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"Masz rodzinę?"

Translation:Do you have a family?

January 13, 2016

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mixkes

Kind of sad question, isnt it :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AstroVulpes

Well, most people do... Most people have parents...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lunaexoriens

It is probably a joke, but... Anyway, "rodzina" in this question refers to your own family (a wife, children etc.).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AstroVulpes

Oh, okay, is there a specific term for family (your parents, grandparents, etc.)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

No rodzina means family and includes your grandfather's half-sister's great-granddaughter's husband.

But in some context it means parents with children/your spouse and children. But if you ask me that question I'll politely reply that yes, my parents are healthy and I'm currently flatmates with my cousin's daughter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zagadka314

Just like in English, I guess. My family, based on context, might mean the people in my home (and closest relatives, if we don't live together), while it can also mean everyone you are related to.

Though I have always wondered, since we all share a common ancestor, where does family end and humanity begin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bvdstel1

At these times I am pretty happy that my native language has seperate words for this. It must be kind of confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doesntwrite

Is there a separate word in Polish for extended family and for near family?

I don't know how to explain it properly in English, but in my language we have "porodica" (you and your parents & grandparents/you and your spouse and kids) and "familija/rodbina" (other family, like aunts, uncles, cousins, great-grandparents, non-direct grandparents, etc.).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Well, we can just say "bliższa rodzina" and "dalsza rodzina" ('closer' and 'further').


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/margotgm

I English it would be correct to translate this as "have you a family'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yobama42069

*Sad Harry Potter noise


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helena834099

Do you have a family,- spouce & kids Do you have family- further relations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaraWie

Hey! I have a question. Some verbs (like potrzeba) go with the genitive (like 'traditionally' or because they imply a vague 'possession'). Why isn't this the case with myć? I understand that myc goes with accusative? (and the negation probably with genitive?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

I have no idea why you ask it here, but myć=wash goes with accusative. Mieć = have also goes with accusative, and all verbs that go with accusative go with genitive when negated.

But I do not know where you had this imply vague possesion = genitive?

When the question is whose? and English people add 's at the end - Poles use genitive

Kasia's cat= kot Kasi

but if any "imply vague" verbs go with genitive - they are negative verbs, they imply need

I found a list of verbs, with genitive (according to this webpage http://portalwiedzy.onet.pl/140223,,,,dopelniacz,haslo.html)

  • negative verbs nienawidzić - hate; odmawiać- refuse; negować, brakować-lack

  • other verbs : bać się-be afraid of/fear, brakować/ braknąć lack, chcieć want, dokonywać/ dokonać manage, domagać siędemand, dotyczyć apply, concern, dotykać/ dotknąćtouch, doznawać/ doznaćfeel, lękać siębe afraid/fear, obawiać siębe afraid, fear, oczekiwaćwait, odmawiać/ odmówićrefuse, pilnować guard, look after, potrzebować need, pragnąćwant, próbować/ spróbowaćtry, słuchaćlisten, spodziewać się expect, szukać/ poszukaćsearch, look for, uczyć się/ nauczyć się learn, udzielać/ udzielić ??, unikać/ uniknąć avoid, używać/ użyć use, wymagać demand, wstydzić się be ashamed , wystarczać/ wystarczyć be enough, zabraniać/ zabronić forbid, zakazywać/ zakazać forbid, zapominać/ zapomnieć forget, zazdrościć be jealous, żałować regret, życzyć wish.

  • D występuje też z czasownikami z przedrostkami do- (w zn.: dodać coś do czegoś) oraz na- (w zn. osiągnąć cel), prefixes do- meaning add and -na meaning accomplish, reach target
    np.: doczekać się, dokupić, dolać, dosypać, naczytać się, nagadać, naopowiadać, naznosić

someone made more coherent list here https://www.duolingo.com/comment/12459057


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArtBurnap

Great list and links. I foresee some hard work ahead.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaraWie

Thanks! I mixed up myć and mieć (I meant the last one ;))

So the genitive indicates possession (this was clear to me), so I thought with the verb 'mieć' (to have), the object with that verb actually is being possessed (in this case: a family). I was wondering why it isn't in accusative. Now i see that the appropriate question is 'whose' family... (And this object is absent in this sentence, so no genitive... :))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/e28144

How does "you've family" make sense? It doesnt seem right to say that in english. We might say "you've got a family?" But not "you've family" ???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/margotgm

as a question it makes perfect sense in English to ask 'have you a family?' but not as you put it 'you've family'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/e28144

Yea but the translation here says "you've family" which doesnt make sense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/e28144

Scratch that - it seems to have updated


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zagadka314

It sounds like "Masz rodzina?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/praytherosary

None. No... there was one man who said he was my father...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Centorior

Nie, kobiety mnie nie lubią.

Did I say that right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Tak :)

(that smile is because of the sentence being correct, not because of its contents)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Centorior

Dziękuję bardzo! That's the first Polish sentence I managed to make (correctly) without looking at any hints! Yay!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bvdstel1

Is it just me or does the emphasis go on the second syllable with rodzinę? Where rodzina has emphasis on the first syllable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aldrost

By emphasize you probably mean word stress. In Polish words the stress goes to the last syllable but one. So rodzina has the stress on the i.

I suppose you mixed it with the word родина in Russian where the stress is on the o.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlanGair

As family can be one or many, it is very common in English to say 'Do you have any family?' Not accepted here though.

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