"моя ложка"

Translation:my spoon

1/9/2016, 6:43:03 PM

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Misakachi
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Pronunciation? Spoon is spelt with a «Ж» but honestly it sound like «Ш» It sounds like "loshka". Is this correct? If so, why does «Ж» sound, sometimes sound like «Ш» like in «Мужчина»?

1/9/2016, 6:43:04 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Mutusen
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The Ж in ложка sounds exactly like a Ш because of assimilation. The following consonant (К) is voiceless, so Ж becomes voiceless too.

Мужчина is another matter, in this word жч is pronounced as Щ. I think you can consider this as an exception.

1/9/2016, 6:51:03 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Misakachi
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Ah! Thank you! I understand now! :D

1/9/2016, 6:56:30 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/arod2591

Is too big.

3/31/2016, 2:12:40 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Nb982
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Ужасное произношение. лОжка, а не ложкА. Поменяйте пожалуйста эту ужасную женщину, верните прежнюю. Много слов говорит совершенно не правильно

9/9/2018, 5:47:19 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim5602
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First time I saw it I thought it was bed, because it reminds me of the polish łóżko!

10/21/2016, 3:21:13 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverMundy

I notice that when the word ложка is pronounced alone the Duolingo voice renders the initial consonant almost as a 'w', whereas when the word is part of a sentence, as here, the л is more or less like an English 'l'. Is this a quirk of the software or does it genuinely represent what happens in actual Russian usage? I understand that there is a close relation between 'l' and 'w' in some other Slavonic languages, such as Polish where (I believe) the sound 'w' is rendered by an 'l' with a diagonal stroke through it.

6/16/2017, 12:05:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/dirckk
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The "hard" L in Russian is pretty strongly velarized, and often transcribed /ɫ/. Unlike the other hard consonants—which are just lacking the palatalization of their soft twin—hard L has a bunching at the back of the tongue, further back than the palatalization of the "soft" consonants. When this occurs in other languages it's often called "dark L". I use a similarly-dark L in my native American English, and it's so dark that nonnative speakers often hear my /l/ as /w/.

You're right that there's some interplay here throughout the Slavic languages. I believe that Polish used to have a distinction between soft ⟨l⟩ /l~lʲ/ and hard ⟨ł⟩ /ɫ/, but that hard L eventually got so "dark" that it became [w]; the spelling remained unchanged. Similar things happened in Brazilian Portuguese, in Old French (think "journal" --> "journaux"), and in certain dialects of English like Philadelphia.

For more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_L

7/31/2017, 7:23:15 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/GaborBihary
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A similar sound is written as o or u in Serb and in Polish respectively, in certain positions. Serb: Beograd. Dutch: Gouda.

9/18/2018, 8:23:03 PM
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