Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"This book is in Persian, not in Turkish."

Translation:Bu kitap Farsça, Türkçe değil.

2 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/GastonDorren
GastonDorren
  • 16
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2

How am I to analyse 'Farsça': as an adjective meaning 'Persian-language', as in 'a Persian-language book' (where English does not use an adjective)? Or is it rather a noun, used in some way I do not quite understand?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexinNotTurkey
AlexinNotTurkey
Mod
  • 25
  • 23
  • 21
  • 18
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 399

Really coming from a historical perspective, it is an adverb. It would mean "like a Persian." Language names in general have a lot of blurred lines in Turkish. They normally do not have case endings on them (or rather, they have them in fewer cases than nouns) and behave like adjectives, nouns, and adverbs.

Imagine it here like it means something like "in the style of Persia" :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YakinAlan
YakinAlan
  • 17
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6

I copy my comment from another discussion, it may help: " Names of languages are always nouns but you can see them used like adjectives like in the case "Türkçe Kitap" which means "book in Turkish". This doesn't have the same meaning with "Türkçe Kitabı" which means a "book which teaches Turkish". In the former case you see a noun pretending as an adjective since "Kitap" doesn't have any suffix. But actually even in that case Turkish grammar doesn't take it as an adjective. This is another type of noun phrase which is called "takısız isim tamlaması".

In case of nationalities you need to use them as adjectives.

Example: İngiliz futbolcu

This exactly means the soccer player's nationality.

But check the example: İngiliz atı

Here we need the suffix "-ı" for "at" (horse) since it is not a nationality, it is an origin, a race.

"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GastonDorren
GastonDorren
  • 16
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 2

So while the football player is English himself, the horse is 'of the English', 'as the English have' - like that? Pretty subtle stuff, this. Thanks to both of you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YakinAlan
YakinAlan
  • 17
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6

Yes, exactly. For the time being it is enough to know that nationalities (or ethnicities) such as "İngiliz, Fransız, Alman, Türk, Rus, İtalyan, İspanyol, Japon, Arap" etc. have to be used before a non-suffixed noun, otherwise they will refer to an origin.

2 years ago