https://www.duolingo.com/Karol4717

Esperanto for Africa

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I've been thinking that, seeing the problems the continent is facing and the help it isn't receiving because of the diversity and complexity of its languages, maybe we should make more campaigns for teaching Esperanto in there. THIS WAY! We would encourage more people to help without the thought of wasting too much time in language learning (for both sides), and we could also promote Esperanto with it(imagine a whole continent speaking it). Mi amas diverseco de lingvoj en Afriko. Esperanto povas esti utila ilo por konservi ĝin.

There are some people who are already trying it:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=913827835379320=gm.10153693243445289=3

3 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jirka92122
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It's a good idea, though I think first we must make esperanto a useful language to learn. If enough people in the rich world learn esperanto, then it will be useful for those in the poor world who have few resources. We have the luxury of being able to learn a language we don't really need.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Szaty
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In general, it's a good idea, but I don't know really how it would go on...

First, I have to said that, though Esperanto was meant to be a universal language, it isn't. Esperanto doesn't have many (if there's any) words from African origin, and it would be as difficult as English for many people, when refering to vocabulary.

Second, there are some languages used as lingua franca for many African countries, like Swahili/Arabic, or languages already known in many African countries (like French).

Third, Africa has a lot of languages. In fact, it's the continent with most language diversity (at least a third of the total existent languages) but there are some languages easily spoken by 75% of the population (they are like 12 languages, but difficult).

It would be obviously difficult to achieve, but Esperanto should only be taught as lingua franca, as we can't let alone many native languages that already can be learned in a faster way (for example, learning Swahili and Arabic would cover a great area), or using languages spoken in Africa and in other countries (French and some latin languages like Portuguese are spoken in a good part of central Africa)... maybe.

Esperanto would be an easy language to learn, but it would be difficult for africans (mostly for their resources) and shouldn't be used in contexts that have a better lingual approach (like I said before). We'll see if that's a good idea or not.

PD: I'm not a native speaker. If I have some mistake, please tell me; I'd be grateful for that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Falsafaa
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"Third, Africa has a lot of languages. In fact, it's the country with most language diversity " -Africa is not a country, it is a continent.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabzerbinatoEng
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I'm pretty sure it was a momentaneous confusion. He mentions countries earlier in the text, so I believe he knows Africa is a continent.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Falsafaa
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I am sure that he does too. I guess that what I meant to say was that he should edit that part. Papua New Guinea is the most linguistically diverse country in the world with 850+ languages.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Szaty
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Yeah, I don't know in what I was thinking when I writed that; sorry for the confusion xD

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Falsafaa
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It's okay. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jirka92122
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English is very difficult. I highly doubt Esperanto would be as difficult to learn, even if you do not have similar vocabulary. It is not just vocabulary (which is also smaller in Esperanto), but also grammar, and spelling. In English you have to essentially learn every word twice. Once how it sounds, once how it is written. And then you have to learn the grammar, which is very difficult to get correct (and getting things wrong makes misunderstandings easy).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zevlag13
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English is not that difficult. It's grammar is very easy and simple compared to my native language, Spanish, the only difficult aspect of English is its pronunciation, since, as you say, you have to learn every single word twice, spoken and written, cause English has no pronunciation rules at all. Other than that, English is a great world language. Anyway, if the African Union ever needs an official language, why not an African language like Swahili? Its already spoken as a second language by over 100 Africans, is the lingua franca of central-east Africa and most importantly, its an African language. Esperanto vocabulary is mainly based on European words and was created in Europe, so it fits much better as the official language of the European Union, specially now that English is the language of Brexit and euro-scepticism.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Szaty
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Well, I know Esperanto is a lot easier to learn. But I don't mean to say africans should be learning English, just that it'd be better if American or European or Asian countries learn just some African language who would be easier for some parts of Africa - they wouldn't need to learn another language, even if it's Esperanto or English or Hungarian. Some countries already can speak Swahili (as their mother or second language), and it's easier to europeans to learn Swahili than to africans to learn Esperanto (in terms of resources). It could be better to teach Esperanto in some areas which don't have a wide-extended lingua franca, but (for example) in northern Africa there are a lot of people already speaking Arabic. Why not learn Arabic and go and speak in Arabic to them? There's no need to use Esperanto for the whole continent.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdenney99
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Those are great points! I think it could be easier to use languages that are from the area and spoken there already to provide a lingua franca for the continent. It's definitely true that Esperanto favors European languages, so the idea of it being a global language seems a bit of a stretch as it would be difficult to speakers of African, Asian, Native American, or other non-European languages. I also wonder how speakers of languages such as those that rely on clicks, for one example, would adjust to European languages like Esperanto given their native languages' radical differences from those in Europe.

Your English is very good by the way! Just two things I noticed: "teached" should be "taught"...English is funny like that. Also, "central Africa", not "center Africa".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Szaty
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Thanks, sometimes I forget the words xD

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johan_Fayez
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It is a wonderful idea :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Onklo
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Certainly, it is good. The only problem that Esperanto is not wide spread because of the NGOs which do not respect the resolutions of UNESCO 1985 to use Esperanto.

You can download the resolutions at UNESCO official webpage with the search

http://www.unesco.org

Besides, the World Federation of United Nations Association, which is the first to support to use Esperanto and pass the resolution in 1979 to use Esperanto but till today, nothing is being done. English is still the dominate language and Korean is another official webpage, wondering it is the secretary BAN related.

http://www.uea.org/teko/rezolucioj

More than 75% of the people in the world do not speak a word of English but the NGOs still think that English is the most effective language in the world.

Esperanto is the best language for commerce but no one go on to use it.

The Esperanto tourism in Cambodia, there is no one, in fact only two groups, using the service. The United Nations World Tourism Organisation passed the Manifesto 1980 in Manila, it is in the shelf.

It is something wrong in the Esperantujo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iOfg2
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ne malbona ideo

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackie427701

I know this discussion is more than a year ago.

I am from South Africa and we have an Esperanto association here. I am new to the language and love it, English is also not my first language.

Esperanto is starting to spread as more African countries are starting to get associations and more people are learning and speaking the language. I know some of the countries where Esperanto has spread to are Algeria, Benin, Cameroon, Ghana, Tanzanië, Togo and Tunisia.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EaterofPumkin
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I like it. Sure, it's a long shot, but it's the kind of thinking we need to help our fellow man in this crazy world we live in. Rock on

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chen2shi4xiong2

Good topic por discussion. Esperanto could be a substitute for French. However, Esperanto is Euro-centric and it have no loanwords from any African lingvos. A creole or pidgin based on Esperanto could be more festible and culturally neutral, but the Esperantists would be hostile toward such mixed language from their obsession with la purity of Esperanto.

9 months ago
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