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"A book lay on the table."

Translation:На столе лежала книга.

2 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Jenz114
Jenz114
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Don't panic everyone. While it does indeed sound extremely strange, "lay" is actually the simple past tense of the verb "to lie", which means to rest in a horizontal position. Since we so very often use the incorrect verb in the spoken language, I suggest a quick review of "to lie" and "to lay" found here with all the tenses and meanings. Such is the advantage of studying a foreign language you learn a little about your own in the process. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/lie#Verb https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/lay#Verb

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/csharpmajor
csharpmajor
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Wtf, can no one here English? "Lay" is absolutely the correct past tense of lie. The course creators aren't native English speakers, don't confuse them.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NimaVpr

Nice practice for non-native english speakers :))

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Berniebud
Berniebud
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who in modern times still says "lay" as the past tense? Anyone living in the 21st century uses "laid"

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Berniebud
Berniebud
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or "lied". Never "lay".

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruth440184
Ruth440184
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I do - for my own area в Америке, I'd say that there are many who have a regional awareness of the grammar involved in the transitive/intransitive of to lay/to lie. See also my response to you on your previous comment below.

"Lied," we only use when we say we lied about something - lied about where we were at a particular time, etc., but there is not usually confusion over "to lie" which is used to indicate mendacity.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DYt57

To ley and was leing are diferent . One is past tens .

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rabbit223

A book lay on the table - What kind of crap is this again....? To sad it cannot be english. So what else is it then...?!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sheecko
sheecko
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Lay is in present tense and the correct answer is shown as лежала instead of лежит

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jenz114
Jenz114
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Lay is either the simple past tense of "to lie", or found in the infinitive verb "to lay" which means to place something down into a horizontal position. Native speakers very often use the incorrect verb, hence the confusion.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Berniebud
Berniebud
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Shouldn't this be "A book laid" or "A book was lying" or maybe even "A book lays"? "A book lay" isn't grammatically correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruth440184
Ruth440184
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No, "to lay" is transitive and always takes an object, and "to lie" (not talking about untruthfulness here but instead reclining in a horizontal state) is intransitive.

To lay:

  • He wants to lay down these boxes on the floor. (Infinitive form. Object is boxes.)
  • I lay down my life for this cause. (Present. Object is life.)
  • They are laying sheets of metal on that pallet. (Present continuous. Object is sheets.)
  • I will lay down my arms. (Future. Object is arms.)
  • The workmen laid down flooring. (Past. Object is flooring.)
  • They were laying money on the counter. (Past continuous. Object is money.)
  • She had laid down the law. (Past perfect. Object is law.)

To lie:

  • I want to lie down for a bit. (Infinitive. And people usually get this wrong, because the common way of saying this is, "I want to lay down.")
  • The dog lies on the floor at my feet, which keeps my toes warm. (Present tense.)
  • She is lying on the beach sipping a margarita. (Present continuous.)
  • My dad will lie down for a nap in an hour. (Future.)
  • Mom lay in the shade under the elm tree. (Past.)
  • The coins were lying on the counter. (Past continuous.)
  • The chocolate had lain in the sun all afternoon on my dash. (Past perfect. And a really imperfect situation to find myself in!)

Even so. We are all of us understood in English when we use the wrong form. :-D Also I'm giving ya an upvote because I dislike downvotes on honest questions.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rurikid

You aren't wrong, but it would be exceptionally rare I think in north America to hear 'Mom lay in the shade.' If I heard this today I would assume it is present tense.

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruth440184
Ruth440184
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Come hang out with people in my area in North America. You'll hear it. :) Maybe about other things in the shade. Not about Mom. She's not outdoorsy.

But I know people in North America who say it either way in past tense - Mom lay in the shade, Mom laid in the shade. I would not be able to make a reasonable estimate on statistics one way or the other as to what is more common across the continent.

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rurikid

Can I ask which region? Because I've lived all over from west coast, south west, east coast, midwest and it's not anything I've ever heard.

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruth440184
Ruth440184
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Sure, Johnny Cash! (Your description made me think of his song. :) ) Midwestern US.

4 days ago