"Mam herbatę."

Translation:I have tea.

January 10, 2016

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/poodamoff

Is the pronunciation just a really hard h or is it kind of a k sound at the beginning of herbatę?

March 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mihxal

It is "h" sound and it used to be even harder "h" in the past but nowadays both "h" and "ch" are pronounced in the same way by the vast majority of people.

http://pl.forvo.com/word/herbata/

http://pl.forvo.com/word/chyba/#pl

April 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/missmixie

why does this change from herbata to herbatę>

January 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mihxal

"Herbata" is a feminine noun. You use "mieć" with Accusative.

herbata [Nominative] -> herbatę [Accusative]

January 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/DarekUcello

(Co to jest?) - herbata; (Czego nie mam?) - herbaty; (Czemu się przyglądam?) - herbacie; (Co piję?) - herbatę; (Z czym jem ciasto) - z herbatą

June 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ZosiaD5

Dziękuje .Tak rozumiem lepiej deklinacje

September 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/iokuachanin

In this specific example, is "I" dative?

I am really struggling with understanding "accusative", "dative", "nominative" and "instrumental". Any helpful tips would be greatly appreciated.

March 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
Mod
  • 3

You can take a look here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/16296174 and search for topics about cases, or visit this website here: http://mowicpopolsku.com/polish-grammar/#cases

One thing that you can be sure of: the subject of the sentence is in Nominative, the most basic form. Here it is not visible, because "Mam herbatę" = "Ja mam herbatę", but "ja" is totally redundant as the subject is obvious from the verb's form.

March 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ann889878

I am having is better in this instance

December 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
Mod
  • 3

No it's not. Using "having" for "eating" or "drinking" (as this is what "I am having tea" would mean) is a very specific usage, and a rather weird one, if you think about it. Assuming that it works the same way in other languages is quite risky. And it surely does not work the same way in Polish. "Mam herbatę" is just "I have tea". In my cupboard, for example.

December 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Britgirlabroad

Actually, it is not a weird usage at all - it is what native English speakers say all the time.

'What are you having?' 'I'm having tea' - not in the sense of having it stored in your cupboard but in the sense of drinking it now or shortly.

We often use 'have' where other languages tend to use 'take' as well; for example, when you talk about what you're going to order in a restaurant.

February 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
Mod
  • 3

I guess I shouldn't have written 'weird' like this ;) What I (I guess) meant that it's an idiomatic thing that is used on a daily basis, sure, but if you think about the main meaning of the verb "to have", given the fact that the verb "to eat" is also a basic one, then (at least to a learner of English) it might seem quite strange that you use "have".

Anyway, the main point is that it's risky to assume that such an indiosyncrasy will translate directly into another language.

Although Ann's comment went rather the other way, trying to use "I am having", which means "I am eating", when Present Simple "I have" should be used.

February 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Adrian_the_cow

Nie mam herbatę

January 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
Mod
  • 3

"Nie mam herbaty" :)

January 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DarekUcello

Nie mam (kogo? czego?) herbaty

June 23, 2018
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