https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheDragonRises

Can we please have a Grammar Section next to the Vocabulary Section?

Although it is important to not only memorize grammar, you need some grammar throughout Duolingo.

Without a grammar lesson or two alongside its exercises, Duolingo lacks the advanced proficiency aspect for many of its languages.

Personally, my French skill level has skyrocketed since I've started using Duolingo, but I need more grammar. I had no trouble reactivating my Spanish with Duolingo, but learning an entirely new language is a different story.

Thoughts?

December 14, 2013

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FelixKatze

While I agree it would be nice to see a grammar section, and would welcome one, I'm not sure how well suited Duolingo's translation-based teaching method is, to teaching (the finer points of) grammar, especially as grammar rules and their application differ so greatly, between languages-- I imagine both a huge amount of work, and a change in approach for the grammar-based lessons, would be needed.

Given the work it would take to make for (high quality) grammar teaching, I'm not sure how practical it would be for DL to focus on that, over other potential areas of improvement.

In the meantime, why not supplement Duolingo with other resources? Used grammar textbooks can be obtained quite cheaply. Or if you'd prefer to stick to free resources (though I think, for grammar, a quality reference text is best), the internet is good for that, about.com is decent, for example.

Duolingo is a wonderful tool, but I am a big advocate of combining learning resources, rather than relying exclusively on any one thing, as no one learning resource, or tool, can be all things to all people.

December 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheDragonRises

I agree that one should combine learning resources, but I think that a grammar section would be a nice thing. I supplement my learning with books from the Barron's Educational Books, verb drill books, watching French shows on Hulu and/or Netflix (albeit a limited selection), and talking with my French friends.

Once you are very proficient in a language, you need an advanced grammar book to improve in your language, read texts in that language, be immersed in an academic and/or business environment, or teach that language to reach the highest level of fluency in that language.

Conversational French took me about three months give or take, but to reach C2 fluency in French will take me at least six more months of grammar.

Right now with Duolingo's help over the past six months in addition to formal classes and a verb book, I have reached a B1 fluency level in French.

For those who are struggling to reach a C2 level in Spanish, I highly recommend "Schaum's Outline of Spanish Grammar, 6th Edition", Advanced Spanish Step-by-Step by Barbara Bregstein, Barron's Educational Books, El cronometro / The Timer, or "Gramática de uso del Español. Teoria y practica. Con solucionario. C1-C2". As a bilingual speaker, all of these books cover important higher level Spanish topics such as all of the 13(yes 13!) verb tenses, the situations where you use those verb tenses, and irregular adjectives, verbs, and adverbs.

December 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/revdolphin

I personally like the way Duolingo teaches grammar. When I tried to relearn Spanish in high school the grammar lessons made me confused and frustated. But with Duolingo the grammar presents itself naturally in the course of language exposure, and I understand it better not because I have memorized a set of rules, but rather because the language just seems to sound right a certain way.

December 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Samy1979

I'm with you! I also like the way to learn the grammar naturally. To memorize rules is not a real funny and helpful way. Sometimes is it helpful to know a rule, but there are now hints in duolingo thats enough. I started duolingo because it works without drill off grammar.

@all who wanna grammar sessions

Just mediate about it: Do you know much grammar rule of your native language? Most people does not. But of course the speak and write in the right way. That's natural learning of a laguage.

December 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KayTheAwesome216

I agree that Duolingo has a good approach to teaching grammar, but I think it might be helpful to have an extra grammar section to supplement and brush up on things that I may have forgotten from the lessons.

December 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CecilieO.

Personally I don't want lessons as much as something that states "this is the rule" and shows an example or two.

Some gramatical rules are almost impossible to memorise without explanation, I still refer to some rules in my native language when writing to get it correctly. This is especially crucial in relation to homophones and prepositions in most languages.

December 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.DavidCR

Excellent idea, that will foster the our lerning a lot, since sometimes is really confusing make exercises without a proper grammar explenation.

Users could SHARE video explanations on especific topics of grammar and alongside with a FORUM for each language where users could meet to get in touch for language lerning....

Well just my ideas, but i get enthusiast about it because I LOVE DUOLINGO.

December 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeafGrace

I would like a grammar section just so I could understand WHY I made mistakes. I often have this trouble, not able to figure out how to stop doing it wrong. I just run out of hearts over and over again, and that doesn't help.

December 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zass30

One simply cannot learn French verb agreements without grammar instruction. For example: "Accord du participe passé" must be taught. It can't be learned though example. French kids get it wrong until they are taught. There should definitely be a grammar section.

December 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarcoBorromeo

IMO, the implicit grammar should simply be better explained, so I just would improve the algorithms that recognize what you've done wrong and explain that after each error. So you could implicitly teach all the grammar systematically without needing the user to bother about it. As one goes further in learning more and more exceptions and irregularities might be added into the sentences. I recognize this is something which requires much work, but if it's well done it could help to dramatically improve the quality of our educational systems alongside with websites like khanacademy. For funding I would suggest going the same way as khanacademy: just ask Mr. Gates or other wealthy people ;)

December 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheDragonRises

Great idea! If you could repost this in tomorrow morning, this should get visibility from the mods. Please repost this. Thank you!

December 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goran12

This is a good way to teach grammar (now we need discussion and external sources for this) while maintaining the paradigm DuoLingo chose. I like it because it is likely to maintain the focus on translation, which should earn DuoLingo enough money to grow better and better.

December 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GloGuagno

I study English, Spanish and German at the high school and then i started using Duolingo to learn French. I agree with the ones who say that grammar isn't necessary to speak a lenguage (people understand you anyway), but I think that if you want to really understand a lenguage you need to know exactly how it works, and this is grammar. Of course it's complicated, especially for example when you speak English and you have to learn for the first time a neo-latin lenguage. After this, it depends on your porpouse :) (i'm sorry, i'm sure i've made some mistakes :) )

December 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CapK9

I actually like how Duolingo works. Don't have a grammar section makes us eager to look for some in another plataforms such as books, internet, other people or whatever we prefer. I'm planning to buy some french books, Duolingo did enough for me when it introduced me in the "french world", when we come to a place where you know how the language's logic works we are ready to do this on our pace.

December 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GloGuagno

You're right. I just meant that maybe there could be a little scheme with all the tips you find along the levels! They could get lost and in this way it's easier to clear some doubts that you could have

December 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Usagiboy7

I wanted to let folks know that, while there isn't an official grammar section that I know of (aside from some Staff helps if you go to the Language forums and go to the "Most Popular" tab) there are DL community resources for grammar etc. http://www.duolingo.com/comment/1254215 Scroll down to the bottom of the main post, see the last picture posted there. It was very helpful in getting me through the last couple of lessons I've completed in my tree.

December 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tripleboobs69

This is long overdue.

December 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vWildeboer

I agree. Duoling is great for practicing a language you already know, but for learning a new language the grammar is defenitely lacking.

January 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beatles-Musician

I also want to agree with this thought and I would support a grammar section!

December 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/inkybaba

I agree, my only language is English, and when I saw Ich trinke and Wir trinken I thought it meant different tenses

December 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/osnat2

hello,i agree about the grammer, I don't understand, if I don't know Spanish yet' how can I translate the sentence -the woman drink water- I don't know how to say drink in Spanish- it's my first time here, so maybe I missing something. I be glad if someone will explain me :)

December 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Usagiboy7

Hi osnat2,

Welcome to Duolingo! You might find this link helpful, it is a Guide to Finding Guides on Duolingo http://www.duolingo.com/comment/1278938 basically, a repository of tutorials for various parts of the website.

To start learning a language, just jump in and give it a try. Duolingo uses visual, multiple choice, audio, and trial and error strategies (I may have forgotten some) to help you learn. To help motivate you, Duolingo awards you coins for completing lessons, practices, and translating in Immersion. The more coins you get, the higher you go up in levels. In addition, DL gives you Lingots (the red jewel looking things) that you can spend on things, like extra chances in lessons. If you go to the Store tab on your Home page, click it and scroll to the bottom for a full explanation of how to get lingots and what you can do with them. :)

If a feature doesn't exist on Duolingo, such as onsite dictionary and grammar guide, it is likely that someone on the internet has already created it, and you can get to it via search engine with around 1-3 clicks. Here are a few things that have worked for me:

Youtube provides grammar tutorials. And I like to use www.wordreference.com as a dictionary. If flashcards suit your study preferences, there is Memrise, Anki, and my favorite www.cram.com (I learned cram.com first and it feels familiar and simple to navigate so I've stuck with it. But, several people like the other two places. I don't have much experience with them.) Get creative with your language learning and don't limit yourself by waiting for something that isn't here yet, you've got the whole internet so don't hold back! ^_^

PS "to drink" in Spanish is "Beber" I drink is "Bebo" you drink is "Bebe" they drink is "Beben" and we drink is "Bebemos". If you want to ask questions specifically about spanish, go to the link I posted for the Guide to Finding Duolingo Guides, and find the link for Where to discuss What on Duolingo

December 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GloGuagno

You drink is 'Tu bebeS' :)

December 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Usagiboy7

Thanks! I forgot to add the informal you ^^;

December 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Samy1979

That's the way duolingo works. You can see the translation an memorize it. At least that the way i learn french.

December 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tgb746

Yes. There are so many sources for Grammar out there. But I find myself buried in them and not knowing where to start.

If we got an answer wrong due to a word ending or word placement, explain why. What case, what word order. These are things that are important. Especially when you've got sentences like this: Trotz dem Fleisch, esse ich die Suppe. That's inverted word order and the comma makes things tricky, but the lack of conjunction means it's word order is correct and the comma isn't really necessary.

Having a bubble pop up and say, "That's inverted word order," "conjunctive clauses use normal word order," or just tables describing the grammatical cases of articles, nouns, and adjective endings.

In short I agree, even the smallest hint what grammatical mistake was made can assist in finding a source better suited to explaining why the mistake was made, and how to not make that mistake again.

July 22, 2014
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