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Something cool about reverse trees

tara668
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(Especially about doing a reverse tree cold, as in, doing it without having first gone through the regular tree.)

The slow (at least it's been slow for me) process of shifting from seeing all these indecipherable menu items, labels of things you can click on all over each page, page headings, etc., and hoping you don't click "delete" when you wanted "edit" etc.,

...to all these meanings starting to emerge: "Oh, wait, I know what that means" - oh yeah yeah that makes sense omg.

It's like when you stand up too fast and the world goes black, and then there's a little spot in the middle of your field of vision where you can see, and then the spot just keeps growing as you come to, until the whole world is lit again.

2 years ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ForgedbyHistoria

"It's like when you stand up too fast and the world goes black, and then there's a little spot in the middle of your field of vision where you can see, and then the spot just keeps growing as you come to, until the whole world is lit again."

Well said. I'll just say that doing the reverse Turkish tree before the Turkish for English course came out I felt much more prepared for the grammatical rigors of the language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tara668
tara668
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I'm part-way through that process with Mandarin. The tree from English of course doesn't exist at this point, which actually works out for me - even on vocabulary I can use a lot more repetition. I'm just regilding and planning to continue for as long as it feels useful. Longer if it has become a compulsion by that point:)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IAmJon
IAmJon
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The reverse trees are great. I'm doing the French one. I took me about two years to learn the english to French one but I have nearly completed the reverse tree in about two months.

When you already know many of the words (especially in the earlier lessons) you don't take notice of the extra couple of new words amongst them, I can't imagine how difficult it would be to start a new language and do the tree in two months. I wouldn't know anything at all. I know I need to take in all of the new words in the reverse tree.

I like how it focuses on different things. There is a huge focus on the future tense in the reverse tree and that was somthing that only had a couple of lessons on the English to French tree. That is one of my weaker aspects of the language. I would recommend doing the reverse tree after the English to target language tree.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tara668
tara668
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" you don't take notice of the extra couple of new words amongst them"

Yeah, that reminds me of a sign I saw at a school where I was volunteering. It said if you're picking a book to read, five new words per page is a good number for your reading level.

I noticed that difference of focus too, when I did the Spanish and reverse trees. It's been a while since I've looked at that reverse tree, so I can't remember the details, but I remember it was a nice change.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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One thing I noticed doing the Russian (regular) tree - I've had my iPad set with Russian as its primary language for aaaages. I've grown so used to it I stopped thinking about it. The Russian - English tree was mostly revision for me, so it wasn't hard, but I didn't realise what a good idea having my iPad set up this way was until I was doing the regular tree and got to the technology skill, at which point I realised how many bits and pieces of techy Russian I'd picked up without even realising. I studied Russian the first time back when the Internet was not nearly so ubiquitous, and learning words like cut and paste, file, delete, etc just never happened.

The English for ___ trees seem relatively basic, as compared to some of the trees written for english speakers, but yes, I can absolutely see the benefits, even though I got them in a different way :):):)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tara668
tara668
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Thanks for your comment, flootzavut - when I as studying Spanish I went around setting lots of different interfaces to Spanish, but hadn't thought to do that with Mandarin. (Actually, it probably would have been disastrous, but I might be "ready enough" now, or soon at least.) So, good to get a reminder:)

2 years ago