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  5. "Quién tiene pan no tiene die…

"Quién tiene pan no tiene dientes y quién no tiene dientes tiene pan."

Translation:He who has bread does not have teeth and he who does not have teeth has bread.

January 13, 2013

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rycallah80

This is a machine-gun of a sentence in Spanish if I ever heard one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wonderboy6

Haha a tongue twister or what!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/acleverkitten

These just keep getting worse and worse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lesliewilman

The whole point of the saying is lost when the two halves are just repetition. The second half should be "y quién sí tiene dientes no tiene pan."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SevenYearIllini

Is this supposed to mean something? Am I missing something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CileSuns

It is idiomatic. It means that usually someone who has money/stuff doesn't appreciate it, while someone who could appreciate it can't buy/have it. At least, in Italian the saying is pretty much the same and that's what it means.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/virzak

I said ¨whoever¨ is it wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jefffaust

It should be OK. We need to add 'he' to have it make sense in English, and I see using 'whoever' as the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stoneystone

Whoever is much more grammatically correct. The 'who' correct solution is a terrible sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ddesgagne

The team at Duolingo must have SO much fun making up some of these sentences.

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