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  5. "I came to you at night."

"I came to you at night."

Translation:Przyszłam do ciebie w nocy.

January 10, 2016

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/random8042

In English this sounds very sexual, does it in Polish or not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

There is nothing sexual in the sentence. It could be mother saying this to a child. Or a daughter to mother. It could end - you were not there. It could be a friends remembering how one day she came at her place after a party. And it could be sexual.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/les_macarons

I'd say it depends on the context, but unfortunately for that sentence there's not that many possibilities of other interpretations left.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lord_Pengwyn

And i drank your blood


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andyemanu

Is there a reason why I can't use the short form, cię, here, or has it just not been added yet? Also, I haven't quite figured out when to use the short and long forms (ciebie, cię; jego, go; etc.), so if someone could explain it or send a link to some site offering an explanation on it, that would be very kind.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Well, the longer ones are accented, so often they are acceptable, but not that natural. For example, only an accented form can go at the beginning of a sentence.

Also, only an accented form can be used after a preposition. So "do cię" can't work.

And some of them have a separate form for using after a preposition. "to him" will be "do niego", neither "do go" or "do jego" will work (well, "do jego X" can be "to his X").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andyemanu

Bardzo dziękuję!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrijVP

Why "przyszedłam" was not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Because it's not a word.

"przyszedłem" is the masculine form, "przyszłam" is the feminine one.

Many men, usually older ones, say "przyszłem" mistakenly, but I can't imagine any woman using "przyszedłam" seriously, that sounds like a language joke made on purpose.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meikel100

My response, "przyjechałem do ciebie w nocy", should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lord_Pengwyn

For a bite to drink, bla! Bla!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick315035

What's the difference between: Przyjdź Pochodzi Przyszed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

"przyjdź" = "come", 2nd person singular imperative mood (Come to my party Saturday!)

"pochodzi" = "comes" as "originates", 3rd person singular (He comes from Japan)

"przyszedŁ" = "came" (yeah, only literally), 3rd person singular masculine (He came to my party)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kendra800150

Can you use przychodziłem/przychodziłam if it was a recurrent event?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

You can... but would that really use "I came" in English, not some "I used to come" or "I would come"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kendra800150

It depends on context (a general problem with these translations of isolated sentences). In a narrative the simple past could certainly be used for a repeated pattern.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnoldpitt

przychodzic is given as the infinitive. one would suppose that przychodz- is the root but half the time some or all of the -chodz- disappears. Why? we need a whole lesson on this verb


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

"przychodzić" is the imperfective verb, so it would work here if the sentence was "I always used to come to you at night". See the conjugation here: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/przychodzi%C4%87#Conjugation

What we have here is the perfective "przyjść". See the conjugation here: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/przyj%C5%9B%C4%87#Conjugation

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