"Di chi sono questi occhiali?"

Translation:Whose glasses are these?

December 13, 2013

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saintsauveur

spectacles ARE glasses!

December 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ricfirth

I endorse saintsauver's comment

January 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/a-muktar

They mark you wrong for words like "trousers" and "chef" lol

December 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Malvina444197

Really?

January 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClaudeMedearis

They even offer "spectacles " as an answer.

August 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/izaakrach

To whom do these glasses belong? Really? That needs to be added as a correct answer.

April 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IARose
  • 1344

I second that though my version was marked as wrong was: to whom do these glasses belong

July 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/talkers

Likewise, LOL.

February 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duolessio

= a chi appartengono questi occhiali?

April 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LotSparham

Me too! I reported it (again?)

April 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16

Very simply put: "di...chi" means "whose'. "Spectacles" are of course glasses but apparently it has not been included in the program.

August 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Manu_Alvarado

Eyeglasses can also be one word.

October 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CraigPickering

I put 'for whom: clunky but English.

April 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lostordimento

Why not 'who do these glasses belong to'?

May 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/talkers

People often say that, but it's poor English to end with a preposition.

February 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Donnyw47

More and more, English grammarians are giving up on the no-ending-a-sentence-with-a-preposition rule. In any event, twisting your sentence to accommodate the rule often leads to awkward phrasings and doesn't sound anything like how people actually speak.

January 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanKing1

I suppose that depends on who(m) you're talking to, or what you're talking about.

November 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CraigPickering

Agreed, but 'to whom' is fast becoming archaic.

April 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piper935593

I so agree. Real colloquial English.

November 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marco98735

Spectacles are glasses.

October 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cosmopolita61

Di means from,so maybe it wasn't accepted because of that. But I put "Whom do these glasses belong to", which was also not accepted :-P

April 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gedhead

I believe in English the "to" should come before the "whom".

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anthony799024

Di chi translates more to "of who" since the structure in italian to show ownership is "gli occhiali di lui" meaning "the glasses of him".

A similar example would be "la madre di Mario" meaning "the mother of Mario"

This being said, this is not an italian structure that can be translated word for word because they speak of ownership in a different way than in English.

Sure you can translate exactly, but it does'nt translate so smoothly.

Also, I think the main reason that the translation is marked as i correct is not for the grammer or the whose/to whom debate, but because of the world "belong" which is a verb that wasnt used in the original sentence. It may ultimately lead to the same meaning, but this sentence only uses the verb "essere" in the form of "รจ." If you use "belong" and try to translate back into italian you would see a different structure. Also, since you would be using "belong," the sentence would place more focus on the glasses than on who they belong to because the glasses are now "verbing" to another object

January 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlenaChern6

Can I say "I cui sono questi occhiali?"

May 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichelineV11

di chi = from who : why is this wrong?

May 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilliamBec18

Why not "whose are those glasses"? Is there a difference between these and those?

August 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Donnyw47

As to whether there is a difference between these and those, yes, and the same is true in English. Questi (these) would apply to glasses that are nearby, maybe even in your hand. Quelli (those) would apply to glasses that are, say, across the room.

August 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lysse7

No.... You don't need to end the sentence with quite. Smh.

November 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/haydee14p

Why is who's not an option

July 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IARose
  • 1344

Because who's is an abbreviation of who is (who being a relative pronoun, and is the verb to be in third person singular) whereas whose is the possessive from of the pronoun who.

July 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DermotMcInerney

I also endorse saintsauveur's comment. I wrote spectacles and was marked incorrect. I'm going to report it.

December 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve140998

Why not "Chi sono gli occhiali?"

December 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanKing1

Some of these comments are spectacular!

December 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrMOOstachE34

I wish they would accept this: Of who/whom are these glasses?

February 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LARISA210496

Whose glasses are these?

April 4, 2019
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