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"Hasta los niños hablan."

Translation:Even the boys speak.

5 years ago

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/werrenskis

I think that hasta means until!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
LuisPlus
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Not in this case. "Until the boys speak" would be "Hasta que los niños hablen".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

Wow. Thanks. This usage of "hasta" is completely new to me. And I always have been confused when we use just "hasta" and when "hasta que".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/magickman
magickman
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But there is another sentence in this module which says 'Hasta ahora, lo oido'. The given translation is 'Until now I hate it'.

Is that an incorrect translation?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
LuisPlus
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The word changes meaning depending on the context. "Hasta ahora" does mean until now.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GRIFFnDOOR

It's "until now" because the words following 'hasta' don't form a complete clause / sentance. In the question it's follwed by "los ninos hablan," which is complete. You'll learn about 'hasta que' later on.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tariqnisarahmed

Hasta + incomplete clause/sentence = Until... Hasta + complete clause/sentence = Even...! Hasta que + complete clause/sentence = Until...

Is that right? Gracias!

Edited: Just came up again in a different lesson under same topic. This time I remembered the rule... I hope it was the rule and not just the answer! ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pangaea2

Thanks for the explanation! Just for a little balance here - On the flip side, when Spanish speakers are learning English they encounter phrases like "Where are you off to?" If you think about the usage of the word "off" in that expression it will help you realize that languages take time to learn. Not everything is going to fall into a neat little rule. We have many idiomatic expressions and word usages that must give English language learners fits :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elderbear

Prepositions seem not to translate directly from language to language. I am rediscovering this with Spanish, and I recall it from Koine Greek decades back.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/buffence
buffence
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hear hear!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sean1798

Making the common mistake, 'until the boys speak', caused me to access this discussion, which is very helpful! 'Hasta' is a great word!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/werrenskis

gracias, Luis...una buena explicación

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pavelnikolov
pavelnikolov
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Why is "Until the kids speak" wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
LuisPlus
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"Hasta" can mean "until" but only when followed by "que": "Hasta que los niños hablen".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ginnaw

Okay, but please help me understand how I could have learned that in this program without making the mistake and reading this comment. I keep doing that. What am I missing? Where do I go to learn these things?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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Unfortunately, I don't think these things on Duolingo except through trial, error, and the comments section. A great idea to add to this site would be a tip before hand. For example, when you get the new sentence a tip could pop up and it would say, "Hasta" can mean "until" but only when followed by "que" and then you would be able to get the question right the first time around and know exactly why and how you are getting the question right.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/klaakan

Another great idea would be if we had a list of ALL the new words we will encounter in the lesson BEFORE, not AFTER the lesson! When we are expected to write the Spanish sentence that she says too quickly and have no idea of the verb she is using in this lesson, for instance, it is NOT FAIR!!!!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DuoTongue

I feel the same way...though I think a bit differently. Perhaps the idea is for students to be more on their toes, to be searching (rather earnestly) for the correct word. (I know Rosetta Stone forces students to do this, though I think it goes too far and does not provide enough guidance.) It is fair, since no one but us said we should be able to get a perfect score on the lesson the first time.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sheridend

I like this idea to give us a list of new words/phrases before the lesson starts, rather than at the end. I already know some spanish, so I am finding this program good to remind me of it. However, for a new person, it would be difficult to figure out some of this.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/buffence
buffence
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I agree, it really irkes me to finish less a heart, when the rule was never explained! Ah well...can't complain, it's bloody good for a free website

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melooley
Melooley
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If it really does irk you to finish without all your hearts, you can always immediately repeat the lesson and (hopefully) exceed your first score. That said, we all know the scores don't matter, so it might help to think of this as a way to practice being less than perfect--which is actually a really important skill when learning a language. It's not a bug, it's a feature! (And yeah, it really is bloody good for a free website!)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mcdx3
mcdx3
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aren't you learning it right now? on duolingo? the discussion is a learning tool too. I wouldn't worry about whether you learn via the lesson or the discussion, the point is YOU'RE LEARNING. And you'll probably remember better from having read messages and really thought it about than from just picking an answer on a test. It's more like real life this way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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This is actually a more natural way to learn languages than having the translation, etc. beforehand. In real life situations, you have to guess. I volunteer to teach English as a second language, and I always have my students read or listen first, then go over the vocabulary afterwards. It's amazing how much you can figure out from context.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glilley

Thank you. But what about in the case of 'hasta la vista' or 'hasta luego'?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/priella1

Yep. my same thought, there.

I chose "hasta" because of:

Hasta Luego = Until Later

and

Hasta Mañana = Until Tomorrow

and

Hasta la vista = Until we see each other again

((ps i am not giving a word for word translation.. that is what they all three basically mean when translated into English.. if not things start sounding a bit quirky)) lol

so there has to be more as to it why should we say "Hasta Que"


Even these boys speak sounds like..

"ohmehgawd!? I just figured out males, have vocal chords that.. get this.. they use to.. speak with... wicked right?!? D:?!"

lol... okok over dramatizing it there..

but you get the picture.. lol...

Until the boys speak... seems to make more sense..


Different Languages Different Ways of Doing Things is to be Expected.

I am not arguing if it's really that way...

I would like to understand better. this rule that has be completely dumb-founded here, is all. lol


I would appreciate the reasoning behind the rule.. I am sure it will assist me and probably many others along the way. Thanks for any help there..

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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An awkward sentence in Spanish and English?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/buffence
buffence
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But that can be said of most sentences on here- they come up with all kinds of odd combos, however, it is not because you will realistically need these phrases, it's because they are introducing useful grammar and vocabulary in a repetitive way with many combinations, in order to concrete it in your mind. It's a really clever and effective method I think

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mcdx3
mcdx3
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Lisa: I can't believe all the gossip in this school! Talca: I know! Even the boys talk.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lised65

nice example.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alruvil
Alruvil
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You could translate "The dolls even talk!" like "Las muñecas hasta hablan!" but would be more natural to use "incluso" instead of "hasta" in this case. Then we would have "Las muñecas incluso hablan!".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrahamRawlinson

Yeh, I can imagine 'even the boys talk', a joke, 'Mr Biggs is such a lousy teacher even the boys talk' , or such a good teacher! ;-) But on hasta, my guess is the regional variations will be huge, sometimes when learning a language it is best not to be fussed about detail, if you can imagine what you might say you can bet somewhere they say it! Be about right eh?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cristinabanta

I'm just wondering if it's a saying or something.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mcdx3
mcdx3
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For those complaining about how the meaning of hasta makes no sense, keep in mind: the use of "even" doesn't make sense in English either, yet we understand. 'Even' means: equal, flat, the same, balanced. Yet somehow through common usage it makes sense to us. The only way words like hasta will make sense is to continue to practice them in the many different ways that they are used.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lised65

Yeah, English can arm wrestle Spanish in 5 seconds flat when it comes to exceptions to the rules. We're just used our own quirkiness!.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lised65

this is a useful conversation, but no-one has yet answered why, if hasta needs to be followed by que to mean "until", does hasta luego mean "until later".....??

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quis_lib_duo
quis_lib_duo
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I think GRIFFnDOOR does explain it above, one needs the "que" if a complete clause follows the "hasta".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AkeemJ.A.S

What are complete and incomplete clauses? English doesn't make as much fuss about grammatical nuances as French and Spanish seem to.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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Yes, "Hasta luego" literally means "Until later"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anitka43
anitka43
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Why is the only correct answer in the mutiple choice question "Even the boys speak"? Shouldn't "Even the children speak" also be accepted? It is one of the choices given

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

yes, niños can refer to "boys" or a group of boys and girls together (and thus, children). I think you should report it with the "my answer should be accepted" option.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nokkenbuer

This one was annoying and I got it wrong because the new word, hasta, showed up for the first time here in my lesson. However, it was not highlighted, nor were any of the other words. Is this some sort of glitch? Or am I missing something?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nokkenbuer

Great, and now in multiple choice,apparently "Even the children speak." is not one of the correct answers.

4 years ago