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  5. "Я катаюсь на велосипеде."

"Я катаюсь на велосипеде."

Translation:I am riding a bicycle.

January 10, 2016

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joker-62

What is wrong "i am cycling"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Neil985657

Absolutely. Should not be marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

unicycling? tricycling? Going from manic to depressive?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/justinbrisk

From a native: If someone called me and asked what are you doing - I would say "I'm on my bike" or "I'm cycling" and then add " to ......."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/feyMorgaina

From another native speaker: "I am riding a bicycle", "I am riding a bike", "I'm riding a bicycle", or "I'm riding a bike" are all perfectly fine ("I'm riding a bike" might be more common out of these four since English speakers are notoriously lazy speakers and we like to shorten everything we say).

You also don't need to specify "to" unless you want to (or really feel you have to) tell someone exactly where you are going.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/servolock

"катаюсь" is unrecognizable in both the slow and fast audio.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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It's not ideal, but passable to a native ear. What is missing is a more distinct "ю" sound, but since there is no other similarly sounding word in Russian, a native would not get confused. It's not an excuse to keep it in a teaching program though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R_Andersson

Привет всем! According to Wiktionary, ‘to bicycle’ is a verb and I have even used it for myself a couple of times. Should it (‘I am bicycling’) be accepted, or is it just a rare, super-uncommon, archaic/dated/obsolete verb that sound alien to native ears?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keinemeinung

I think even "cycling" is more common than "bicycling", seems like that should also be accepted here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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Even cycling? Not sure what you mean: to me "cycling" is the most natural word for "riding a bicycle". I hope you are not advocating for ugly American "biking", are you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cptchuckle

American here, i hear and use "cycling" much more than "bicycling". One who rides a bicycle on the road is known as a "cyclist"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keinemeinung

Well, I may or may not be an ugly American using ugly American verbs :p According to Merriam-Webster cycle as a verb has the meaning "to ride a cycle; specifically : bicycle"

edit: I do like to think of myself as a semi-handsome American. >


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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My opinion was strictly limited to the word ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keinemeinung

Also I misread your post and apologize, lol. I meant "cycling" sounds a bit foreign to me but I do know it's a common term. I don't see what's wrong with biking, either!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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@keinemeinung:
I think it's one of those British vs. American things. I learnt my English in the UK, and there is something about using "to bike" as a verb that irks me, even though I hear it all the time (I live in the US now).
Meantime I do ride my bike (a motorcycle, that is), and I also cycle ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alkajugl

To me (native American) "I am bicycling" sounds a lot better than "I am cycling," which is a term I have never used or heard..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/servolock

In translations, it seems like there are two extremes. One is the word-for-word translation. The other is the "best equivalent" translation, which uses the most common, sometimes idiomatic way of saying the same thing, in the two languages, but which may be totally unrelated verbally. E.g., "не пуха не пера" which is Russian for "break a leg."

Duolingo stumbles around between these two extremes, frequently allowing, almost inviting mistakes and misleading students. E.g., "техника," which seems to have no single-word equivalence in English except in specific contexts, like "electronics."

I see no solution for these problems except for DL and its students to be more flexible and stop spending so many hours defending one position or another.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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Duolingo stumbles around between these two extremes, frequently allowing, almost inviting mistakes and misleading students.

I don't think it's as frequent as you make it sound. Duolingo tries to default to the most literal translation whenever it does not sound unnatural. This exercise is perfect example: there is nothing unnatural about "riding a bicycle". Sure, you may have an idiomatic "shortcut" in English, but use it at your own peril: it will most likely be added to the database at some point but do not expect it to be the default answer.
On the other hand, a literal translation of idioms like "не пуха не пера" would make absolutely no sense and hence an equivalent idiom is used as a default translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/servolock

It's pretty frequent here on DL, sometimes unavoidable, and it's always irritating to see so much time and space consumed with the point-counterpoint process.

Even this simple sentence can use "I am biking," "I am riding a bike," "I am bicycling," "I am riding a bicycle," I am cycling" and doubtless more, many or most of which can be considered acceptable translations but sometimes are not accepted by DL, which starts a discussion about what should be accepted or should not be, and why. It's these kinds of discussions that are tedious and frustrating to wade through on DL. The point of my post was to encourage people to be a little more flexible in this process.

I used "не пуха не пера" as an extreme case, which I did not find on DL. But if it were on DL it would probably provoke many pages of discussion about what constitutes the best translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex2537

I completely agree, just want to correct: Ни пуха ни пера.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex2537

Oh and another point. I would usually say "Я еду на велосипеде", if I'm going from A to B, кататься is to ride for fun. You can кататься на велосипеде, машине, лошади, качелях, ... etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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@Alex2537

Firstly, thanks for the correction. I have simply copied servolock's mistaken version without paying any attention. It is indeed "ни пуха, ни пера".

Secondly, about ехать vs кататься. I completely agree with you but there is an additional element to that. Russian verbs of motion normally come in pairs - unidirectional and multi-directional (идти-ходить, бежать-бегать, лететь-летать etc.) The latter form is used to describe repeated, round-trip or aimless motion. For unidirectional "ехать" there is a multi-directional counterpart "ездить", which is typically used to describe a usual mode of transportation (as opposed to the one being employed right now.)
"Кататься" из also multi-directional, but unlike "ездить" it has a distinct flavour of aimless or joy riding. (There is also unidirectional "катиться", but it literally means "to roll by itself" and in reference to cycling it means "to coast".)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex2537

@zirkul

I know that, I'm Russian, the only thing is that "кататься" is both unidirectional and multi-directional (using your terms).

Он сейчас катается на машине = He's riding a car for fun right now.

and

Он обычно катается на машине по воскресеньям = He usually rides a car for fun on Sundays.

Sorry, I give more literal translations. English speakers, you are welcome to correct me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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@Alex2537:

"кататься" is both unidirectional and multi-directional (using your terms).
Он сейчас катается на машине = He's riding a car for fun right now.
and
Он обычно катается на машине по воскресеньям = He usually rides a car for fun on Sundays.

No, both of these are typical examples of how multi-directional verbs of motion are used. As I said earlier, the are used to decribe repeated/typical (your second example) or aimless (your first example) motion. A unidirectional verb describes a directed motion: я иду домой, я лечу в Париж, я качусь с горки. Я катаюсь с горки, on the other hand, is a multi-directional case even though it describes what I am doing right now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex2537

@zirkul

OK, maybe I misunderstood you. It's a tricky matter, so no more argument from me. I guess your Russian is pretty good. Maybe see you in another thread :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ger205813

How would you say ' I ride a bicycle' for example telling someone your hobbies?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex2537

Я увлекаюсь катанием на велосипеде or Моё хобби - это катание на велосипеде = My hobby is cycling

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