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  5. "Sei duro come un mulo."

"Sei duro come un mulo."

Translation:You are stubborn as a mule.

December 18, 2013

146 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/italikaren

Does anyone else agree that it should be "you are AS stubborn as a mule" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tintin1001

Yes it says that is the answer but there was not another 'as"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamMansbr

I say it like that, and it accepted it today (2014-04-07)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AddyMoreno

It didn't accept it today 8/17/17


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

Accepted 02-11-17 (that's 02-Nov-17)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ciaran_Conneely

Not accepted on 9th December 2017


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sigira0

stubborn as a mule accepted feb 23rd 18...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mehefin14

Anfonais ingot atoch oherwydd gwelais yr ydach wedi bod yn dysgu Cymraeg fy mamiaith, da iawn chi! Ciao.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/efeakca

It is wrong as a English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caz-WS

Yes. It's a comparative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DesmaGwen

yes I said the same thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardMil16

Agree. It's how I always heard it expressed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lindabelli4

That's how I always heard the expression here in Boston!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferRa504023

Yes. If you want to sound English when you say it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KT84222

Yes, tell duolingo it is wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlisonRuan1

Yes, it's a comparative! In British English you must say 'as...as' otherwise it's just poor grammar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skate14702

Yes but it did not expect it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AllanBickl

Yes, that's English rather than American


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tintin1001

I am English num nut


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daegy

Guys, remember your Archer. Idioms are just colloquial metaphors. They're expressions used to describe an attribute. Some may not make any sense when translated into a different language. Not necessarily because of the words themselves, but because of the cultural meaning behind them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlisonRuan1

People aren't contesting the Italian but the English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Engi46

The Italian is grammatically correct but the idiom isn't exactly like that. While the English is grammatically incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PliLopes

I think we all need a real italian speaker here ! #justSaying...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Engi46

I am! We usually say "Sei testardo come un mulo"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilmolleggi

if you have any doubts feel free to ask


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PliLopes

Thanks! I'm gonna add u, k?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HopperKremer

Why was all this downvoted so hard?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarbaraHei9

This sounds so very mysterious - are you talking about sth dirty?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tintin1001

Im 1/4 Italian and learning at level 12


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilmolleggi

this is kinda weird. Duro means hard (in both english meanings of not soft and, less often, difficult) but is hardly used for people. There is an idiom about people with duro, that's "essere duro di comprendonio", which means "to be very slow at understanding things" and it is sometimes used omitting the last part e.g. "ma sei davvero duro! Lo vuoi capire che in inglese ci sono due traduzioni per l'italiano tempo? Time e weather! Non sono mica la stessa cosa." But duro as stubborn is weird. This should be "testardo come un mulo" (which is btw an idiom you can hear quite often)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elin.7-1

Well, just because in English we think of mules being stubborn, there's no reason that Italians should. It seems likely to me that duro is used in the same sense here as it is in the hard of understanding phrase you quoted. So mules are stupid in Italian and stubborn in English. That's how idioms work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorendani

They're stubborn in both languages. Actually, I have heard this phrase both with duro and testardo, even if testardo sounds less strange to me. Italian here, ask what you'd like to know ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deRemco

How can I ever know that duro means stubborn, when it does not show up when I hover over it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mtantillo

These are all idioms, so think about similar phrases in English over direct translations of the Italian. If you don't get it on round one, you'll know it for the next go.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINBUR0100

But a more directly related response in English would have been "You're strong as an ox" if we're using that method. "Strong" and "Hard" do not imply "stubborn" to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mtantillo

I've heard "Stubborn as a mule" in English, and it has a different, more emotionally obnoxious, connotation than "Strong as an ox", which implies great physical ability.

I also do see the relation between "strong" and "stubborn". If someone holds strongly to their position, then they are stubborn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patty13647

It is still "as strong as an ox", or "as stubborn as a mule." They DO NOT mean the same things. You may see a connection, but they are not the same. Someone too weak to lift a spoon to his or her mouth can still be as stubborn as a mule. Someone who is agreeable to any kind of change can be as strong as an ox. They aren't interchangeable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CourtneyRynberg

Completely different meanings. "Stubborn as a mule" literally means someone is stubborn, whereas "strong as an ox" relates to their strength.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trilmobile

Stubborn people are often calked "hardheaded" in English. Maybe think of it that way?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarcStarva

Yes. Stuff doesn't get through to them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BiancaCatanzaro

"hardheaded" in italian would be more like "testa dura"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilmolleggi

Thing is it doesn't (see my other comment). It should be testardo (=stubborn) come un mulo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Engi46

Duro, in fact, doesn't mean stubborn. The most correct is testardo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Woomber

It's like the spanish "terco como mula"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vanelopezb

"Terco como una mula" en español.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/a-Lu

ándale, exactamente!


[deactivated user]

    And in Czech "tvrdohlavý jako mezek"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Calbr

    We have a similar expression in portuguese: "teimoso como uma mula"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keenton

    At Poland we say 'uparty jak osioł' which means 'as stubborn as donkey' ^^ is it also correct in english?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Name414945

    Same in german. "Stur wie ein Esel" As stubborn as a donkey. (Similar to pigheaded) And "Stark wie ein Ochse" As strong as an ox. (physically strong)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeilHutchi2

    So, can a donkey be pigheaded? :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/apolapucia

    in russian it says "stubborn as a donkey (or sheep)"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christie-na

    As a donkey in Greek too!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidanthony30

    I understand this is idiomatic. But in English you would have to say "as something as something else". You need the "as" repeated to make it work. So "as stubborn as a mule"because the whole point is to compare one thing with another. My tablet version of the app only gave me one "as" tile. So I have to use a clumsy phrase you wouldnever use in English to get the points!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_Lauren

    I encountered the same issue on my tablet app and had the same thought at first. However, I think the first 'as' is regionally dropped and not absolutely necessary, at least in US English. I've heard the phrase used both with and without that first 'as.' Also, if you consider 'as' synonymous with 'like,' and "You are stubborn like a mule" makes sense, then "You are stubborn as a mule" is reasonable.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KT84222

    In English English similes are formed using 'as ... as a ....' or 'like a ...' You can't use one 'as'. Maybe in American English you can.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sapolion

    Does duro also mean stubborn, or is this just matching the closest idiom in Italian to the one in English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berto29441

    No: it's simply a bad translation


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Engi46

    The Italian for stubborn is "testardo". In fact, the sentence is usually "essere testardo come un mulo"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dtb89

    This is also an English idiom, sometimes said "stubborn as an ass."

    It is, after all, the ass from whom the mule gets his stubbornness (horses are very trainable by comparison).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tigerlily0909

    Or a bull! As in being 'bullheaded'. It seemed like my mother accused me of being "stubborn as a bull" every day of my childhood! lol!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JennaHO

    I have heard ass, mule and ox.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duolessio

    The literal translation of stubborn is testardo, which is often used in place of "duro" in this same idiom.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lobsterdad

    Stubborn as "a" ass? Not "an" ass?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/poschiavo

    It is surely "an ass" not "a ass"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/klesus

    "a ass" is the "correct" reply by duolingo, hence the question.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philoponos

    You're as stubborn as an ass should be an alternative- the present 'You're as stubborn as a ass' makes no sense.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JBunique

    'Duro' in spanish means 'hard', 'tough', ' 'stubborn' ect.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the_beat

    actually 'duro' does not mean 'stubborn' in spanish. at least not in latin america. but 'stubborn as a mule' we do use it literally like that: 'terco como una mula'


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Normano

    Because a mule is a cross between a male donkey and a female horse.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DappleHorse1839

    Yep! You know some horse stuff then,eh?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YichenHu

    This is eeally amazing. We chinese also use ox as a metaphor for stubboness. How come! It's not like this two culture has much connection.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichCooley

    Chinese oxen and Italian oxen act the same...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LucianoPan3

    In Portuguese: "teimoso como uma mula" = "stubborn as a mule" or "cabeça dura" = "hardheaded"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OperaRuss

    In the opera Gianni Schicchi, there is a phrase "Ora siamo alla mula, ..." which is definitely about a mule. Is "il mulo" a donkey and "la mula" a mule? or has something bigger changed in Italian since the early 1900s...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Engi46

    "Sei testardo come un mulo" would be more correct, but it's the same


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Griasschmoan

    An "as" is missing.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoeM.

    Duo now accepts 'tough' as a valid translation for 'duro' in this example.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephmitch

    I've also heard and used "stubborn as an ox" many times


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Normano

    Why is 'obstinate as a mule' wrong?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheBareBears

    The word for "obstinate" in Italian is different than the word for "stubborn". I believe "ostinato" is the Italian word for "obstinate". Hope this helps! :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davetastico

    Ostinato also means stubborn in italian :P that might need to be added!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewWyn

    I went for "as tough as an ox" which is an English idiom but got told i should have gone for "as tough as a wall", which doesn't figure in English at all


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINBUR0100

    I think maybe you're thinking of "tough as an ox" in the sense of "strong as an ox". Which is a different idiom in Italian I guess? Although I haven't run into it yet. (I also guessed strong as an ox for this one...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A.J.Stephen

    En français aussi on dit «têtu comme un mule»


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/klebertpetra

    Why can I not say: you are stubborn like a donkey?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Azechka

    In Russia we say it


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tuttobene04

    got the exact same idiom in turkish.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phildbrown

    There should be two 'as' words or we can't t get it right.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikDiGiglio

    You are as stubborn as an ass. (not as a ass)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EMcDuffie1

    in the word selection that was only one 'as'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pisan_de_Paris

    "as hard as a ass" (sic) is not good English!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berto29441

    In this case we say testardo, not duro. Which Italian "expert" does DL have?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wolfgirl1242

    Aw, Duo was talking about me. :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awolfel

    Uhhhh no not me!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bea410919

    did anyone else think it was 'hung like a horse' lmao?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/domlecon

    The correct answer Duo gave me was "You're hard as a ass." I don't know where to begin...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gyromatical

    How would we know this is not an insult in another language? I'll take these idioms with a grain of salt


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Becca702635

    Shouldn't it be:

    You are as stubborn as a mule

    Or

    You are a stubborn mule


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeilHutchi2

    Allow me to add a quote from Wikipedia: "A male donkey or ass is called a jack, a female a jenny or jennet; a young donkey is a foal. Jack donkeys are often used to mate with female horses to produce mules; the biological "reciprocal" of a mule, from a stallion and jenny as its parents instead, is called a hinny." Ass and mule are not synonymous.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/loufunnell

    There is no second as to pass this


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NolaSmith2

    I agree with ' you are as stubborn as a mule'


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeorgiaRom

    Agree it should be, "You are as stubborn as a mule."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A.J.26

    In Chile would be: "Ay,¡qué soi porfiaao! LOL, but in portuguese "teimoso que nem uma mula" "cabeça dura" are fair common


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malakbydesign

    You are as stuborn as a mule


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amy991718

    This is grammatically incorrect


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeartoftheSea

    How do you get past?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/billiam30

    I thought Duro was strong


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MandolinFace

    The English equivalent ends, "...AS a mule.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XianLayva

    English should have to "as." We more commonly say, "You are as stubborn as a mule."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lindabelli4

    The English idiom is " You are AS stubborn AS a mule."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rosemary264447

    Incorrect English again. This is a comparative so you need an "as" to start the comparison.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeLyons85

    Yes. I have sent it in as an error.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IrinaNova

    I'd rather say "You are camellish!" or "You are mulish!" - why not? I've found this variation: "Senti.Credo che tu mi abbia confuso con un altro mulo parlante!" :))))


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/estoycansad0

    No es posible.

    All over the word at any time there has been only one speaking mule (Francis the Talking Mule, in Italy known as Francis il mulo parlante)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartnRoque

    This is the BEST way to learn italian, you know? Proverbiando s'impara


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hudnut217

    I put "You are hard like a mule" and DL accepted it - that's just wrong.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maddogjonx

    Hard like an ass! not hard like A ass! ridiculous !


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tigerlily0909

    I see some people have commented as saying this "Stubborn as an ass / a donkey" in their day-to-day lives, but I've always said "Stubborn as a bull!" In fact I had that yelled at me for most of my childhood. ;) You know like being "bullheaded". I'm surprised no one else has said this!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ricardonoexiste

    Este tipo es mas 'terco que una mula' (in spanish) :v


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Barbara9206

    In spanish we say "Terco como una mula"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pjaggers

    Stubborn as a wall? Not an ass surely?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Darwin790441

    For Spanish speaking people...I know there's gotta be a few of you that chuckled a little at this phrase if you were vaguely listening at the recording. Cause, I wasn't looking at the screen at the time (I was multitasking), but was sort of listening. Because of that, I heard the words in a different order AND sound...and I had to stop what I was doing and fell to the floor laughing, cause that almost sounded like "Se come un culo duro"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/megooli12

    As strong, maybe?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rhalfik

    -Sure, I do this exercise sixth time in a row...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piamgo

    Would “You're a tough cookie“ also be an appropiate idiom?

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