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https://www.duolingo.com/mjschel

Portuguese language emblem

For Portuguese, it shows the Brazilian flag. Real quick, I'm going to clear up a couple things that I'm pretty sure at least one person is going to put in the comments: I know that Brazil speaks Portuguese. Now, you'd think that Duoling would put the Portuguese flag, rather than the Brazilian, because Brazil was originally a colony of Portugal, hence the reason why the speak Portuguese, not Spanish, like the majority of South America. The only reason that I can come up with is that the Brazilian flag is simpler the the Portuguese flag. If anyone knows, please tell me.

2
2 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TheHockeyist

I'm sure one reason is that Brazil is more populous and more of a global power than Portugal. It's like asking why English has the American flag icon and not the British flag.

9
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FlipWilson5000

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjschel

Are the names of the countries in Portuguese?

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheHockeyist

Yep.

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjschel

Ok, thanks for all your help

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjschel

Thank you, now it makes a lot of sense. It's that kind of thing where you cant think of anything, and then when someone else mentions it, you're like, Ohhhhhhhhhhhhh

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheHockeyist

No prob. Glad I could help.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
Mod
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From what I have read here in the forums, Duolingo teaches Brazilian Portuguese. Hence the Brazilian flag.

EDIT and they teach Brazilian Portuguese for exactly the reasons TheHockeyist mentioned.

8
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjschel

And thank you for confirming it!

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iwc2ufan
iwc2ufan
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More than that, Brazilian Portuguese is very different than European Portuguese - much more than UK and US English or Spain's Spanish and the various types of Spanish in South and Central America. I can see why they did it. With English or Spanish, they could have picked almost any flag from the Spanish and English speaking countries, but with Portuguese, using the one that actually matches makes complete sense.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/htimsmr

Most likely, the course is based on the Brazilian dialect of Portuguese. There are far more speakers of Portuguese in Brazil than there are in Portugal, and Brazil, being a major developing economy, is probably of more interest to Duo's sponsors than Portugal. The US flag is used for English learners, for similar reasons.

That said, the Spanish emblem is Spain's flag, despite pretty much the same situation. (Lat Am Dialect, number of speakers in region, developing South Am. economies, etc). No points for consistency, eh?

6
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisPauli1

I wouldn't say it's inconsistent in regards to the Spanish emblem. The US and Brazil are both home to a clear majority of the the worlds native English and Portuguese speaker respectively. Although most of the world's native Spanish speakers live in Latin America, no one single country has a a majority, and there is no flag as far as I know that represents hispanophone Latin America in aggregate. The one country with a clear plurality of native Spanish speakers is Mexico, but most of the world's native speakers aren't Mexican. With no hispanophone country having a clear majority, it makes sense to default to the country of origin, in this case Spain.

3
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vegjjany
vegjjany
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Actually the majoritary language in South America is Portuguese, not Spanish. The brazilian population is numerous enough to exceed all the other countries from South America together. Also, in Suriname is spoken Dutch, in Guyana is spoken English and in French Guyana is spoken French, so the non-lusophone South American population isn't composed completely by Spanish speakers, no counting the monolingual indigenous population (mainly Quichua, Aymara and Guarani speakers), which is pretty significant, mainly present in Bolivia and Peru.

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mjschel

I meant majority of countries, rather than majority of people, but thanks for your input! :)

1
Reply2 years ago