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"Does the girl have a brother?"

Translation:У девочки есть брат?

January 11, 2016

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ehsan_Mehmed

Why not "брата"?

January 24, 2016

[deactivated user]

    Because the structure of the Russian sentence is not the same as the structure of the English. «Брат» is actually the subject, literally "at girl['s family], is [there a] brother?".

    January 25, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ehsan_Mehmed

    alright, thanks

    January 31, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wr.Catington

    the hint says that girl should be девошка but the answer was девошки, why?

    February 29, 2016

    [deactivated user]

      Де́вочка is the nominative case, but after «у» you use the genitive case.

      March 1, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrisoconn18

      Hi Szeraja, I thought a feminine singular noun ending in a 'а' becomes 'ы' ? why is it 'и' here? i'm a bit confused. I thought, 'mama' becomes' 'мамы' in genitive, or have I got this wrong? thanks for your help! you always explain things really well in the comments.

      May 12, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoamKriten

      It's not because of the gender, but because девочка ends with к. Same for nouns that end with г and х.

      July 24, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johnson449245

      "because девочка ends with к" whaaattt ??

      September 21, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustTimoCraft

      Take a look at the general spelling rules of Russian: http://www.russianlessons.net/grammar/spelling_rules.php In this case, мама becomes мамы because мама ends with an а. Девочка or Девушка become девочки or девушки because the normal ы changes to и after certain letters.

      November 18, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miceal.W

      nice streak

      September 26, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wr.Catington

      Ok, thanks!

      March 3, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmdbt

      I don't understand why you can say either девочки or девушкы! Could someone please explain? Are these two different cases or two accepted spellings or even two different words????

      November 24, 2016

      [deactivated user]

        These are two different words. «Девочки» (nominative case «девочка») refers to the younger girl, «девушки» (nominative case «девушка») refers to the older girls. The exact distinction is a bit blurry: 10-year old girl is definitely «девочка», 20-year old girl is definitely «девушка», for 15-year old girls you can usually use both.

        November 25, 2016

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmdbt

        Great! Thanks! This leads me to another question though: Why is the ending in и for девочки and in ы for девушкы ?

        November 25, 2016

        [deactivated user]

          The correct ending is «девушки», «девушкы» is a mistake.

          If the word ends in -ка (also -га, -ша, -ща, -ча, -ха), the genitive form would have -и. The consonants like К, Г, Х don't have soft/hard distinction in native words, so they are almost never followed by Ы. You can only see a combination like кы, гы, хы in foreign foreign loanwords (e.g. Кыргызстан 'Kyrgyzstan').

          November 25, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmdbt

          Thank you for all your help!

          November 25, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GildoTlahtoa

          It is compulsory use "есть"? I have the impression that sometimes Russians don't use it. Or am I wrong?

          February 3, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dotters

          It is mandatory when the topic of the sentence is the very existence of something (as here).

          February 14, 2016

          [deactivated user]

            I'm typing in US keyboard. I know I can switch to Russian. But I type quicker in English. In any case I was marked wrong for writing est without the soft sing. But the Commas are not accepted. I know I can type estь combing the two, but this is klunky. Should I report this as an error, or live with it.

            May 19, 2017

            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrisoconn18

            I'm a student, so I may well be wrong, but i think the soft 'ь' on the end of 'ест' means to have, but without it, it means you eat. Native speakers might know better though.

            May 19, 2017

            [deactivated user]

              no you are correct. estь is what I'm typing for those answers

              May 19, 2017

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuceliaFoo

              Perhaps est' works. I was under the impression that ' symbolised ь.

              September 7, 2019

              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Verbenaceae

              Yes, there seems to be some bug with this particular word. In general, the transliteration option for the course works quite well and systematically and you can choose whether or not to use the apostrophes for the soft signs, etc (I usually just omit them).

              This word, "есть", however, does not seem to transliterate properly. I've tried all possible variants of latin characters that I can think of and it always gets failed.

              The rest of the course seems to work fine and, fortunately, "есть" seems to occur less frequently as the course progresses.

              June 12, 2017

              [deactivated user]

                thanks a lot!

                June 12, 2017

                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZaidRockso

                Why is it not , " у этого девочки есть брат?

                January 11, 2016

                [deactivated user]

                  «Э́того де́вочки» is ungrammatical, 'this girl' should be «э́той де́вочки» (этой is a feminine form, этого is masculine). However, the English sentence doesn't have 'this', so probably Duolingo won't accept this variant.

                  January 11, 2016

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BorisMich1

                  "У этой девочки есть брат" - why not?

                  February 10, 2016

                  https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kees-

                  I'm just a beginner, but "этой" means "this." I believe your sentence means something more like: "Does this girl have a brother?" as opposed to "Does the girl have a brother?"

                  February 14, 2016

                  [deactivated user]

                    To make everything more confusing, the 'English for Russian speakers' course translates the definite article with этот/эта/это, as if 'the' and 'this' were the same thing... :x

                    February 14, 2016

                    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dotters

                    That explains a lot of the strange comments I've seen pop up in this course... :-/

                    February 14, 2016

                    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amricht

                    That's what I wrote - without the '. Is this so important?

                    May 5, 2016

                    [deactivated user]

                      Well, est means 'eats' and est' means '[there] is' (literally, 'to the girl there is brother?'). The difference is in the pronunciation of t.

                      May 6, 2016

                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amricht

                      Thank you! That made it clear. :)

                      May 8, 2016

                      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caversham

                      У девушкы was accepted as "almost correct". I thought fem. "a" changed to "ы".

                      May 22, 2016

                      [deactivated user]

                        Some consonants (г, к, х, ч, ш, щ, ж) don't have soft-hard pair. After them we almost always use а, и, у, е, о and almost never use я, ы, ю, э, ё.

                        For ч, ш, щ, ж, the distinction doesn't even exist. For г, к, х it is appearing: it was impossible in the past (before е and и, к/г/х were always soft, otherwise hard), but now more and more words appear which do make this distinction. It is, however, not very widespread yet.

                        The words that use кя/гя/хя, кы/гы/хы, кю/гю/хю, кэ/гэ/хэ, кё/гё/хё are usually foreign loanwords, like Кыргызстан 'Kyrgyztan', Эйяфьядлайёкюдль 'Eyjafjallajökull'; but there's a native verb ткать 'to weave' which has forms like она ткёт 'she weaves', ты ткёшь 'you weave' which also break the above rule (they used to be тчёт and тчёшь in the past, but a dialectal words with кё were borrowed into the literary language).

                        But when declining nouns, you never use кя, кы, кю, кэ, кё. Only ка, ки, ку, ке, ко.

                        May 22, 2016

                        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caversham

                        Many thanks for your detailed explanation. I'm sure I've put девочки in the past, yet for some reason went for девушкы. Glad I queried this!

                        May 22, 2016

                        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YeayYeay

                        Why девочки if it is singular?

                        June 26, 2016

                        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caversham

                        It is singular genitive case. У = possession requires the genitive case.

                        June 26, 2016

                        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YeayYeay

                        thanks

                        July 2, 2016

                        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

                        According to declension tables, the a at the end of девочка should change to ы for genitive case, but the "Russian Spelling Rules" require that а -> и after к, so it is девочки (genitive fem. sing.) rather than девочкы. It took me a while to figure that one out.

                        szeraja_zhaba has a much more thorough layout of this point in this discussion.

                        April 8, 2017

                        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimoneEdwa7

                        It's very confusing how these words end different in different sentences. It's not explaining when to use an A or E or Ы

                        August 1, 2019
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