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  5. "Sie fehlt mir."

"Sie fehlt mir."

Translation:I miss her.

January 13, 2013

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/navethechimp

I think the confusion here is not stemming from a difference between German and English grammar. It is instead that the verb itself has a different meaning. In German it is the subject of the sentence that is in a state of being missed by him, where as in English it is the subject of the sentence that is committing the action of missing her. I hope that is correct and makes sense. Please correct me if not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trenty70

Youre right navethechimp. It can also be thought of meaning "she is missing to me"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erik_3745

My version is: "she is missed by me" I think we have the same idea. Interesting to see how different people's brains work


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FacundoArc

It is just like in french "elle me manque"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherle

Yes, absolutely. Also, "Sie gefällt mir" is like "Elle me plaît".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.o_

And it is the exact same as Spanish's 'gustar'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Garybald

And the italian! "Lei mi manca"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Em484950

also Spanish "hacer falta", to be missed (by someone)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leilani238

This made more sense to me when I saw "to lack" as a translation of "fehlen" (http://dict.leo.org/ende/index_de.html#/search=fehlen&searchLoc=0&resultOrder=basic&multiwordShowSingle=on) -> "She is lacking to me". That, at least to me, seems less ambiguous about the direction of "missing" than "to be missing".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FisherLiz

That seems to me to be how the difference is & where the problem lies. We just have to reverse our thinking. . . thanks for the explanation!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nikosei

just like when I encountered "du gefallst mir", I was deeply disturbed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FisherLiz

I got this one wrong in French too. It's a weird, backwards way of thinking for us English speakers! But it's like "Das gefaellt mir", and "Es tut mir leid", so I'll get it right eventually. . .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erikman

I hate this verb (not really, but it's hard to grasp for an English speaker). I just have to think of it as meaning "to be missing from," and 'from'='von,' which is a dative preposition, so it takes 'mir' instead of 'mich.' The same with gefallen and gehoren ('to be liked by' and 'to belong to'- 'bei' and 'zu' are also dative prepositions so they also take mir or dir etc.).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eNop

I think it's importat to note that, here, is the verb "fehlen" (be missing) that requires Dative, like a Dative preposition would.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OBrais

I don't know how this question can be improved, but if you don't know the verb "fehlen" and you learn it with this sentence, you will be told that "fehlt = to miss". Then you see that the subject is in German is "Sie" and you can only learn by failing! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maxbanana

It can be improved by giving more info in the tip for fehlen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/af056

I got it wrong too. BUT, looking at it, the mir should have been a clue. The sense of it is something like "she is missing TO ME". If she missed me, I'd expect it to be mich rather than mir.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HealThySelf

fair point :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/walty

Can I say "Ich fehle sie"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherle

No, you can't. "Fehlen" has to be used with the dative case. So you could say "Ich fehle ihr", but that would mean the opposite: "She misses me". The structure is like "Sie gefällt mir" (=literally: She appeals to me, i.e. I like her).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dragonfredd

So you could translate this more literally as "She is missed by me." Is that right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

The construction is very like "She fails me", if that helps people remember.

...with luck, only a very few of you will be completely confused by it...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rainbowpuke

She [is missed by] me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WillCWC

Why can't this sentences translates into "She misses me."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tholenst

Because in german "fehlen", the object is the thing which is being missed.

Thus, "Peter fehlt mir" is translated with "I miss Peter". Another example: "Das Fenster fehlt bei diesem Haus." -- "The window is missing on this house".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jloris

Isn't that backwards? The subject -- akkusativ ("sie") -- is the thing being missed and the indirect object -- dativ (mir) -- is the thing doing the missing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoBSakamato

Yea, i thought this was a no-brainer. i was robbed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tagwato

¿ "Sie fehlt mir" = "Ich vermisse sie" ?


[deactivated user]

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ginagillen

    why is I miss you wrong?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherle

    If "Sie" meant "you [formal]", the verb would be different: "Sie fehlen mir".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamMasters

    So, how would you say, She misses me?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

    Probably, "Ich fehle ihr".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMBarrett52

    As a native English-speaker, it is natural to read the sentence in order. Therefore, it reads (to me) that "She misses me." So my question would be, if I want to say that "she misses me," would I reverse the order and say "mir fehlt sie?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cred5

    If I'm not mistaken, this is structured in a similar way to French, where you would say "Elle me manque" (literally "I lack her")


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shubham3756t

    If is Sie there Then it should be They not "I"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jason_in_DC

    what is the difference between fehlen und verpassen?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joejoejumps

    I thought that meant something inappropriate in English haha


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElnaNaude

    You are not the only one. At first I was annoyed, till I realized what the word actually meant and just laughed (half embarrassed) at myself hie hie


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leila.arya

    So how we wrote : she miss me ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaurenceJa20

    I am getting confused with all with words for missing. I get verpassen is to miss something - like lunch ( i remember it as is pass it (accidentally) and then there was vermissen which means you miss something - as in you long for it. But now theyve introduced fehlt. Googling it it seems it means - to be missing. but here it is used in the same way as i thought vermissen would be?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ppmd5514

    Duo is wrong:The best translation is: You(Sie) miss (Fehlt) me(mir)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kejjer

    You polyglots are taxing my sanity

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