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"Lubisz ich?"

Translation:Do you like them?

January 11, 2016

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/esposch

I sometimes wonder if the Polish language is nothing more than an incredibly complex system designed to confuse Germans.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

why would polish people want to confuse Germans when they can't speak (Niemcy)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vengir

Explaining the joke:

An urban legend about the origin of word „Niemcy” (Germany) in Polish is „niemówiący” – "mute people".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

And in Russian, they're also niemcy немцы, Germans. Немые люди, niemyje liudi, are "mute people."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

"niemyje" sounds to me as if they didn't wash themselves :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

ŁÓŁ! That's niemytyje Hahahaha! I love these false friends! I could go all day!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Well technically it only 'sounds', I guess 'not-washing-themselves people' would be "niemyjący się ludzie". But 'he doesn't was himself' is "on się nie myje" ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

nie mojusijesja liudi, не мо́ющиеся люди, not-washing-themselves people hahaha

On nie mojetsja, Он не моется. :-D


[deactivated user]

    Not just an urban legend, it seems! Eastern lavic languages use the same word for Germans.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

    some sources, also provide a second possible etymology, the Nemeti tribe https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nemetes


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TseDanylo

    Cool, in Ukrainian it's Nimetsi (Німеці). I love how similar the two languages are! XD


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr.Xee
    • 1148

    There's no "e" letter in this word in Ukrainian, and it's not capitalized, btw. Just німці (nimtsi).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vytah

    Obligatory Jak rozpętałem drugą wojnę światową: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlOoSsfU6cM


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vengir

    The fragment with „palce – panzer” is also nice to illustrate the point :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yibemajam

    Hahaha, I agree with you esposch. The word "ich" is pronounced the same way in German, but mean two different things in the two languages.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristineKr465965

    Confuse Germans? I'm convinced they wanted NOBODY else to understand them! Let's constantly change the ending of every single word on every single sentence!

    But I'll bet Poles are brilliant at algebra because that's what all these word equations remind me of!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

    Exactly the same thing in Russian means, "Do you love them?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spedi880

    I don't understand why in this sentence is used "ich" instead of "je" isn't it accusative?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

    Read this thread. It's been covered above. ich is if there is one male person in the group. Otherwise it's je.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sprightlyr

    is ich gender neutral? is there a gender neutral way to refer to someone at all in polish/newer polish lingo?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rebeccah593429

    In English you can use "them" to refer to groups of objects as well as people ("Do you like them [those books/the cookies/the paintings/etc]"). Is "ich" the same?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vengir

    In general, "ich" can be only used to refer to groups with at least one male person. If it's a group of objects or females, then you would use "je".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristineKr465965

    The word for "he eats"? That's not going to get confusing! Nope! :/


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

    Well, in English the word "bat" can be used for a type of flying animal and for the thing used in baseball, and I don't think anyone's confused by that. Homonyms exist in any language, that's normal.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

    Now, a question for you: How do you cope with having 90 meanings for the word "set"? :D

    https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/set#English


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CameronSne5

    Whaaaat! I literally just got an answer wrong where I tried to translate "do you like them" as "czy lubisz ich" and got it wrong! And now it offers me the question in the reverse order and tells me it is in fact a good translation?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

    So, in other words, should it be Czy [ty] ich lubisz?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

    I'd go either with "Lubisz ich?" or "Czy ty ich lubisz?".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oceane_007

    How would you say "Do you like theirs?" rather than "Do you like them?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

    In theory this could mean "Do you like theirs?", but I'd consider it very unlikely, if I wanted to say that, I'd rather repeat the noun that is 'theirs'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/va-diim

    In Ukrainian there is їхній/їхня/їхнє/їхні (jichnij/jichnia/jichnie/jichni) that means "theirs," and in Russian non-standard colloquial ихний/ихняя/ихние (ichnij/ichniaja/ichnije) that is used ungrammatically for "theirs," considered incorrect but common in certain dialects. The correct form is only их (ich). Polish has no version of those?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

    Oh, actually we do, ichni/ichnia/ichnie (https://pl.wiktionary.org/wiki/ichni). Wiktionary considers it colloquial and meaning something like 'not ours, but theirs', so contrasting us and them.

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