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https://www.duolingo.com/tjasonham

Bläckfisk!

tjasonham
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To a Swede this might be splitting hairs but I was just wondering if there is a common way that Swedes (and other N. European cultures?) differentiate between squid, cuttlefish and octopi. Are these all 'bläckfisk' on a menu? Or at a fish market?

As an English speaker they are very different animals to me, but of course, in my parent's native language there were no words for orange, pink, or grey until Spanish colonizers foisted them upon us so everything is relative.

2 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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As far as I know, we use only bläckfisk for the animal. Of course there are different species and a zoologist or cook might be interested in the differences between them, but most people don't know much about them.

There are (normally) no bläckfiskar in the Baltic Sea (although there have been some "leaking" in at times, see http://www.expressen.se/kvallsposten/ovanliga-invasionen-i-oresund---blackfiskar/) , but there seem to be some on the western cost of Sweden: http://www.svd.se/rekordstor-blackfisk-fast-i-kraftbur.

On a restaurant menu and in the frozen food section of a supermarket, they are probably called calamares or calamari, just plainly borrowed from Spanish and Italian. But they are not that commonly eaten.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tjasonham
tjasonham
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Wonderful answer. En lingot för dig~ I always thought that wherever there was a giant expanse of water, there would be some sort of squid or octopus action. :P

It's a good reminder that food vocabulary in most of the world is deliberately tied to very local and seasonal eating

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
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Haha, isn't it great how we learn so many other things on here "accidentally", while aiming to learn languages? It was only when I googled to reply to your question that I learned that these kinds of creatures exist anywhere near here...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tjasonham
tjasonham
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Also I love that the second article calls octopi "åttaarmade bläckfiskar". English speakers categorize octopi and squid based on how many tentacles they have. (In theory, at least. I'd say in practice it's more about what their heads look like, lol)

So then squid would be "tioarmade bläckfiskar" I guess hehe.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skalpadda

This is indeed how we differentiate between them when needed.

Åttaarmad bläckfisk (literally: eight-armed ink fish) means octopus.

Tioarmad bläckfish (ten-armed ink fish) means squid.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FabFrusciante

I don't know if it helps, but in German (if you consider it as a North European Language) exists a distinction between squid/cuttlefish (= Tintenfisch) and octopi (= Krake/ Oktopus). But honestly, most people use the first term Tintenfisch for both, while the second ones I mentioned are limited on octopi.

I looked in my Norwegian dictionary and there also only one word (blekksprut) for all three English words ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W
Joel__W
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Blekksprut just made my day. Ah, silly Norwegians...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FabFrusciante

Å spruta makes it hard not to laugh, that's true :D

2 years ago