"I like sugar."

Translation:J'aime le sucre.

January 12, 2013

74 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdiab

Why is "le" necessary here? There is no "the" in the translation...

January 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alejrb

Unfortunately, you can't directly translate this. French uses articles (small words like le, la, du etc.) in many cases where English doesn't.

January 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gregoir123

The French rule I learned is: No naked nouns. There always needs to be an article.

February 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavBlayn

Why wouldn't "du" be acceptable?

February 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YahyaZuhair

"j'aime du sucre" is correct grammatically, but it's not the correct way.
The rule is to use definite article "le, la, les, l'" with the verbs of passion/emotion like "like, love, hate, dislike, disgust...etc"
In this case "aime" falls in that category.

February 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaraHinata

THANK YOU! I was so confused! I thought that when it said 'I eat sugar' I had to use 'du' and only 'the' when specified with 'le' You have enlightened me!

February 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YahyaZuhair

@SaraHinata: "THANK YOU! I was so confused! I thought that when it..."

I'm so happy that I've been of help to you.
Here's a lingot to keep you motivated.

February 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shreyafrench1

Ohh now i get it i was "du" a zillion times and was gettin it all wrng thanx buddy! U deserve lingout!!!!!

October 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YahyaZuhair

@venetoblu: "Thanks for this explanation...."

Yup, that's exactly what I meant. I have corrected the mistake.
Cheers!

October 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YahyaZuhair

@REINE_MOI_123: "thank you so much for explaining that..."

glad to help you

February 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/venetoblu

Thanks for this explanation. (Do you mean 'disgust' rather than 'disguise' ?)

October 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Firstlady100

thank you so much for explaining that. it was driving me nuts!

February 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YahyaZuhair

@shreyafrench1: "Ohh now i get it i was "du" a zillion times...."

Glad to be helpful... thanks for the lingot.

October 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmjedDweik

Highly ironic, given that many Americans assume the French culture embraces nudity. Thanks @gregoir123 for the info !

November 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joel-Iowan

So following another post here, would you use j'aime du sucre over j'aime le sucre?

I eat sugar is Je mange du sucre... but I like sugar is Je mange le sucre?

And.. what is du if not de + article(le)??..

March 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamahMagdi

Yesss..I need to know That is error or what ?

August 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minaajasaur

Why doesn't "J'adore le sucre: work here?

January 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hotrootsoup

Seriously, what a tease. Maybe advanced French grammar teachers can worry about that one, but "I adore sugar" makes perfect sense.

Edit: To clarify, I got "J'adore" as a multiple choice answer.

January 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katemari

i put j'adore and j'aime and got incorrect. (yes, with le sucre)

February 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luctie

think it's strained to put 'j'aime' and j'adore' together here as choices. At least both can express the same feeling and only the extents are different. But aren't the same feeling enough to match the question??

February 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SANimbalkar

They asked "like" not love, if it was love then "adore" would be correct

October 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexane182

Both J'aime le sucre and J'adore le sucre are correct !!!

February 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zom-B

Not J'aime du sucre..? Le sucre seems more like "the sugar".

February 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thadjanisse

It accepted j'aime du sucre for me.

February 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YahyaZuhair

It's wrong though. The rule in French is to use the "le, la, les" after using the verb like/love "aimer"
I learned this in discussions, so hope it helps.

December 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minaajasaur

Yep! And with food, too. Even though you'd really say, je veux manger du pain. You would say- j'aime le pain

March 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SANimbalkar

It is not due to food. It is because of the emotion used (aimer).

October 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/camillesar2

It said I was wrong when I selected that, so inconsistent, especially because two questions before it told me that was the answer

February 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/conniebae

how come j'adore doesn't work?

February 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minaajasaur

J'adore tends to be used more flippantly (J'adore Paris... J'adore cette chemise!). It's similar to English's 'to like.' Aimer is love, but also to like and I've never really heard anyone say J'adore la nourriture - it's awkward.

December 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ramzanova

poivre and sucre both have 'e's on the end and are both masculine, why?

July 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/letibocos

it is the adjective the one that should end in "e" when is femenine, not the noun...

January 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bullywoolyarns

wouldn't le mean the sugar? because this is an unmeasured amount I thought it would be du or de le?

October 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hugofayu

You are right for saying that "sucre" is an unmeasured word. But when using such verbs like "aimer", "préférer" or "détester" (dislike), on should use "le, la, les" and not "du, de la, de l'". "J'aime le sucre" ≠ "Je n'aime pas le sucre" but "Je veux du sucre" ≠ "Je ne veux pas de sucre"

October 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bbryant6

"le" denotes the sugar as in you like sugar in general. du or de le suggests that you only like some sugar but not others. Hope that helps.

July 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/unicornvolant

Doesnt Adore mean like as well?

January 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YahyaZuhair

"adore" means love or adore in english; which is emphasising the love!
"aime" means like or love

January 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mega9Yo

It clearly didn't have a "the" in it, if there is no "the" then we don't put the "le" in the translation! Or do we?

March 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LBLou

With words expressing your like or dislike of something, you do not use "de la, du (de+le), de l', des" - but simply "le, la, l', les". It's a French thing! The le in this instance does not mean 'the' - but is simply the article that goes along with French nouns. We don't have this in English - where the article needs to be attached to the noun (well not often, anyways).

With other verbs, you would use de la, du (de+le), de l', des - to mean either 'some' of that thing, or simply you are doing, e.g. eating (of) that thing.

Je mange du fromage = I eat cheese = I am eating cheese = I am eating some cheese (Literally - in English, I eat of the cheese but you cannot always translate literally from one language to another.)

Je mange le fromage = I eat THE cheese = I am eating THE cheese.

However….

J'aime le fromage = I like cheese

J'adore le fromage = I loooove cheese! (but for me ONLY if it is fromage de chèvre! 'o) )

As someone above said - No naked nouns! in French! They must have an article attached to them (at the front), i.e. le, la, l', les

So for example, "Cheese is fabulous" (meaning generally you think cheese is fabulous, not a specific cheese) - this would be in French "Le fromage est fabuleux!" and not just "Fromage est fabuleux" which would be incorrect.

If you were talking about a specific cheese, you could then say, "Ce fromage est fabuleux!" (This cheese is fabulous)

I hope that makes sense!

June 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mega9Yo

OK, thanks, but I know now. But thanks anyways. :)

June 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vanessa_Amaron

dearest duolingo - there seems to be much confusion regarding the use of "du" and "le" with regards to the sentence "j'aime le sucre." may i suggest posting an explanation of WHY the above sentence is correct/incorrect instead of merely a "check" or "x", or other users postulating the seemingly nebulous rules of the french language. are there no moderators?!

March 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LBLou

With words expressing your like or dislike of something, you do not use "de la, du (de+le), de l', des" - but simply "le, la, l', les". It's a French thing! The le in this instance does not mean 'the' - but is simply the article that goes along with French nouns. We don't have this in English - where the article needs to be attached to the noun (well not often, anyways).

With other verbs, you would use de la, du (de+le), de l', des - to mean either 'some' of that thing, or simply you are doing, e.g. eating (of) that thing.

Je mange du fromage = I eat cheese = I am eating cheese = I am eating some cheese (Literally - in English, I eat of the cheese but you cannot always translate literally from one language to another.)

Je mange le fromage = I eat THE cheese = I am eating THE cheese.

However….

J'aime le fromage = I like cheese

J'adore le fromage = I loooove cheese! (but for me ONLY if it is fromage de chèvre! 'o) )

As someone above said - No naked nouns! in French! They must have an article attached to them (at the front), i.e. le, la, l', les

So for example, "Cheese is fabulous" (meaning generally you think cheese is fabulous, not a specific cheese) - this would be in French "Le fromage est fabuleux!" and not just "Fromage est fabuleux" which would be incorrect.

If you were talking about a specific cheese, you could then say, "Ce fromage est fabuleux!" (This cheese is fabulous)

I hope that makes sense!

June 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nina123456013323

"J'adore le sucre", can also mean I like sugar.

April 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LBLou

In this instance it would more correctly mean "I LOOOVE sugar!" - which you might! So I would think either could be correct. It would just be really emphasising the degree to which you like it. You could say it - but it would not simply mean, "I like sugar".

Aimer meaning like OR love is more specifically for people than objects/foods - so that you would be more likely to say J'adore if you REAAALLLLY love a food, or clothing item, for example. That's my understanding, anyways.

June 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ashowly

Shouldn't this be correct using either 'le' or 'du' ? It says I like sugar, not I like the sugar.

May 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YahyaZuhair

verbs involving emotions, generally, take the definitive article "le, la, les, l'" rather than the partitive articles "du, de la, des"

May 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ashowly

Oh really? Thanks for the tip. :)

May 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LBLou

With words expressing your like or dislike of something, you do not use "de la, du (de+le), de l', des" - but simply "le, la, l', les". It's a French thing! The le in this instance does not mean 'the' - but is simply the article that goes along with French nouns. We don't have this in English - where the noun needs to be attached to the article. (Well not that often.)

With other verbs, you would use de la, du (de+le), de l', des - to mean either 'some' of that thing, or simply you are doing, e.g. eating (of) that thing.

Je mange du fromage = I eat cheese = I am eating cheese - I am eating some cheese

J'aime le fromage = I like cheese

J'adore le fromage = I loooove cheese! (but for me ONLY if it is fromage de chèvre! 'o) )

As someone above said - No naked nouns! in French! They must have an article attached to them (at the front), i.e. le, la, l', les

So for example, "Cheese is fabulous" (meaning generally you think cheese is fabulous, not a specific cheese) - this would be in French "Le fromage est fabuleux!" and not just "Fromage est fabuleux" which would be incorrect.

If you were talking about a specific cheese, you could then say, "Ce fromage est fabuleux!" (This cheese is fabulous)

I hope that makes sense!

June 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YahyaZuhair

there's no such thing as "de le".
du is contraction of 'de + le'

and we do have the definitive article (le, la, les, l') in English, but we don't always mention it; as it indicates generalities in the French sentence

June 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LBLou

Cheers! That could have been confusing not to clarify that!! I shouldn't respond late at night!

June 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LBLou

Oh and

Je mange le fromage = I am eating THE cheese.

June 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarrelLois

I'm unable to see all the comments. I'm only able to see the first one of 41. Suggestions?

May 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShirleyFittro

I am annoyed there is no consistent use of article le and du. I used le on a previous answer and was wrong. I used du in this answer and was wrong. Please, what are all the rules here. Specific noun was le sucre.

May 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LBLou

With words expressing your like or dislike of something, you do not use "de la, du (de+le), de l', des" - but simply "le, la, l', les". It's a French thing! The le in this instance does not mean 'the' - but is simply the article that goes along with French nouns. We don't have this in English - where the article needs to be attached to the noun (well not often, anyways).

With other verbs, you would use de la, du (de+le), de l', des - to mean either 'some' of that thing, or simply you are doing, e.g. eating (of) that thing.

Je mange du fromage = I eat cheese = I am eating cheese = I am eating some cheese (Literally - in English, I eat of the cheese but you cannot always translate literally from one language to another.)

Je mange le fromage = I eat THE cheese = I am eating THE cheese.

However….

J'aime le fromage = I like cheese

J'adore le fromage = I loooove cheese! (but for me ONLY if it is fromage de chèvre! 'o) )

As someone above said - No naked nouns! in French! They must have an article attached to them (at the front), i.e. le, la, l', les

So for example, "Cheese is fabulous" (meaning generally you think cheese is fabulous, not a specific cheese) - this would be in French "Le fromage est fabuleux!" and not just "Fromage est fabuleux" which would be incorrect.

If you were talking about a specific cheese, you could then say, "Ce fromage est fabuleux!" (This cheese is fabulous)

I hope that makes sense!

June 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChelsieG2

Why can't you say J'adore le sucre ?

May 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LBLou

See some of the posts above. J'adore is a very strong description - I'm guessing they are presuming most people don't feel so strongly about sugar?? Now chocolate…. that's a different matter! J'adore le chocolat!! 'o) (sans sucre!)

June 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frogangel44444

shouldn't this be "J'aime du sucre"?

January 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LBLou

With words expressing your like or dislike of something, you do not use "de la, du (de+le), de l', des" - but simply "le, la, l', les". It's a French thing! The le in this instance does not mean 'the' - but is simply the article that goes along with French nouns. We don't have this in English - where the article needs to be attached to the noun (well not often, anyways).

With other verbs, you would use de la, du (de+le), de l', des - to mean either 'some' of that thing, or simply you are doing, e.g. eating (of) that thing.

Je mange du fromage = I eat cheese = I am eating cheese = I am eating some cheese (Literally - in English, I eat of the cheese but you cannot always translate literally from one language to another.)

Je mange le fromage = I eat THE cheese = I am eating THE cheese.

However….

J'aime le fromage = I like cheese

J'adore le fromage = I loooove cheese! (but for me ONLY if it is fromage de chèvre! 'o) )

As someone above said - No naked nouns! in French! They must have an article attached to them (at the front), i.e. le, la, l', les

So for example, "Cheese is fabulous" (meaning generally you think cheese is fabulous, not a specific cheese) - this would be in French "Le fromage est fabuleux!" and not just "Fromage est fabuleux" which would be incorrect.

If you were talking about a specific cheese, you could then say, "Ce fromage est fabuleux!" (This cheese is fabulous)

I hope that makes sense!

June 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/loyalgurl

Why is J'adore le sucre incorrect?

April 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LBLou

Strictly speaking it isn't - but it would not mean, I like sugar, it would mean emphatically.. I looove sugar!

June 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessicaSan21

Why not Je aime instead J'aime?

April 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YahyaZuhair

when a word ends with a vowel and the next word starts with a vowel or an unpronounced H, the last letter 'vowel' of the first letter is removed and replaced with an apostrophe '
this is the case here,
je; ends with a vowel
aime; starts with a vowel
so they become j'aime together.

of course, there are some exceptions for this rule, but this is how it's done most of the time ;)

April 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InonCohen

Why isn't j'adore accepted ?

May 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YahyaZuhair

'aime' means like or love in English;
but 'adore' means to love or to adore, which emphasises on love emotion

May 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InonCohen

So j'adore we say to people and not about things like chocolate , cold weather , leather jackets ect. ?

May 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YahyaZuhair

you can say both "j'aime" and "j'adore" to people
but saying "j'adore" to choclate, cold weather or leather jackets, doesn't seem right, unless you really really love them, which doesn't make sense tbh.

May 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarrelLois

My answer which was wrong, was J'aime du sucre. Wouldn't that be correct as well?

May 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LBLou

With words expressing your like or dislike of something, you do not use "de la, du (de+le), de l', des" - but simply "le, la, l', les". It's a French thing! The le in this instance does not mean 'the' - but is simply the article that goes along with French nouns. We don't have this in English - where the article needs to be attached to the noun (well not often, anyways).

With other verbs, you would use de la, du (de+le), de l', des - to mean either 'some' of that thing, or simply you are doing, e.g. eating (of) that thing.

Je mange du fromage = I eat cheese = I am eating cheese = I am eating some cheese (Literally - in English, I eat of the cheese but you cannot always translate literally from one language to another.)

Je mange le fromage = I eat THE cheese = I am eating THE cheese.

However….

J'aime le fromage = I like cheese

J'adore le fromage = I loooove cheese! (but for me ONLY if it is fromage de chèvre! 'o) )

As someone above said - No naked nouns! in French! They must have an article attached to them (at the front), i.e. le, la, l', les

So for example, "Cheese is fabulous" (meaning generally you think cheese is fabulous, not a specific cheese) - this would be in French "Le fromage est fabuleux!" and not just "Fromage est fabuleux" which would be incorrect.

If you were talking about a specific cheese, you could then say, "Ce fromage est fabuleux!" (This cheese is fabulous)

I hope that makes sense!

June 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarrelLois

Merci beaucoup! This explanation was very helpful.

June 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeffsk7

I don't think anyone else posted this, but French is often backwards from English; or they just rearrange the words. So why can't you say "Du sucre, je l'aime" I thought that would mean "Sugar, I like it." And previously there was a sentence structured like this, so I figured it was common in French.

June 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mashwillnotfly

Why can't I use du instead of le? I mean there is no 'the' in the sentence

December 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DebtanuCha

Why le? Why not du?

April 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SCP-049_

The is no "the" in the English sentence. Duolingo should switch "le" with "du".

November 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SebastianReynaM

why is it wrong to use "je aime" instead of "J'aime"

April 8, 2016
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