"Idę na górę."

Translation:I am going upstairs.

January 6, 2016

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Haxprocessor

Could this also mean "I am walking to the mountain"?

January 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/KemotS

If you mean walking towards the mountain, we could say "Idę w stronę góry or Idę w kierunku góry. "Idę na górę" could be translated as climbing a mountain. But if you mean climbing, it is better to say "wchodzę na górę" or "wspinam się (na górę)" . If you mean hiking in the mountains we could say "Idę w góry" or "Idę pospacerować po górach".

February 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/one_half_3544

what about "I'm going uphill"?

September 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

I'd rather say "Idę do góry" in such a situation. Of course if I am going by foot.

"Idę na górę" is rather "I am going to another floor (above the one I am currently on)".

September 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/KemotS

Uphill here could be translated as "pod górę" (meaning, the whole way is only up). So we can translate it as "Idę pod górę".

September 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98

so why does the ó disappear sometimes when you conjugate the word and sometimes it doesn't?

May 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Polish children are taught, when learning orthography (u vs ó, to be exact), that we write "ó" and not "u" jeśli wymienia się na "o" (if it 'changes' to 'o'). So this rule rather goes in another way that you ask, but it's probably the best I can find. Also not every ó does change to o, as you noticed. But I don't think there's any easy way to know which ones.

May 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98

well isn't it that in general short one-syllable words lose the ó? mój, twój, stół, sól, móc...

May 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/KirillKozlovsky

I guess this thread is already too old, but the question is interesting. The short words you listed have the ó instead of o because the syllable there is closed, i.e. ends in a consonant. The /o/ in closed syllables historically first became long and then started being pronounced like /u/, but it's still written "ó" because there used to be an /o/ sound in its place. As soon as the syllable becomes open, like in "moja, twoja, stołu", it changes back to o, because the /o/ sound never became long in open syllables. But in góra, the syllable is open and seems to have always been so, and although I've tried looking for the reason o changed to ó there, I couldn't find any useful information about that. If anyone here knows the answer, please reply.

January 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/idanlipin

But there are still words that have o instead, such as 'noc'.

August 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MagdalenaM783725

It can be i am going on a mountain or i am going to the top

January 13, 2017
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