https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot

Is anyone planning on learning language(s) of thier heritage?

DragonPolyglot
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I have found out my ancestors were Welsh, Irish, Norman, and Iroquois. I decided to learn Irish, Welsh, Mohawk (aka Kanyen'kéha) and try learning French because I think all those languages are very much a big part of my heritage. I will have difficulties learning French, I know for a fact, but I decided that to learn where I am from is just as important as learning who I am... So I will do my very best to try French again, and see if I get farther! The other languages, I have no idea what I'll be getting into, but I think that it'll be interesting.... At least I can or will be able to learn 3 of the languages I listed on this site. :)

2 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/no.name.42
no.name.42
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Personally I don't really care if any of my ancestors spoke a language; I don't really see them as a large part of my identity.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr_Eyl
Mr_Eyl
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Ditto. You don't see anyone rushing to learn PIE.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabzerbinatoEng
gabzerbinatoEng
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A lingot for mentioning this not so known language :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr_Eyl
Mr_Eyl
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Thanks! I love highly-inflected languages, so I can't wait to sit down and give it some serious study one day.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KierenMcCormack
KierenMcCormack
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I learned Irish which is where most of my heritage is from, I also just recently started learning dutch because thats where the rest of my heritage comes from

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnIsAPandah

Most of my heritage is from Vietnam. And the Vietnamese course is not out yet soo...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A_User
A_User
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You could always do the reverse tree... :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr_Eyl
Mr_Eyl
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OP, you can still learn Norman, and there are around 100,000 speakers. Give it a go if you want to get closer to your roots.

The Normans were originally Danish, Icelandic and Norwegian settlers in France, so you could always give Old Norse a try, too. Duo also has Danish and Norwegian. :)

It all depends on how far back you're willing to go- 'heritage' is a slippery concept, and becomes even more so the further into history we travel.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot
DragonPolyglot
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Ah, really? I didn't know that. I'll add those to my list too. I should learn Danish and Norwegian, I am already learning Swedish though, so I feel like I should get better at that first since the three are so similar.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheEeveeLord

I plan on learning Romanian when it comes out.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabzerbinatoEng
gabzerbinatoEng
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The only big heritages I know I have are Italian and Dutch. I'll learn German so that I can learn Dutch easily after, and eventually someday I might study Italian, but I confess I have very little interest in it now.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinoForever

I am :) Turkish

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FinoForever

Like I'm taking Turkish is what i meant XD

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stephapus
stephapus
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Although I can communicate in basic Cantonese, I think I'd like to learn how to write more complex sentences in Traditional Chinese and speak on a more sophisticated level :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CodyORB
CodyORB
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I'm learning Irish (and soon Welsh), which is where all my ancestors are from :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roman_Huczok
Roman_Huczok
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I'm learning Ukrainian. I have a friend learning Irish, and Welsh is another Celtic language, and from what they've said I wouldn't underestimate them (spelling system even weirder than English, alien grammar system, etc). As for Mohawk, two things: 1. don't expect amazing resources and 2. I've been learning Lakota, it's incredibly hard, even places where you would expect there to be a cognate there isn't, e.g. horse is šúŋkawakȟaŋ. If you're serious about learning Mohawk you need to be passionate about it and willing to work very hard. Personally I hope you do.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr_Eyl
Mr_Eyl
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Irish and Welsh spelling might seem weird but, unlike English, they both have almost completely regular pronunciation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roman_Huczok
Roman_Huczok
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Really? OK, that slightly pushes Irish up my wish list.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

The pronunciation of Irish words is probably more regular than English, but it is far from "completely regular", aside altogether from the fact that there are considerable differences in the pronunciation used in different regions of the country - you can see this demonstrated on teanglann.ie a site that houses a pronunciation database where you can hear the different regional pronunciations of the root form of thousands of words.

This myth of "regular pronunciation" has lead many learners to fall into the trap of believing that the phonologies that they read on various internet sites are always correct, and that some of the pronunciations on Duolingo are wrong because they don't match these phonological rules. While there are a number of problems with the Irish audio on Duolingo, much of the criticism is wrong, because the speaker is using perfectly normal Irish pronunciations that don't match the "regular pronunciation" that learners have been lead to expect.

Here are some examples that show particularly marked differences between the regional pronunciations, though it is worth noting that many of these differences are consistent within a particular region (so pronunciation in Ulster is largely consistent, and pronunciation in Munster is largely consistent, etc).

Dog = Madra
Hill = Cnoc
Brother = Deartháir.

Note that this shouldn't be taken as a warning against studying Irish - just a warning that you must always give preference to spoken Irish over written Irish when it comes to pronunciation, and that presents a problem for learners, especially outside Ireland, where access to Irish speakers is limited, though the Internet has made a massive difference in that regard in the last decade or so.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr_Eyl
Mr_Eyl
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I should have been clearer- I'm aware of dialectal differences, but don't usually feel the need to bring them up when talking about, say, the tregularity of German pronunciation.

Obviously, like any language, Irish has its phonetic differences between dialects, but I was under the impression (and attempying to make the point) that within one's chosen dialect, pronunciation is a lot more regular than that of English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WrigGeor

I have Greek and Scottish heritage, and I'm particularly looking forward to learning Greek. However, there aren't as many resources for learning Scottish Gaelic so it's probably not as likely that I'll learn that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/idshanks
idshanks
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For what it's worth, I'm learning it and I don't really feel strapped for resources.

Teach Yourself Complete Gaelic is quite nice, I'd recommend it.

Blas na Gàidhlig is perhaps my favourite language-learning resource of all time - I wish there were equivalents in every language. Takes you through the phonemes step by step, then teaches you about pronunciation in the context of full words and so on.

learngaelic.net is a great online dictionary with pronunciations for many of the words and phrases. (it's more than just a dictionary but that's my main use of it, so I can't really comment on its other components)

http://www.taic.me.uk/taic.htm - this is a good website, although obviously very poor in terms of formatting (just an old-fashioned website really - the content is good).

Concise Grammar of Scottish Gaelic is also worth a look, it doesn't go into much depth but as a beginner it's a great book for perhaps that exact reason. Very nice for getting your head around some basic concepts and developing the fundamentals.

Give it a go, it's quite doable :P

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jarcher77
jarcher77
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Oh, absolutely. I'm going to learn German, Irish, and Norwegian. Those are high priorities after French and Spanish. I'm also interested in Russian, as that was my grandfather's first language, although he was German (a Volga German).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mlynarova
mlynarova
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Yes. My family background is Jewish and I will start the Hebrew Course as soon as it's available. Also, my fiancé's father is from Romania, so I want to learn Romanian as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rowne
rowne
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My mother grew up in Ireland, so I already speak a little Irish. I'm starting to do the Duolingo course so I can learn some more. I also want to learn Italian (which I've pretty much forgotten), since my father's family is from Italy, and French, since I know lots of people (including my grandmother) that are French/French-Canadian.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
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Russian, my mother's side of the family, I'm already studying. Swedish, my father's side, I'll eventually tackle, although probably not soon--not until after the Russian is good, and probably not until after a few already-partially learned languages (i.e., French, Spanish, Latin, Ancient Greek, maybe Italian) are up to speed. Probably. But maybe I won't be able to resist starting Swedish sooner. Russian and Swedish my grandparents spoke but my parents did not.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SiblingCreature

My father's family was from Russia, and Russian was his first language, however I never learned more than a few words as a child. I'm now correcting that oversight by learning Russian here on Duolingo. :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shadowmere360
Shadowmere360
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My heritage is Irish and English. I already speak English and I studied Irish in school. I have enough Irish to understand well enough. It is a shame that I can't practice Irish everyday because most people in Ireland speak English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DDLFan

I have Swedish, English, Jewish and Italian heritage. So far, I haven't done any of those...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brittalexiswm

I want to learn Welsh, Irish, Danish, Scottish, Faroese, and German, yes. Who has that kind of time though haha. I wanted to learn a west African language also but they are soooo hard to find resources for!

2 years ago
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