"I go to school."

Translation:Chodzę do szkoły.

January 12, 2016

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jgasteiz

Wouldn't "idę do szkoły" be correct here?

January 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/kmkornob

I thought the same thing, but because the action is habitual (i.e., I go to school on a regular basis), it's chodzę instead. Idę means "I am going to school right now"

January 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mihxal

"Idę do szkoły" would mean "I am going to school".

January 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/malcolm7777777

I think chodzę means walk and idę means go

August 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/immery

no. We have it much more complicated. both chodzę and idę can mean walk and go depending on sentence. And go can also be translated to other verbs depending on means of transportation.

The way duolingo makes you learn is - idę is a right now action with direction- we make you translate" I am going/ I am walking somewhere" to "idę"

chodzić - is habitual, having ability to walk, or walking aimlessly - we make you translate" I walk/ I go" to "chodzę"

August 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Michalisdg

In a nutshell: "chodzić" is the imperfective verb while "idę" is the perfective form (I am not sure whether it has an infinitive).

September 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
Mod
  • 3

Yeah... I'm afraid that's almost entirely wrong :

Both these verbs are imperfective, and of course both have infinitives ('iść' from 'idę'). The difference is not between imperfective and perfective. The difference is between something that happens habitually (chodzę - I go to school every day) and 'right now' (idę - I am going to school at this very moment), and also for Present Continuous in the future meaning (idę - I am going to school tomorrow).

The problem is that due to some idiomatic (?) constructions, the school context messes with the iść/chodzić distinction. It's better to discuss those verbs on the examples of cinema, theater, shop... just anything other than school.

September 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Michalisdg

I see. Thank you for the clarification.

September 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/malcolm7777777

Not super sure duo likes to translate both as go and mąkę me ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤ based on context the slimy bags

August 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Philipo.

aarrgghh…. this section seems to be full of contradictions..I might have more luck flicking a coin between 'idzie' and 'chodzie', sometimes...oh well we keep on trucking (utrzymujemy się!).the differences are so slight and almost subject to interpretation...I don't remember these differences as a kid with my Polish family..

September 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
Mod
  • 3

Well, there is a big difference between "Chodzę do szkoły" (I am a pupil) and "Idę do szkoły" (I'm on my way/I'm going to school tomorrow).

September 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rafalopopolsku

As we don’t know the context both answers should be correct : "Idę do szkoły" and "Chodzę do szkoły"

March 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/alik1989

This has been answered already. Idę do szkoły means I'm going to school.

March 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Rafalopopolsku

I said : depending on the context both answers are correct : you can say : "Jutro idę do szkoły", which means : tomorrow I go to school. Right or not ?

March 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/alik1989

Jutro idę do szkoły is either I'm going to school tomorrow or I will go to school tomorrow. Using present simple for a planned future event is... a very uncommon choice.

March 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Rafalopopolsku

Are you a native polish speaker ? Because I know from a native Polish speaker that I can say "Jutro idę do szkoły", so it does not seem that ... uncommon. By the way you can do the same in french, and it's not shocking at all, you can say : "demain j'irai à l'école" or "demain je vais à l'école" so future or present for the verb, it's totally ok, that's why I'm not surprised it's also ok for Polish language.

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/alik1989

When I say "present simple" I always refer to the English tense.

The are only two situations in which you can use present simple for future events:

  • 1) statements of general truth (like: tomorrow is Monday)
  • 2) regular events scheduled by a timetable (like departures or arrivals of flights and trains)

It's very unlikely that a native English speaker will use present simple in this sentence.

March 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Ulrike164127

Vu dans le dictionnaire polonais : isc do szkoly!!

March 29, 2019
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