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  5. "Mis amigos dejaron de beber."

"Mis amigos dejaron de beber."

Translation:My friends stopped drinking.

January 14, 2013

71 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmcgwn

My dictionary says that 'dejar de beber' means to 'be on the wagon, give up drinking' so the context suggests eliminating alcohol. The lesson I learned here is check the meaning of a verb + de as it often can be an idiom/expression.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pleiadian_

What dictionary is that explanation from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joe814027

I WILL MAKE IT EASIER, DEJAR DE INFINITIVE= TO QUIT OR STOP DOING SOMETHING. EXAMPLE, DEJA DE CORRER= STOP RUNNING.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shafica

Thanks RM, I was wondering that same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ForestMoods

Thats what it sounded like!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jasonisme84

Why not "My friends stopped to drink"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kcmurphy

"In order to drink" (what you suggest) would be "para beber." Dejar probably wouldn't be used in that context, either


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lrtward

I don't know why this got down voted. It is 100% correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeanG6

I don't get it either. Some people down-vote good comments all the time. It doesn't make sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OneVerce

isn't "drinking" past tense, we're talking about infinitives in this skill so I assumed beber would be "to drink". How would I know it's drinking?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel-in-BC

The Spanish is consistent: use the infinitive. It's the English that's inconsistent: we sometimes translate it as the infinitive and sometimes as the -ing form. (We -- native English speakers -- know this naturally; English learners must memorize and it's very difficult because there really is no pattern or logic.)

To quote from the link below: To use one of the verbs from the previous list in a Spanish sentence, the first verb is conjugated, and the verb after the preposition is in the infinitive form regardless of how the English equivalent is stated. In English, the second verb will often be in its infinitive form, just like Spanish. However, sometimes in English, the second verb is in its gerund form: “–ing.”

http://www.cliffsnotes.com/foreign-languages/spanish/spanish-i/prepositions/preposition-use-with-verbs

btw, in English, "drinking" can be past, present, or future, depending on what surrounds it. Also, it can be a gerund (verb form used as a noun).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/THeNeeno

Dejar de is to quit doing something. Stopped to do it is almost the opposite, isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjekstrom

Isn't there a difference in meaning between "My friends stopped drinking" and "my friends stopped to drink". The first sentence would imply that your friends were drinking and now stopped it, the second sentence means that your friends stopped doing whatever they were doing to drink something.

The original Spanish sentence carries the meaning that they were drinking and stopped it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aljoja

Dejar de means to stop or quit something. Dejar de fumar means to quit smoking. So my guess is they are on the wagon. I believe if you stop to drink, it would be para beber, here para meaning "for the purpose of".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/electrician

For a Finnish speaking old man it is impossible to know when the verb "dejar de" should be translated in English as "stop", "finish" or "end"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wazzie

Finish or end are basically synonymous (the same) and mean to complete something all the way.
John finished the race. (John ran the entire race)
The parade ended. (the parade completed its route)
I finished cleaning. (the house is now clean)
Stop is used when a task is quit midway, and is not completed.
John stopped running the race. (John could not complete the race)
The parade stopped (sometime went wrong, and the parade is stationary and not moving)
I stopped cleaning (my house isn't clean, but I am no longer cleaning it).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lrtward

That is a good insight. Furthermore, I think (but could be mistaken) that finish is to complete a task, and ended is the termination of an event.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagicTrumpetMan

This is a really good comment. Thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seanb276

I don't get this one. When i hover over dejaron is states 'let, allow'. So where does stopped come from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caiser

dejar= to allow

dejar de= to stop


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spade

is this an all the time thing in spanish, or is it an exception? when de comes before a word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lrtward

It is not when de comes before a word, but it is the difference between "dejar" (to allow) and "dejar de" (to stop). The additional word makes the meaning of the verb different. This happens in English, too. For example, you can throw some peas, or you can throw up some peas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daveduck

Though this isn't a dramatic difference. Both are cases of throwing. "Allow" vs. "stop" is pretty huge.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lrtward

I don't know. I'd much rather throw a baseball with some friends than puke my guts out. They seem pretty different to me :) But yeah, I see your point. Both are an act of ejecting something away from yourself.

I think of "dejar" as opening my hands, raising them in kind of an "I surrender" fashion, and stepping back a pace or two. You're letting something happen, getting un-involved. In addition to "allow" or "permit", dejar also means "to leave" as in "dejé los papeles en la mesa" (I left the papers on the table). Again, open hands, raised, stepping back. You're getting un-involved with the papers.

I think of "dejar de" in the same way, but this time I'm backing away from the beverage. I'm "letting it alone", or quitting it. Becoming un-involved with it.

Dejar de doesn't mean to stop as in to put on the brakes or make someone else cease doing something. It means to refrain from doing it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daveduck

Irtward, gracias.

The getting uninvolved notion is handy. (As for beverages, I'm determined to stay seriously dejar de with large quantities of tequila...)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeanG6

dejar = leave, quit; forsake, abandon; lend; forget; drop; put down; yield, produce; give up; stop


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/homefire

Interesting idiom! Thanks for the example. That makes me feel better, because I was feeling pretty cheated that allow drinking wasn't accepted!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/homefire

I really like the comment above about "let" being in the sense of releasing, becoming uninvolved open hands. It's really more a sense of leaving than "let" in the sense I usually use it. Very excellent, and I actually wonder if "let" should be removed from the drop-down definitions! Seems like other than "Let it go" there wouldn't be a lot of places you would actually use dejar in place of let.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lrtward

I can't reply directly to you, but dejar meaning "to let" is pretty useful. Déjame pensar en un ejemplo....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shafica

dejar has several meanings depending on the context. See: http://spanish.about.com/od/usingparticularverbs/a/dejar.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisOverc

it helps me to translate it as "they let up on drinking"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michisjourdi

I also missed this in the translation hints.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatricioJiang

Another way to think about this: "My friends let (go) of drink(ing)".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jhe

In Chinese, all tenses are implicit so no verb is ever changed. What a luxury!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rebotica

Yeh, but the beer is rubbish!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jhe

Maybe but the sorghum and rice fermentations are quite good...and effective. Cheers!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Greenweech

My friends left to go drinking was marked wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kcmurphy

That's because it is wrong. That would be "mis amigos se fueron para beber."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmcgwn

I am thinking it may be "mis amigos se fueron ir beber" as well. 'to go drinking'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Azahli

Does this have the implication that the friends have stopped drinking alcohol? Or is it just drinking in general?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kenny890352

How dull of them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duolearner12345

What about "My friends left to drink?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kcmurphy

That would be "mis amigos se fueron para beber." "To" in the English sentence means "in order to."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bluezone

That was also my answer "My friends left to drink". To quit means "quitar" but I think in Spanish "to quit drinking" is "dejar de beber". I guess this is one of those things we just have to learn just because.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kcmurphy

"Quitar" does not mean "to quit"; it means "to take off; remove."

"Dejar de" means "to quit"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bluezone

Thanks for the 'quitar' correction. Now the "dejar de" being "to quit". In another lesson I answered "They have to quit drinking" for "Tienen que dejar de beber" but it was wrong. Correct translation was "They have to stop drinking." Thanks again, though :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anglobrasileiro

Why is My friends have stopped drinking not accepted ? I cannot see the difference whether it was at the end of a party or forever.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aljoja

That is using a different past tense called the present perfect, with the helping verb Haber. I think that would be "mis amigos han dejado de beber".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bisade

why is it not just bebiendo..?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel-in-BC

In Spanish, we consistently use the infinitive in these situations; it's the English that can go with either the infinitive or the -ing form. -iendo or -ando is kind of equivalent to -ing in English, but that doesn't mean it's always used in the same way, so be careful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Benjamin17

If it means my friends have literally stopped the action of drinking, would "bastante" be used? Dejar means that they quit or stopped drinking as in a life choice right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rebotica

What is wrong with "ceased" drinking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yimantuwingyai

So, when do you use "dejar" in the definition of "finish"? Because I said "My friends finished drinking" and it wasn't accepted. So what context is it used for "finish" if at all?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Val390

Correct option given was 'My friends quit drinking' but I put 'my friends give up drinking' and it was marked wrong. Have reported it..can anyone see why it shouldn't be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Platachica

Any native english speakers ever hear the atypical expression "left off" meaning stopped? As in "they left off drinking", that was my thought.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bassheadxx

I keep thinking "parar"(-to stop) would be used, but it is usually 'dejar de' that is used. Is there a rule on when to use each word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kgraham005

I don't drink anymore. I don't drink any less either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gstergar

Why would they stop?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/norma0044

I think Duo could explain instead of just marking it wrong, as essentially it means the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmedMetwa547013

Dejaron beber sounds right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulDavies632482

I thought dejar was to leave?? My friends left to drink.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Savethegaywhales

And why not "my friends have stopped drinking"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnConnor10

"Dejar de " usually means to stop or to give up:

Examples: Hoy dejo de fumar. (Today I give up smoking.)

La hepatitis A dejó de ser una cosa de niños. (Hepatitis A stopped being a children's disease.)

Nunca dejaré de amarte. (I'll never stop loving you.)

Pasted from: http://spanish.about.com/od/usingparticularverbs/a/dejar.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clara_Elizabeth

So is it something like "my friends left off drinking"? Because otherwise it's hard to see the connction between leaving something somewhere, allowing something, and stopping something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wazzie

I like to think of it as "took leave of".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sharon_Kay

And we learned dejaron when? And that was my third heart already. I hate learning a new word by losing a heart. It's going to be a long night . . . .

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