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  5. "When do you wear a hat?"

"When do you wear a hat?"

Translation:Kiedy nosisz kapelusz?

January 3, 2016

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/margotgm

this has always been introduced as a cap rather than a hat. kapelusz is hat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Unfortunately, the English word 'hat' is very vague and causes a lot of problems. Quick search in Google finds enough examples of "czapka" to make it one of the starred answers :|

A Polish learner of English will almost surely think of "kapelusz", though. That's what we are taught.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shiker3

In Duolingo, kapelusz is defined as a hat. And czapka is defined as a cap.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brandon469259

In what way is the English word 'hat' particularly vague?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Compared to Polish at least - it covers both a baseball cap and an elegant hat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan41836

I've spent a year learning that kapelusz is a hat (with brim) and czapka a cap...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JTPiaskows

Czapke = hat???? 11 months of translating kapelusz as hat(with brim) Now it's a cap ? I'm confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

It's not a 1:1 correspondence.

Polish "kapelusz" is undoubtedly a hat (with a brim), never a cap.

Polish "czapka" is "cap" for some native speakers of English and "hat" for others. When I use Google Graphics and search for "hat", it's about 50/50 division between things I'd call "czapka" and things I'd call "kapelusz".

So... if you take a Polish sentence with "kapelusz", you need to translate it into "hat", and then when you translate it back into Polish, "czapka" becomes another correct translation. And all of it because English can use "hat" for both.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarjanvanK

kapelusz= hat czapka = cap


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

That's what Polish people are taught, but of course English has to make stuff complicated... if you google "hat" and check the Graphics section, you will see a lot of what is called "czapka" :|


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/najwspanialszy

Im trying to practice formal speak as ive been neglecting it, (I got a funny look off a policeman in Poland a few weeks back im assuming because i was referring directly to him in the casual "ty" form). But again pan/pani nosi isn't acceptable here, am i doing something wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

Unfortunately, this course wasn't designed for formal speech practice, so a lot of formal options are still missing. I've added them here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuthienTas1

I think "Kiedy ubierasz kapelusz?" is correct too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

I'm sorry, but no. Some natives say that, but that's not correct Polish. That would mean that you put some clothes on your hat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbymyler

Doesn’t „Nosisz” take accusative? Shouldn’t there be an „a” at the end of „kapelusz”?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

Yes, it's accusative, but kapelusza would be genitive.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/kapelusz#Declension


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TAJPRU

Czapka is a cap kapelusz is a hat....your statement is incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Not sure what statement you're referring to, but to the confusion of many learners, English also uses the word "hat" for things we'd call "czapka".

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