https://www.duolingo.com/colonelsheep

How much daily learning is too much?

Привет!

I started the Russian Duolingo course five days ago, and I've really been enjoying it! I'm finally seeing "р" as a trilled r as opposed to... a p that makes an r sound. I'm also learning quite a bit. It's really cool to feel such quick progress!!

However, although I've made sure to stick to at least 30xp a day, I feel very motivated to practice more! Yet... I'm having difficulty remembering every word, and am afraid running through the Duolingo tree will just make me not retain anything.

Does anyone here have any experience with learning Russian (or any language, really) quickly? More importantly, does anyone have any tips to retain all the vocab learnt?

3 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/muzzyvonmaine

I feel like as long as all your stuff is at "full strength", you are doing OK. I have found that if I acquire too much new stuff on Duolingo or Memrise, it naturally gets to the point where I spend all my study time just covering old stuff. That is why I always make sure to Strengthen Skills before learning anything new. It balances itself out. If I can refresh all my old stuff and still have time and motivation to learn new, then I do!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SpedePasanen

30 per day is nothing. I started about two weeks ago and I'm halfway through. Some days I do 200, on the first day I did 500. You can't overdo learning a language. Remember, in real life there are so called intensive courses where you learn all day, every day for a few weeks. If you feel that you're forgetting some of the things you've learned, just redo that part. That's what strengthening is for.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
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Too much is when your head starts to pop :-)

I've finished my first tree here (French) in exactly 3 months. I did a minimum of 100XP per day and often more. In addition to this, I listened to Michel Thomas's courses and did the French course on Busuu. Ah, and working on exercises from a grammar book. And some reading, too. That was fun!

If you are willing to study a lot, I'd recommend you to use different resources rather than rushing through the Duolingo tree. You'll learn the same things from different sources and from different perspectives, and you won't get bored with too much similar activities. Take Duolingo as your primary day goal, throw in some podcasts or video lessons, write your own things on italki or Lang8, etc.

Have fun!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LateBlt
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Similar to what others have said, how much is "too much" really depends on you personally: how well you retain new vocabulary, what your learning style is, and so on. I first started using Duolingo to learn German, and I blitzed through it fairly quickly because my native language is English, and German isn't that different from English in many respects. In contrast, going through Russian has been a very slow and somewhat difficult process for me, because the vocabulary is just so alien. If you already speak a Slavic language, learning another one is much easier, but if Russian is your first Slavic language, then it's going to be slow. There isn't really any way around this.

Keep in mind that when learning a language, duration is more important than intensity. It's more important to study every day than to put in a huge binge where you study for 10 hours in one day. The important thing is to devote some time every day to learning the language. If you consistently do this, that is better than studying like crazy and then putting it off for a few days.

So, to get an idea of how you personally are coming along: if you go back and redo a few previous lessons from some time ago, do you find that you've remembered all the concepts from those lessons pretty well? If so, then you are doing all right and can try to step up the intensity a bit if you want. If not, if you find that you've already forgotten what you learned before, it's probably best to stop and go back to review what you've lost than keep charging forward.

It can be tempting to want to just blast all the way through to the end of the tree so that you can say you're done. I admit that for me personally, that's what I'm doing even though I think I've forgotten some of the earlier stuff from earlier lessons, but that's because I'm already almost at the end of the Russian tree. Once I get it done, I'll start from the beginning and go through it again to repeat everything, but right now I just want to get it done so that I can repeat the lessons in an arbitrary order. If you're close to the end too, you might as well do the same, but if you're not yet halfway through and you find that you're having some trouble, it might be worthwhile to moderate forward progress with some review of past material.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ctangsgaard
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I don't think you can asks others how many points is the right amount. It depends so much on what you've done previously and what else you're doing and how the duolingo method is working for you.

I did my first tree (Dutch) in 10 days and found that I retained almost everything. Now Dutch is also quite close to my mothertongue (Danish), which makes it way easier. When I started doing Turkish, I had to slow down significantly and even after finishing it, I didn't feel I could really use it - more that I had knowledge about the language (although I made sure that I remembered most of the vocab, grammar and structure).

Now, I'm doing Russian, and for this language, I don't actually think duolingo is the best method for me since there are many more constructions that are not close to each other if you do a literal translation. So now I'm going through it quite slowly and mainly doing something else to learn Russian (http://russianmadeeasy.com/ is amazing!), supplementing with duolingo. But depending on your previous knowledge and your background your story might be totally different.

Good luck!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/toomath
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30 sounds about right. If you want to do more, try other forms of learning to get a variety of inputs.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/germanwannabee

hi, you randomly received 2L

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seattle_USA
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3 lessons a day isn't much. Try to turn one circle gold a day and do more by going back on previous circles and doing all the tests on anything you don't remember words from or that you didn't understand the verb or noun endings on. Russian takes time to digest for many reasons - the new alphabet, dealing with they new keyboard whether on screen or physical, as well as I think it's harder to get used to verb and noun ending for case and who the person is doing the action because of the cyrillic letters. It doesn't hurt to get it down in both English and Cyrillic. Don't even get me started on the pronunciations and trying to hear them. If you do need to go slower, go slower.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ruslanruskan

The first time around is the hardest, so go through it as fast as possible. I've been learning Russian for 2 years now, and I'm using Duolingo just as a side fun way to maintain my Russian.

After you complete your Russian tree the first time, you're basically exposed to the language and you know what to expect, then you become a bit more comfortable with Russian, and the 2nd time around it'll be easier and easier.

Good luck, Russian is the most romantic language in the world, in my opinion and experience. ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mjk800
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I have found it difficult to retain vocabulary from going solely through the Duolingo lessons and have supplemented the vocabulary side of learning with Memrise. As far as utilizing free language learning resources, the two seem to complement each other well. I have difficulty getting the vocabulary to stick just using Duolingo, but I don't get the language structure and grammar from Memrise.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LauraElizabethR

Since I'm doing the lessons using the Russian alphabet I've found I don't really retain the vocab just working through the tree and constantly have to double check translations. But once I started putting terms into Quizlet flashcards and reviewing those I retain the terms much more effectively and remember how to spell them. Now when I do a lesson I enter each new term into a set of Quizlet cards then later in the day go through the cards first Russian to English then English to Russian.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seattle_USA
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I'm doing the tree twice at the same time - I go forward and turn new circles gold using the English letters instead of Cyrillic and way behind them, I'm coming up the tree using the Cyrillic letters. It's way easier because I'm learning the cyrillic letters on words I already know. I also do a daily review of the last few circles I've done before adding a new circle each day so I strenghen the past lessons to where I don't forget. I've found this very important in learning the russian tree and important to have the words down before I start doing them in cyrillic. I know others are just going through the cyrillic tree only but I found that way too slow for me. The spelling is different in Russian than English but it's phonetically the same.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/notyourname1

I have been learning Russian for the last seven years and the biggest thing i have learned about learning any language in general is that the more consistent and more time you put into it the faster you will learn. Like Lateblt said it's better to do a few minutes every day then binge study for a long time one day a week. The only real way you can study too much is to not take breaks. A lot of studies say about 5 to 10 minutes of a break for every 30 minutes of studying. Also while studying don't stay seated the whole time. Its good to stand and move around while you study.

As far as retaining vocab goes while Duolingo is a very very excellent program in my opinion, it has helped me a lot learning Ukrainian, it should not be your only method of learning a language. You should use many methods. Flashcard programs like memrise and anki are very good in my opinion. Watching movies in Russian and listening to songs in Russian will help a lot. Create a song with the words that you do know. even if it is just random words together that don't make since. And the best way for retaining vocab is to speak it with a native speaker when ever possible even if you just repeat a lot of words over and over again. I find it best for me personally when they do not speak English because it forces me to dig down deep to remember words. If you live in an area where you do not know or run into Russians often there are various websites specifically for language learning where you can find a native Russian to speak with. Unfortunately I can't remember them off the top of my head.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seattle_USA
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Is Ukrainian very much like Russian? I'm asking because when I finished the Spanish tree, I tried the Italian tree and it started messing me up in both languages so I had to stop it and take German and then come back to it a few months later. I want to take Ukrainian but I'm not sure if it will be a problem if I take it right after Russian.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/notyourname1

The two are fairly similar. There are some words that are the same and some words that sound similar. Grammar concepts are also very similar. When I first started I was mixing them up a little and my Ukrainians friends were telling me I speak Ukrainian like a Russian. But eventually mixing them goes away

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seattle_USA
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Good to know! I think I will wait a few months then because my experience with Italian right after Spanish was so bad.

3 years ago
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