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https://www.duolingo.com/ketoacidosis

I saw this going through the new Duolingo lessons. I thought I read it wrong at first

ketoacidosis
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4 years ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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I like how it is especially bold and underlined. Really adds emphasis!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ljeanxo

Hahahaha had to laugh at this comment

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BellaLibellula

Not to cause an argument, but why does it need to be changed? Eff'd is a word. Screwed is only a substitute for it for, as far as I can tell, people who don't want to swear. I really don't see anything wrong with it. :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FelixKatze

While I would guess it was intentionally added, something which is less likely to have been intentional, is for that particular phrasing to be given as a default "correct answer" for those who get it wrong.

It would make the most sense, for that answer to be accepted as correct, but not displayed otherwise, without the user inputting it. That way, any possible offense is neatly avoided, while also accepting an obviously correct translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BellaLibellula

I agree with this entirely :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anachron

I agree. It does not seem to break the guidelines, either.

http://www.duolingo.com/guidelines

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankySka
FrankySka
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I think it should stay in there if it really best translates to f*cked. If it does and you replace it with e.g., ‘screwed’ people might assume it is not such a bad word and use it in the wrong context. It is after all a colloquial terms lessons so I would be sad if terms like that were not covered at all. However, I am coming from a country in which swearing is celebrated a lot more than in the US I guess…(as I believe it is in most of Europe - but let me know if you disagree). If you need to replace it with something, maybe just swap the u for a * as I did above. I think that should not be too offensive to people. Anyways, I am assuming people will have very divided opinions on this.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Puddleglum
Puddleglum
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In the US, swearing is fine is appropriate company, but it is not considered polite, especially in a case like this. It might shock some people. I can't think of a correct way to handle this question, as your point with it being a strong phrase is absolutely right. Maybe the lesson should have a disclaimer, or maybe the question should have a disclaimer. Maybe there should be a setting to allow for more mature words.

Here's an appropriate American idiom: That's my two cents. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankySka
FrankySka
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I totally agree: Living in the US now I have to watch my mouth. I think a note next to the translation, or maybe a pop up sign would help. In my online dictionary words are marked with '[vulg.]' - I think this would help. Yes and maybe an age setting. Did we have to give our age to sign up? I don't remember anymore.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Puddleglum
Puddleglum
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We did not. There doesn't even have to be an age setting, just one that turns mature content on and off. When a user signs up, there could be a slide in the sign up process that allows them to either turn the setting on or off and explains that it can be changed later. That would leave it up to the user's discretion and it would also be a disclaimer so no one could complain.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ker
Ker
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Hi guys, sorry about that, the sentence has been deleted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sommerlied
sommerlied
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Actually... can we have more sentences like this in the future? It can be very useful to understand when someone is swearing at you. ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arthurva
Arthurva
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I think it is a good idea - I dont think one knows a language until one knows the swear words. The dictionary has them, and we should know them. It is also useful if one is in a company that does use them as it can be the difference in knowing what's going on - or not. Its up to each to decide whether to participate in the usage. But one should know.

Incidentally, most children in most countries have a surprising suit of colourful language so its should not really be an issue, I think.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Noe010101
Noe010101
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I agree with you. That would be really usefull when for example one watches movies in a particular language, as in most movies they swear we could get to know this area of language too.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Swampwood1

I agree, I often hear groups of Spanish guys talking "smak" about someone and laughing but, have no idea of the words there using.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rk119

Can we get sentences like this in a new bonus skill? Maybe limited to users over 18, etc... some of us may want to opt in to learn these phrases.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adesva
adesva
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I'm rather sad you chose to delete it. It's the best translation and in most countries/company it's accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Puddleglum
Puddleglum
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I'm just curious, but how did it get in there? Was it just an automated translation?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arekolek
arekolek
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Why? I don't see anybody complaining!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerraZe
TerraZe
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Dictionaries online have that word and they are still considered reputable. When does one cross the line, I wonder?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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Well, you cross the line when you use it (at least in front of someone who might find it offensive). But that doesn't mean you should not know the word. You should know what it means when you hear it, that's why they are in the dictionary, and I think it would be great when you could learn such words and sentences here. Not necessarily as a lesson, but maybe in the forum in a thread where you can ask native speakers.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redneckray

Knowing what not to say is as important as knowing what to say.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pleiadian_

lol this is awesome. Please keep this, Duolingo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vedun
Vedun
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lol. just lol

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harryclark17
harryclark17Plus
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The lesson should probably come with a warning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LisaScrim

It's these funny occurrences that really make me love duolingo ... it gives it it's own unique flavour that makes it stand out from the pack of language learning tools out there.... and talk about a meme goldmine!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StanLanguages

LOL!! :D Seriously?? It's not your Photoshop skills that you trying to show? :P

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maccny
Maccny
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Hahahahahahahahaha ok you actually made ME laugh

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/856pm

Well... I guess você está ferrado.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamyoung97
adamyoung97
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Where did "It is your funeral" come from? (Out of "Você está ferrado")

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Swampwood1

The kids are going to learn this way before we do because, they want to.. It would be good if us older folks knew what they were saying ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danwizard2013
danwizard2013
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haha looks like something I read in my Spanish dictionary :-)

4 years ago