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https://www.duolingo.com/Cinzia47

vocabulary list with pronunciation for Irish, please?

Cinzia47
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I am really enjoying the Irish course and have just reached level 12 so I feel quite pleased with myself!!! However, if we were ever tested on speaking into the microphone I'd be absolutely useless.
Perhaps some time in the future Duo could compile a list of some, if not all, the vocabulary and provide a pronunciation guide which we could refer to when in doubt? Please?

2 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

Aside from the problems of providing a written guide for pronunciation (only a tiny fraction of Duolingo's users can read IPA) it is also the case that there is no single standard pronunciation in Irish. While the Caighdeán Oifigiúil provides a standard for the grammar and spelling of Irish, you can see the variation in accepted pronunciation demonstrated on the Pronunciation Database at teanglann.ie.

It's unlikely, for both technical and political reasons, that Duolingo will get much more descriptive about pronunciation than it already is (by providing spoken versions of some sentences).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barbie_Snow

I understand this might be tricky. However, I am following the Spanish program, and they simply say from the start that they are going to use Spanish from South America, so really this could be done. I have started the Irish, but I have no motivation because of the lack of pronounced words. This is not latin, the language is not dead and I don't see the point in learning if I cannot read it outloud. I find it very sad.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

It would actually be a much easier issue to deal with if the language was actually dead. It's precisely because it's not quite dead that you have the political problem of defining a "standard" pronunciation - you'd be accused of finishing off the last dregs of "native" Irish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cinzia47
Cinzia47
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English has a huge number of dialects. The obvious ones like Cockney, Geordie, Liverpudlian (aka Scouse), but also lesser known ones like Wearside, Berkshire, etc. I don't understand why that should be a problem. Have you ever listened to Glaswegian English??? Italian has dialects, such as Abbruzzese but it doesn't seem to bother any of the Duo students. I still wish that some pronunciation list was available.

Anyway thanks for your reply.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

As I said, it's a political problem, not a technical problem. The issue of "standard English" was decided a long time ago, and Glaswegians and Cockneys don't object when learners are taught "standard English". In Irish, though, aside from the comments about the audio (even when the speaker isn't making any errors, there are often complaints, because a great deal of her pronunciations are within the Munster range) you can read comments even here on Duolingo blaming the Caighdeán for the continuing decline of Irish in the Gaeltacht areas, as well as complaints from learners who are familiar with particular aspects of a dialect that Duolingo won't accept their dialect versions of answers. The Caighdeán itself has been modified to accept both ar an mbord and ar an bhord (Lenition or Eclipses after certain prepositions and the definite article) and Duolingo won't correct you if you enter either form (most of the time) which weakens it as a teaching tool. The Caighdeán did not adopt a standard Lárchanúint (Central dialect), even though the academic work of developing one was done.

You're right that Duolingo would be a slightly better tool for unattached beginners in the language if it picked a specific dialect and stuck to it, but it might make itself slightly less acceptable to other classes of learners.

2 years ago