https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7

Fantastic Features We Don't Have In The English Language

Usagiboy7
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edited

Time-Independence
Clusivity
Absolute Direction
Evidentiality (btw I believe Japanese has evidentiality)

This Video talks about those feature in depth.

  1. What do you like about another language that doesn't exist in your native language?

  2. And the question posed in the video at the end is this: Can you think of a brand new language feature that every language should have, but doesn't? So, my language learning, Duo community, can you?

  3. Also, feel free to discuss the four features introduced in the video.

One thing I like about Japanese is that a person can indicate with the grammar whether or not they want feedback on what they are saying. :D

I'd really like a Contexts feature. Something that brought our attention to a multitude of contexts. It would require a whole cultural shift to accommodate it. Often, we aren't asked to state the context in which we are speaking, it is considered, implied. But, I'm doing research on language right now and there are all sorts of contexts and often this is where misunderstandings happened. The speaker and listener are drawing from different contexts when encoding and decoding the message. History (time/place) is a context. Cultures are a context. So, some sort of linguistically embedded situatedness.

What I liked about the video was the absolute direction. I have NO sense of direction. In fact, when I try to calculate directions it is often safest to go with the opposite of my intuition. True story.

2 years ago

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TheHockeyist

In Russian, there are a whole lot of ways to say "to go" depending on what exactly is going on. It depends on if you are going on foot, going by vehicle, a return trip or a unidirectional trip, a habitual trip, etc., not to mention most verbs have perfective and imperfective aspects. There's always a chapter on "to go" in Russian textbooks, usually titled "Verbs of Motion".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bufferz91

polish is very similar here :') i hate it now because i have not mastered it but I'm sure once i have i will appreciate it!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheHockeyist

I know what it's like. Good luck!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattMoran01

Yes, in polish, there can be 6 different ways to say the same word

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rachael.cr3
rachael.cr3
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Ohhhh, verbs of motion. That brings me back to the most frustrating days of my college Russian classes. Shudder. I still don't quite have them straight.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheHockeyist

I'm getting there.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RikSha
RikSha
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Don't I know it! Facing skill 'verbs of motion' is even worse than 'adverbs'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheHockeyist

Yep. Adverbs don't change their forms at all!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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Inclusive and exclusive forms of "we."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucBE
LucBE
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Cherokee!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kunstkritik
Kunstkritik
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How do you answer a negated question?

In german and some other languages you can say a form of yes that implies that "yes you did something"

  • A: Du hast deine Hausaufgaben nicht gemacht, oder?
  • B: Doch!

translation: A: You didn't do your homework, did you? B: Yes, (I did)

In english it seems like you have to add more stuff to your answer or otherwise it could be

  • "yes, (I didn't do my homework)" or "yes (I did)" OR
  • no, I did my homework or "no I didn't"
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bufferz91

You can not answer "yes, i did not do my homework" to that question i am unsure of the rule but the logic does not make sense in my brain as a native speaker. Also, you can simply say 'no' alone but it doesn't sound quite right to say yes alone to this question.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kunstkritik
Kunstkritik
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well see, these kind of questions are always weird to answer. At least it is easier in german imo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bufferz91

yes you are correct!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AureliaUK
AureliaUK
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But you can say, "Yes! We Have No Bananas".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yes!_We_Have_No_Bananas

:)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence
chilvence
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I actually find the word 'doch' kind of smug. An English person can answer the question "You didn't do your homework did you" With just as few syllables as a German person could. You'd just say "diiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiid!!!!". The extra i's are to denote the part where you would wildly fluctuate your voice pitch to fully demonstrate your indignation.

See also: nah-ahh, yeah-heh, did-not, did-too

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pratyush.
Pratyush.
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Hindi has particle which describes a lot of things which are difficult to translate in English like confirmatory particle na works like Japanese 'ne' usually put at the end of sentence to ask from listener. Inclusive particle bhi which works like Japanese 'mo', and 'wala' which corresponds to 'mono' or 'koto' of Japanese., then there is 'ka' usually used for making adjective and describing possession like 'No' of Japanese. And' aur' works like 'motto' . It is strange but one to one translation between Japanese and hindi are more easier that with English and either of them. I miss those features in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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That's really cool to know.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TimothyAspeslagh

In dutch we have a thing called "verkleinwoorden" (aka diminuitives), when talking about small things, we add a suffix to express the tininess. I don't recall the english language using these while we use it a lot in the dutch language.

E.g.

De bal -> Het balletje De hond -> Het hondje Het glas -> Het glaasje

If I think about the suffix for too long it starts to sound weird

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TimothyAspeslagh

Apparently english does have some diminuitives but their use is limited e.g. cigar -> cigarette duck -> duckling

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence
chilvence
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We actually use this a lot... the difference is, we use it for practically any reason whatsoever

Dog - Doggy

Duck - Ducky

Chicken - Chicky

Bird - Birdie

Horse - Horsie

Towel - Towelie ...

If something is small or cute, add 'ee' to the end, however you want to spell it. We've yet to invent a grammatical rule for it and call it diminutives, but they exist for certain.

'ee' Also magically makes adjectives:

Salt - Salty

Lemon - Lemony

Rock - Rocky

Gravel - Gravelly

Cage - Cagey

Sometimes 'ee' even makes nouns, especially, if you are Australian:

Old - Oldie

Good - Goody

Chip - Chippie

Bike - Bikie

Food - Foodie

"ee" can be used on pretty much any random name of any person, see if you can find the root name of all of:

Freddy, Johnny, Davey, Billy, Tommy, Jimmy, Timmy, Tammy, Jennie, Laurie, Lenny, Larry, Lemmy, Harry, Henry, Howie, Julie, Jessie, Jamie, Jerry, Charlie, Donny, Danny, Frankie, Mary, Mandy, Maggy, Mikey, Andy, Ally, Tony, Joni...

Try it. Put 'ee' on the end of any random word. Doesn't matter if it is in the dictionary, 9 times out of 10, it will actually mean something to someone, even if they have never heard it before and look at you like you are insane :)

Well, I thought it was funny.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gargantarant

I thought it was funny too. I think we should all follow Australia's lead and calls bikes Bikies. It just sounds tougher.

Also, "ee" added means "person who got something done to them" sometimes

Abductee = got abducted Refugee = seeking refuge

but not always:

punchee = got punched stabee = got stabbed holocaustee = got holocausted

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zzzzz...
Zzzzz...
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This is a bit off the topic, but did you know that cows are able to mimic certain aspects of human language? There was a study in Finland that revealed that cows repeat dialectal features. It would be interesting to know, how cows in countries where tonal languages are spoken moo. And yes, I know I am extremely strange (and more than slightly language-obsessed).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-oizys-

that is interesting. i wonder if other (domesticated?) animals do this as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bufferz91
  1. I am currently learning Polish and I like the high inflection aspect.

  2. I'm not sure if this already a language feature but what if 'silence' could play some role in grammar perhaps If length of time between clicks changed the meaning or the word etc etc.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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Japanese has timing called "Mora". A word can change depending on whether a sound is held out for two beats of sound or one. That has kind of a dialectical relationship with silence. But, I'm not sure if it would exactly count as silence itself. Cool concept though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence
chilvence
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Silence is already a feature of I would wager every language. Comic timing, suspense, dramatic pause, whatever guise it might come under - silence is an integral part of communication.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chirelchirel
chirelchirel
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In Finnish we have long and short phonemes, and since plosives are pretty much just silence, we have three different kinds of silences that can be written (k, p, t) that have two different lengths (k/kk, p/pp, t/tt) we also have the glottal stop (which is yet another kind of silence, but there's no letter for it) that really changes the meaning of many words (and make some jokes impossible to work in speech, they only work written form).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Taurendil
Taurendil
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Which jokes?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chirelchirel
chirelchirel
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For example anything with Anna Puu in it :D The imperative form anna has the glottal stop at the end, but the name Anna doesn't.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chirelchirel
chirelchirel
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Oh, I forgot, there are some (one?) dialect(s) where the glottal stop is not used. I'm not sure which one… maybe somewhere around Turku.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Taurendil
Taurendil
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Now I see what you meant ^_^ But I don't know about the dialects... Could be. This also works with just the name/word anna.

-Anna, annapa Annan manna.

-Annanko?

-Kyllä, Annan.

-Siis minäkö annan?

This for words with both meanings. Usually there's no problem in understanding these right.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chirelchirel
chirelchirel
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Yes this is similar, but the confusion is between 1st person present tense and genitive of the name Anna.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/E-Baloo
E-Baloo
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I would love to have 3 types of we. me and someone else, me and you, and me you and someone else. I heard there is language that does that but I can't remember which.

2 years ago
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