"Jesz żółty ser."

Translation:You are eating yellow cheese.

January 12, 2016

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ryo87

Zolty ser to po angielaku nie jest po prostu cheese?

January 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vytah

W angielskim słowo cheese odnosi się do wszystkich rodzajów sera, w tym twarogów, serów pleśniowych czy serów typu feta. Nie ma wyrażenia, które określałoby dokładnie to, co polskie "żółty ser".

In Polish, all cheeses that aren't soft and are of yellow-to-orange colour are referred to as żółty ser. It's less of a description of colour and more of a category.

January 14, 2016

[deactivated user]

    Hey, vytah. I disagree with you. There is a way to say "żółty ser" in English, except we don't use colors, instead we concentrate on the texture. In U.S., we call them "hard cheeses" or "semi-hard cheeses" or just "semi-hard and hard cheeses" (these last category is going to include all "żółte sery").

    Then there are two other categories: "soft cheeses" which would be "sery pleśniowe" (e.g. Brie) in Polish, and the final category is "fresh cheeses" which are cheeses that still look and taste somewhat like milk, e.g. "twarogi", or italian cheese "ricotta".

    If you'd like the whole list, then I found this useful website: http://www.realcaliforniamilk.com/cheese-types

    April 12, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jabramsohn

    Same exact difference in Hebrew! Do you also call cheese spreads "white cheese"?

    May 10, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vytah

    No.

    Cheese spread is called ser topiony, literally "molten cheese". Most of sold varieties of cheese spreads are beige or pale yellowish.

    Biały ser is a rarely used synonym for twaróg, quark.

    Some other white-looking cheeses, like fromage, cottage cheese or cream cheese (but not for example feta), are sometimes referred to as twarożek ("the lesser quark"), but never as biały ser.

    May 10, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eyesaresmiles

    You're talking formally. Yes, there are other 'cheeses' but in practice, when British people say cheese, you should understand they mean "żółty ser". If you go into a shop in the UK and ask for cheese you will be given or offered "żółty ser", and the person asking will expect "żółty ser". It is highly unlikely that anyone will offer you feta, cream cheese, or even brie unless you ask for it specifically. Because cheese is yellow. Unless it's red leicester :)

    May 20, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arminia11_web_de

    Just don't eat yellow snow.

    June 11, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrI0sha

    Shouldn't imperative "eat yellow cheese" (without the "you") be also excepted as a valid translation?

    January 4, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

    No, why do you assume it's imperative? It's not.

    January 5, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrI0sha

    How would you order somebody to eat [yellow cheese]?

    January 6, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

    2nd person singular of "jeść" is "Jedz!", 2nd person plural is "Jedzcie!".

    If you soften Z, you arrive at "Jedź!" and "Jedźcie", which are imparative forms of "to go (by vehicle)".

    January 6, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrI0sha

    Got it, thanks. As I can now see, I was confused, as in Russian the imperative (Ешь!) would coincide with the descriptive (Ты ешь). I had assumed it would be the same in Polish :)

    January 6, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

    Oh, that's why. Well, I don't think that in Polish any two verb forms may be identical, which sometimes happens in other languages.

    January 6, 2018
    Learn Polish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.