrå Good Night = gråtū-năt How are you doing? = hōyw årt ywå þŏînj?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hyllning

One day it'll be complete, and perhaps I'll share!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hyllning

Some get complicated, with genders and formality.

I (m. / f.) éio” / éåo”

I’m (m. / f.) éiø-m / éåo”-mi

You (inf.) ywå

You (form.)

m. = Masculine, f. = Feminine, inf.= Informal, form. = Formal.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sjodni
Sjodni
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Awesome!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hyllning

dâtü! :3

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sjodni
Sjodni
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I love the ž, ß, and б in the Cyrillic Alphabet. It just rolls as you write it!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RennDimmick
RennDimmick
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The way I write Scots I use á, æ, ǽ, é, í, ó, ú, ý, ð, þ, and rarely ȝ. I enjoy writing every bit of Scots this way. It makes it look less like English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/idshanks
idshanks
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Would you mind sharing an example? I'm curious - I've never seen anyone write Scots with those characters (with the exception of ȝ, of course). It's an amusing thought to picture it written with all of those :P

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RennDimmick
RennDimmick
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Here are some examples:
án - one
bæk - back
dǽg - day
fét - feet
lík - like
bók - book
súþ - south
fýv - five
þré - three
ðe - the
forȝet - forget (It can be pronounced like "forget" or "foryet", just depends on your dialect.)

A lot of my spellings are based on Old English and are meant to be dialect neutral. It works pretty well for the most part, as the sound changes from Old English to Scots are pretty consistent.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deathlinger
Deathlinger
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"ß" just because it looks interesting (and not at all like a Ss sound)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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Ł ł in Polish is probably my favourite. No idea why, I just like it!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConorHoughton
ConorHoughton
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There are the dots on top of consonants in the old Irish script - changing a "b" sound to a "w" and so on; they got replaced by "h"'s in contemporary orthography.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jzsuzsi
jzsuzsi
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All those you listed are cool. I think I would pick the German ä, and the Danish/Norwegian ø. It reminds me of this comic: http://satwcomic.com/nothing-is-perfect

It would be nice to make a list of all accented letters that are used in languages with Roman alphabet. It would be a long list. By the way, where is Ū ū used?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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http://www.eki.ee/letter/chardata.cgi?search=u+with+macron says Ū ū is used in "found in languages: mi [Maori]; mh [Marshallese]; lv [Latvian]; cor [Cornish]; livo [Livonian]; haw [Hawaiian]; lt [Lithuanian];" and also used when transcribing other languages into the Latin Roman alphabet: "bn_r [Bengali (bengali)]; as_r [Assamese (assamese)]; ja_r [Japanese (sino-japanese)]; zh_r [Chinese (sino-japanese)]; ta_r [Tamil (tamil)]; pa_r [Punjabi]; kn_r [Kannada]; ml_r [Malayalam]; hi_r [Hindi (devanagari)]; te_r [Telugu]; fa_r [Persian (perso-arabic)]; gu_r [Gujarati]; or_r [Oriya]; kk_r [Kazakh (cyrillic)]; ar_r [Arabic (perso-arabic)]; ur_r [Urdu (perso-arabic)]; ps_r [Pashto (perso-arabic)];".

As for accented letters... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Latin-script_letters has a big list of Latin-script letters :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lezlie2k2
Lezlie2k2
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I like the Lao letter accents e.g. ເ-ົາ Consonant + ao

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot
DragonPolyglot
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In all of the languages with Roman letters, I like:

A w/ ring (Å), used in Swedish as far as I know

The tilde or "squiggle" (~) over any letter, used over "N" in Spanish and all the nasal vowels in Portuguese.

And I like the Umlauts over the "O" and "U" (with the Ö I use it in Swedish, and the Ü is in Spanish. Plus I spell my real name with a umlaut over the last letter, but I won't say what the name or letter is).

And then, for other types of languages, in Japanese I like the circle that is put next to the H- letters to make them P- sounds. It's tiny but it looks something like the ring on the A: ゜ (は[ha] -> ぱ[pa], ひ[hi] ->ぴ[pi] ect)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheHockeyist

My favorite accented letter is ё (Cyrillic). I'm learning Russian. Enough said. ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orde90
orde90
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ç - french, portuguese, turkish
ß - german
ñ - spanish
ı - turkish
å - swedish
ö, ü - german, turkish
é, í - spanish
â, û - french, turkish

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gjnelson
gjnelsonPlus
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!

2 years ago