"Quién tiene pan no tiene dientes y quién no tiene dientes tiene pan."

Translation:He who has bread does not have teeth and he who does not have teeth has bread.

January 13, 2013

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rycallah80

This is a machine-gun of a sentence in Spanish if I ever heard one.

January 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LEGEND

True.

January 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wonderboy6

Haha a tongue twister or what!

June 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/acleverkitten

These just keep getting worse and worse.

February 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lesliewilman

The whole point of the saying is lost when the two halves are just repetition. The second half should be "y quién sí tiene dientes no tiene pan."

February 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SevenYearIllini

Is this supposed to mean something? Am I missing something?

March 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CileSuns

It is idiomatic. It means that usually someone who has money/stuff doesn't appreciate it, while someone who could appreciate it can't buy/have it. At least, in Italian the saying is pretty much the same and that's what it means.

May 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/virzak

I said ¨whoever¨ is it wrong?

March 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jefffaust

It should be OK. We need to add 'he' to have it make sense in English, and I see using 'whoever' as the same.

May 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stoneystone

Whoever is much more grammatically correct. The 'who' correct solution is a terrible sentence.

July 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ddesgagne

The team at Duolingo must have SO much fun making up some of these sentences.

May 29, 2013
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