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"Ich wünsche mir ein Pony zu Weihnachten!"

Translation:I want a pony for Christmas!

December 18, 2013

56 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Winter_Relapse

This is the most useful sentence I have ever come across.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hyllning

I mean, who wouldn't? =]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RememberWWII

Me. I could do without a pony.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EoghanBostock

It says Pony can mean fringe too, so "I want a fringe for Christmas!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Not quite :) "fringe/bangs" are masculine: der Pony. So that would be "Ich wünsche mir einen Pony zu Weihnachten".

In colloquial speech, though, it would sound pretty similar as "einen" can turn into "ein'n" with just a long N at the end, or sometimes even just a normal N.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EoghanBostock

Yeah, I know. There's a hidden joke in there (not going to tell though!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PJMCD

Who else typed it in all caps?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shadow_star09

and such a cute kitten you are.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/possum404

Sounds like the people who wrote his lesson have been talking to my daughter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeCisner

der Pony = fringe, bangs

das Pony (die Ponys) = pony

Oh, German, German....

Deutsche Sprache, schwere Sprache :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vfurmanov

What is the function of mir in this sentence? Is it a reflexive verb?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithsimone

Yes, it is a reflexive verb; "sich [etwas] wünschen"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vfurmanov

Thanks, I haven't gotten to German reflexive verbs but I'm aware of their existence so I just assumed it was one if them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hipp5

Think of it as "I want for me a pony for Christmas". In English we leave that out though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slackbeard

not if you're a cartoon american though 'I WANT ME A PONY FOR CHRISTMAS AN I WANT IT NOW, I'M TELLIN YA'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shadow_star09

=] muhahahahahaaaaaaaaa


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenYoung84

Or better: "I want for myself a pony for Christmas".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kfdaugherty

"I want me a pony!" Seems legit ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SandraAlvarez76

I was wondering the same - could you leave it out and just say, "Ich mochte ein pony?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, that's similar.

"sich etwas wünschen" is to make a wish for something; "etwas möchten" is simply to want something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VelliCapelli

I suppose "I wish a pony for Christmas" should be also true.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abendbrot

Yes, it should be right too. It is normal that 'wünschen' is a reflexive verb in Germany. Because it is reflexive one needs 'mir'.

Some examples:

  • Ich wünsche mir Kekse. = I wish to get cookies.
  • Ich wünsche dir alles Gute. = I wish you all the best.

  • Ich wünsche mir Kekse nur für mich. = I wish to get cookies only for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sooz5002

Yes but it doesn't sound right in English. You could say "I wish for a pony for Christmas"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnJPershing

Vote Vermin Supreme 2016. Free ponies for everyone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/savourtardis

Too bad the word for hippopotamus isn't in the course, although of course that presents its own set of difficulties including care and feeding and even getting it into the house in the first place. ...Probably better it doesn't after all.

(For anyone who is now confused, there's a novelty Christmas song called "I Want a Hippopotamus For Christmas".)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaggsQ

singing Only a hippopotamus will doooooo!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KoukiElska

Is there a reason to use "wünsche" rather than "will"? Or can they be synonymous like "Want/Wish for" in English? Is one more polite, maybe?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RandomCanadian12

I think you have it with "want/wish for"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianOrIsIt

I just love the way the audio says "Pony"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jsiehler

Ich wünsche mir das beste Pony zu Weihnachten, Prinzessin Luna!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maxfield_Solar

how would you turn this into a question? In statement form it requires "Ich" - verb - "mir." So far to make a question we've been taught to switch the verb and the subject, but how does that work with the "mir"?

To make this a more practical question, I'll change this to second person so the statement would read — "Du wünsche dir ein Pony zu Weihnachten". So as a question would it be "Wünsche du dir ..." or "Wünsche dir du ..." or something else?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/briandavidpowers

Why is "mir" in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VelliCapelli

Ich wünsche mir ein Pony zu Weihnachten! - Think of it as "I want for me a pony for Christmas" As I want it, but I want it for me. Or I wish me to recieve a pony for Christmas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trinthetweety

Literal translation: I want me a pony fo christmas! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

If we're being literal, "I wish me a pony to Christmas" is closer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KrasimirDimitrov

What's wrong with "I wish myself a pony" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Multi0Lingual4

Because that's the literal translation, and bad English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crystal-Dragons

ICH WUNSCHE MIR EIN PONY ZU WEIHNACHTEN!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StevenFi

What's wrong with 'I hope I get a pony...'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jakatom_

i wish ...=ich wunche i want=ich will i hope=ich hoffe


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jason354

I written " I wish for me a pony on Christmas" can't that be right since mir is written.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/opportunista

cannot it be: I wish myself a pony for christmas? it's marker as wrong and it's "Ich wunsche mir.."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

That sounds like a German speaking English, but not like natural English to me.

You can't just translate word for word; it has to sound reasonable in the other language as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cimekiko

me too duo...me too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/apmaster

Is wunschen an intransitive verb? (i.e.d es it always require a recipient pronoun when used? ) Mir in this case..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It is a transitive verb - the direct object is the thing you wish for (the pony, in this example).

You do need to name the person who should benefit, though -- either you wish for something for yourself, as here, or you can wish something on someone else, as in "Ich wünsche dir frohe Weihnachten!" (I wish you merry Christmas!).

(Actually, in the second sense, you can use it without naming the recipient. "Er kam rein und hat frohe Weihnachten gewünscht" - He came in and wished merry Christmas. The context would indicate that he wished it to us, the people already in the room.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulStogov

Duo does't accept "X-mas" word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FreekVerkerk

"I wish me a pony for Christmas" ??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

That would be a fairly literal translation, yes, and one I might hear from a German who is learning English.

It's not something I'd expect to hear from a native English speaker. "I wish me a pony" simply sounds wrong to me.

"I wish for a pony" could work, or "I wish for a pony for myself" if you want to translate the mir, though "I wish for a pony for myself for Christmas" has lots of "for" in it, which sounds a bit inelegant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mucca12

Thats a bit tto much


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasStru3

Bitte!

I wants don't get

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