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"Creo que tienes razón."

Translation:I believe you are right.

4 years ago

80 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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"Tienes razón" (You have reason) is the common way of saying "You are right" in Spanish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/djnumbers
djnumbers
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Good job on the preemptive explication of that idiom. You saved the literal translators their angry thumbtaps.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/--shaun--

Urrrgh, I find myself trying to guess which translation DL wants. Usually I would translate it as "I believe you are right", but experience has taught me that DL prefers (or at least is more likely to accept) literal translations... not in this case :/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LWSChristlover
LWSChristlover
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Does Duo accept "I think you're right"? That's what I would say in English. Not "I believe that you are correct" (or instead of "correct", "right"). It's a pretty formal sentence, but that is the main answer that Duo will accept.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Leogee101

"I think..." is accepted.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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Nickolas I had to peek to answer correctly. I hope I remember this translation in the future.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TibbytheCa

sopa de macaco uma delicia!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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Side note: the negative counterpart to this sentence would be: "(Yo) no creo que tengas razón." The construct no creer que requires a subjunctive verb. If you don't understand the subjunctive, google it, or wait until you reach the subjunctive skill on the tree (and then probably google it as well—it really is quite tough to understand).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Highways
Highways
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O también:

  • Creo que no tienes razón.

If you use the subjunctive remains a possibility that the other person is right, but you don't know it certainly.

This one reflect that you know it perfectly, but you say it in a polite way.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brownaj01

Why wouldn't the affirmative sentence also be subjunctive? I thought you use the subjunctive when there is doubt. Creo que tengas razon - that isn't right?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Coayuco
Coayuco
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tienes razón = you are right, creó que tienes razón = I believe you are right. The first case is a declaration of truth, the second is a declaration of opinion.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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"Creo" has no accent because the "e" is stressed, not the "o." If you were to stress the "o" (and put the accent on it), it would mean "He created" (Él creó) from the verb "crear." (Crear <-> To create, Creer <-> To believe)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pnapthine
Pnapthine
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Yes, and another common way of saying "you are correct", but that was not given as correct (or right) by duolingo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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Tienes razón. ¿Lo has reportado? (Did you report it?)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pnapthine
Pnapthine
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No, sorry - but at least i now know what the flag is for on the android app. Will do so in future, thx

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeredithNa
MeredithNa
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I reported it

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/athalaberhtaz
athalaberhtaz
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Also in French, avoir raison.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris913144

WHY???????

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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Because it's an idiomatic expression.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mangybum

So how come I cannot say it just so? I believe that you have reason.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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Because "you have reason" does not make sense in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brownin329

I believe you have a reason makes more sense but I guess the word una would be involved

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jozef.K.
Jozef.K.
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I believe that you are right = I believe that you have reason.

One of the definitions of reason in English is: "sound judgment; good sense."

It is both a literal and accurate translation. Even if it is more common to say "I believe that you are right" in English, it is not incorrect or unheard of to say it as "I believe that you have reason." There is nothing wrong with interpreting a language literally if it helps you remember how something is said. I find it less useful to say "this entire sentence basically means this" rather than understanding the individual parts mean and then dissecting their meaning in the context of another language's expressions. Why not accept the answer and include "another way of saying this is..." underneath?

Trial and error questions suck.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/prof_t-bake

Couldn't tienes razón also be translated as "You have a point?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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I would translate "You have a point" as "No te falta razón" (literally, "You're not lacking reason"), since what you're really saying is "You aren't wrong."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

They're not very close literally, but idiomatically, I agree that they convey very similar ideas.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zcggcz2

Why is it not in subjunctive? I only believe you are right, but I am not sure of it...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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When the main clause is either 'pensar' or 'creer', the subjunctive is not used because True statements do not take the subjunctive in affirmative sentences or questions, but DO take it in the negative form. When the person doing the talking believes or thinks something is true, there is NO doubt

This rule is true most of the time, but if the person speaking really does have doubt, the subjunctive would be used. However that contradicts what the person is saying, and the listener would take it that the person speaking is not sure.

If you ask a question to someone, and you yourself have doubt, you could use the subjunctive.

IE : Do you believe she is pretty?' ¿crees que ella es bonita? (Indicative, affirmative, no doubt)

¿crees que ella sea bonita? Here the speaker (himself or herself) doesn't believe that she is pretty.

Here is a pretty good reference and see page 12. But remember, ever little nuance is not covered. http://notesinspanish.com/files/NIS-Super-Simple-Subjunctive.pdf

íBuena Suerte!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zcggcz2

That actually makes quite a bit of sense. Even if the person may or not be right, you know for sure that you think they are right. Gotcha.

Thank you for the link as well. Buena Suerte!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/8stringfan

Nice explanation!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Noilzz
Noilzz
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How to say ''You have a reason'' in espanol?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

I would imagine you keep the article, ie Tienes una razón.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Coayuco
Coayuco
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"Tener motivos" and "tener una razón" would both convey the idea. However, like in English, when you say "motivos" or "motives" there is the implication of something that is either very complex or to be kept hidden. "Una razón" is a reason that you'd be willing, or at least able, to explain.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

I was taught to use "razón" to talk about the philosophical sense of "reason" (rightness or rationality), with "causa" being the preferred word for expressing "to have a good reason to do something". I take it you're a native speaker, so maybe you can comment on this? (I wrote a longer note below on the subject, giving some examples.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/QuirkyRabbit

I have heard "tener motivos" to mean having reasons for doing something.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaLanay

So, I understand that "tienes razon" means you're right. What I don't understand is why subjunctive isn't triggered by the "creo que". The person isn't entirely sure, so the statement isn't factual, so present shouldn't be used in the sentence.....right? What am I not understanding?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espanola_amanda

"Creo que" doesn't trigger subjunctive, but "No creo que" would, as detailed in another response above, and in the link that jfGor provided. Be careful about using sweeping generalizations to make grammatical decisions. For example, the difference between ser and estar is not always explained by permanent vs. temporary; likewise, the subjunctive is not always used in situations where you might think the speaker isn't sure.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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Hi Anna, It is hard for me too. I am not advanced, but some one gave me this link. It might help. Look at rule number 5. If not you might be able to google search for more info.

http://notesinspanish.com/files/NIS-Super-Simple-Subjunctive.pdf

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdhicks1
cdhicks1
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I believe that you have reason. Ok Dl says wrong.

But it seems to me that this would be ok if the sentence continued with an idea. Such as; Creo que tienes razon estar triste.

reflexiones?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

So, first of all, "Creo que tienes razon estar triste," is missing a preposition. (And an accent.) It would have to be something like "razón para estar".

Second, I think it is at least less-common, if not wrong, to use razón in this sense. Razón means reason in a philosophical sense -- rationality / reasonableness. An argument has reason if it is properly constructed, with the conclusion following rationally from the premises. If I wanted to say the thing you're trying to say there, I'd use "causa".

The reason I used "para" above is that, IIRC, with "causa", you use "causa de" if you want to talk about the cause of something; "causa por" if you're introducing a second clause about the thing being caused; and "causa para" if you want to talk about a "reason for" acting somehow. Examples drawn from WordReference ( http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=causa ) and Google Translate (just punch in "causa" by itself and translate to English):

La causa del accidente era el exceso de velocidad. The cause of the accident was speeding.

La escasez de recursos fue la causa por la que abandonó la empresa. The lack of resources was the reason why he left the company.

No había causa para reaccionar como lo has hecho. There was no reason to react as you did. Literally closer to, "as you have done it," but that sounds weird in English. I think the "lo has hecho" phrasing here comes from the fact that a reaction is a thing you do in Spanish (hacer), rather than a thing you have.

I'd phrase your sentence as one of these:

Creo que tienes causa para estar triste. I believe you have reason to be sad.

Creo que hay causa por la que estás triste. I believe there is reason for you to be sad.

Possibly a native speaker can correct me if I misunderstand the differences among causa / razón / motivo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

My wife is no language expert but she is a native Spanish speaker. She uses "Tienes razon" to tell me I am right. She doesn't use it often, but that is another subject all together.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Yup, that's correct. Or, more aptly: ¡Tienes razón!

Samsta explained the idiom way up top. My long comment was explaining the problem with trying to use "razón" to mean "reason" in the sense of cause / motivation, as opposed to rationality / reasonableness, in response to somebody suggesting that as an interpretation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Highways
Highways
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Lucky man! Mine always says to me: ¡¡No tienes razón!! :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Herb13
Herb13
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Excellent analysis, aurosharman. I for one genuinely appreciate your thoroughness. I always learn a lot from you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Highways
Highways
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No differences among 'razón' y 'motivo'. But it is slightly different with 'causa'

The followings sentences has the same meaning:

  • Creo que tienes razónes para estar triste. (Best in plural)
  • Creo que tienes motivos para estar triste. (Best in plural as before)

But,

Creo que tiene que haber una causa para estar triste.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I put "I think that you are reasonable." That makes sense to me, but it was marked wrong. Is it because this sentence is idiomatic?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrbenji

"you have a point" is a more accurate translation. There's a difference... you can have a point without being right, although often both can be true. "Eres correcto" would be a more accurate term to translate "you are right."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yurirojassalazar

Soy peruano y para mi lo mas adecuado y siempre lo he escuchado es you are right .

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ichteltelch
ichteltelch
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Hitler had his reasons too… Doesn't mean he was right. Aber er war rechts. Languages are messed up!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J9Z
J9Z
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Ok, I get "you are right," but I also thought I could say "I believe you make sense" but Duo said no. I went out on a limb with an idiomatic translation which is how I've always thought tiene razon was used.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espanola_amanda

"To make sense" is "tener sentido" in Spanish. The meaning for that is slightly different than "to be right (tener razón)".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stokeysam
stokeysam
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Why not 'cause'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seattle_USA
Seattle_USA
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I wrote, "I believe your reason", it gave me: "I believe you've reason."(sic) and "I believe you are right"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/david.godfrey

So "¿Tengo razón?" means "Am I right?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yurirojassalazar

Julio flores you are right bien explicado

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RodolfoDeA6
RodolfoDeA6
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Eso es lo que siempre dijo a mi esposa

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cainau
cainauPlus
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Should "I believe you are reasonable" be an accepted translation? I.e. you have reason -> you are reasonable? It was marked incorrect 2016-12-25.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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"Tener razón" is an idiomatic expression. It means "to be right," rather than "to be reasonable." See the entries and examples at http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/tener%20raz%C3%B3n´and http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=tener%20raz%C3%B3n.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yuncong.zhang

"I believe that you have a reason" is it correct? I think there should be "a" in front of reason. Not a native English speaker, just want to check....

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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If the sentence is something like "I believe that you have a reason for your behavior," the construction of the sentence is correct - but it means something entirely different than ""Creo que tienes razón. "

"Tener razón" is an idiomatic expression, which is the equivalent of "to be right" in English. See the entries and examples at http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/tener%20raz%C3%B3n´and http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=tener%20raz%C3%B3n.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yuncong.zhang

thank you

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The_Higgs_Boson

i think that you make sense... i know it's not literal, but should be right.. right ?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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No. "To make sense" is not the same as "to be right," which is the appropriate translation of this idiomatic expression (http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Tener%20razon).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamcartwright.

would i believe you are correct work too????

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charles924768

Feel DL teaches proper spanish, but somrtimes spanish no one uses. Maybe time to drill down a little further depending on region instead of one teaching for the whole world.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KimBlix
KimBlix
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Where did I go wrong with this?

"I think that you have a reason".

Creo can be "I think" and "razón" means "reason", no?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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"Tener razón" is a common idiomatic expression meaning "to be right." (See http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/tener%20raz%C3%B3n.) As with other idiomatic expressions, if it does not make sense to you, you need to memorize it and use it as intended in the language of origin.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KimBlix
KimBlix
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Yeah, you are right ofcourse.

I was just wondering, if I where to say "I think that you have a reason", how would I say that?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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"I think that you have a reason" would be a rather peculiar thing to say in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KimBlix
KimBlix
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Peculiar or not, it is a valid sentence and I can certainly construct circumstances where it would make perfect sense to say it.

Whatever, it is not important. I just feel that a literal translation should also be valid for a idiom if that literal translation can be used in some circumstance and the chapter is not idiom specific.

Even with a literal translation I would be wrong though, i think. What I tried would probably be translated into "Creo que tienes UN razón.", which is different.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConfettiChamber

mmm . . . "I think you have a point" isn't an acceptable translation? I wonder if it would accept "I believe you have a point."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Smilinsteve7256

I believe you have a reason... was denied? Im angry...now all of a sudden its idiomatic too?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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I'm not sure why people object to Duolingo teaching idioms. Would you prefer to learn all your idioms in the wild, without any previous indication that they, in fact, exist?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanLee0

Second on the prompt, ie reason, should be accepted.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris913144

Why does you have reason mean you are right when they mean completely different things

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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This is a standard idiomatic expression which does, indeed, mean "you are right." Please read the top comment.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WillManley84

Whats wrong with "I believe you have it right"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottDwane
ScottDwane
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I think that you have it right. Anybody disagree with this translation?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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There are idiomatic expressions with tener. This is one of them and besides there is no it in the sentence.

tener razón to be right

There are quite a few of these expressions. One has to memorize them.

http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/tenexp.htm

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeredithNa
MeredithNa
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It is incorrect. You need the indirect object "lo". :-)

2 years ago