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  5. "У нас нет его имени."

"У нас нет его имени."

Translation:We do not have his name.

January 14, 2016

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malchikrene

what does this sentence mean??


[deactivated user]

    Maybe it's a sentence about some kind of list, or some kind of database. I believe "We do not have his name in the database" makes sense. At least «У нас в ба́зе да́нных нет е́го и́мени» definitely makes sense in Russian.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chiffewar

    Can it mean "we don't kniw his name" -- like, "Автор книги жил в Москве. У нас нет его имени"?


    [deactivated user]

      No, it sounds unnatural. In your context, «Мы не знаем его имени» sounds much better. (Alternatively, «Его имя до нас не дошло» works too.)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Futurulus

      what about "we don't have the same name as him"--"нашего папы зовут Борис, а у нас нет его имени"?


      [deactivated user]

        No, this is not something we'd say in Russian.

        I'd say «На́шего па́пу зову́т Бори́с, а нас зову́т по-друго́му».


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dbassi

        It sounds Soviet government-like haha.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/geneven

        Well in the United States we have "He did not leave his name," which sounds just as strange if you really think of it.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahawkins17

        But "leaving a name" came from people leaving calling cards and later business cards. So now we have a shortened expression meaning that their name is unknown. Strange saying without the social context, I guess. Here, unless we are making a list and don't have this person's name on it, this sentence is extremely awkward.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SPlingogo

        A valid context would be making a list of people for a meeting .... the Director of Marketing for XYZ Corp., "We do not have his name."


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deadh34d

        Why имени instead of зовут? Would they be interchangeable in this context?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

        I think зовут is a verv, whereas имени is a noun. Thus I suppose that you can't just substitute one word for the other, but maybe you could rephrase the question.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

        Sorry, typo. A "verb" of course, not a "verv".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlenaNatascha

        Меня зовут... does not literally mean 'My name is...' but rather 'I'm called ... (by them)'. (Они) зовут is the conjugation of the verb звать = call. Имени is the (irregular) gentitive and dative singular of имя = name.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

        "и́мя • (ímja) n inan (genitive и́мени, nominative plural имена́, genitive plural имён)

        name, first name, Christian name, given name (for inanimate things, see назва́ние (nazvánije))" https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/имя#Russian


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ste.ven0307

        What is the difference between зовут and имени?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatansPetDuck

        I'm not a native to Russian but I am to another Slavic language. I believe зовут is a verb meaning to call. Как тебя зовут = how do they call you (in literal translation), and имени is a form of the noun имя or name. Please someone correct me if I'm wrong.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/origamifish

        How would you compare two nouns witg similes in russian???


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GranvilleS6

        Who was that masked man? У нас неь его имени (the lone ranger, hi ho silver away!) Giving my age away there:-)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shivaadh

        "There are also a group of several irregular "different-declension nouns" (Russian: разносклоня́емые существи́тельные), consisting of a few neuter nouns ending in -мя (e.g. вре́мя "time") and one masculine noun путь "way". However, these nouns and their forms have sufficient similarity with feminine third declension nouns that some scholars such as Litnevskaya[7] consider them to be non-feminine forms of this declension" https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_declension

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