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"Viele Köche verderben den Brei."

Translation:Too many cooks spoil the broth.

December 18, 2013

356 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jedglazner

I'm from the western us and there we simply just say 'too many cooks in the kitchen' - implying that whatever they are cooking will be spoiled.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laresbernardo

In Spanish we say "Too many hand on the soup will turn it purple". It's kind of the same meaning really!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CMcV1

is it "muchas manos en la sopa ponen el caldo morado"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhileasKet

En Argentina se dice: "Muchas manos en un plato hacen mucho garabato"

In Argentina it is said: " Many hands on one plate make a lot of mess"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ishto7

In Persian we say: "Two hands on a plate makes it salty or without so"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrenodeMed

We have same one in Brazil. Com muitos cozinheiros, ou sai ensolço ou sai salgado = with too many cooks it'll turn out saltless or salty.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/psanati

I have never heard that. Good to know we have the same idiom.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mosesakbari

آشپز که دو تا شد آش یا شور میشه یا بی نمک


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/enilevkay

I like better the ones that rhyme! =)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sumudul

I've heard "too many cooks, spoil the soup"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zurrich

In spanish it does


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laresbernardo

Totally right! ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hernandari6

It is "muchas manos en la sopa la ponen morada"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carlos455272

Si .. muchas manos ponen el caldo aguado.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/killerman64

אני מדבר עברית, אבל מה משמעות השם שלך


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lgalarra

I am a Spanish speaker and first time I hear it, but the idea is clear. I am also learning Spanish with Duolingo :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SergioOQ

Yeah, me too. I guess it is a regional idiom


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/engfast3

'Too many cooks spoil the broth' is a very well-known British proverb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Otto_Didactyl

quite popular in the States as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bynny2015

I put, "Too many cooks spoil the soup" and Duolingo accepted it, but gave "Too many cooks spoil the broth" as another correct answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bartlam

Yes l know it has a well know say in English !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alan501444

Really? Because I'm English and have never heard of this till now. "Too many cooks in the kitchen" on the other hand is a common saying


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elischluckauf

Nice. I'm Spanish I've never heard it before. I guess it's a regional one. Good to go to bed with a new thing learnt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NimMalt

Always funny getting to learn new things about your own language here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/acachipum

It's funny to learn something in your own language when trying to study idioms in German xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Werwulfich

I am from Ukraine. But my first native is russian. Once I spoke with an american man. He speaks spanish. He said in spanish one word means the wether and the time. I am talking about "tempo". I was realy surprised. Later I thought about that fact and I found more amasing fact for me. In the russian language the root in the word wich means the weather is also similar with one of a word wich means some time period. поГОДа , ГОД, подождать( часто говорят поГОДить). So let's learn forign languages for beter understanding native.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdmore93

I've never heard of it before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lohrfra

Where do you say that? I'm from Spain and I haven't heard that ever.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Honiarez

In Poland we say "Where six cooks, there's nothing to eat" :D Of course, because they spoiled everything... and it rhymes in polish :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

But in Polish 6 cooks-women, not cooks-men: "Gdzie kucharek sześć, tam nie ma co jeść" :) Non-politically correct, either


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bush6984

Konrad-Michal, are you helping as a contributor for the Polish DL course? I can't wait until it's done!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

I would love to and I applied, but they haven't invited me so far...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivanitta1

In Serbian: "Mnogo babica, kilava deca" (sth.like: Where are too many nurses/midwifes/grannies, lousy child/children).. äquivalent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Llaakkii

Uze mi reč iz usta. Npr


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ObiZenobi

That is realy interesting. I can't seem to find a matching Slovenian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BartoszCel1

In polish: Gdzie kucharek sześć, tam nie ma co jeść:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FaperNoster

... Tam cycków dwanaście :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Waeljp

In Arabic "كتر الأيادي بتحرق الطبخة" >> "many hands burns the cooking" ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erhaqim

You dont seem Arabian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/weini306

In chinese,we say"三个和尚没水喝"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna_Bilbao

Hahaha. But really, is it about cooks?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaeus729

It actually translates to 3 monks (Buddhist ones) have no water to drink. There is a story behind it, which I forgot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epingchris

It's basically a fable about monks having to bring back water to the mountaintop (or something like that) where they live. When there was only one monk, he did it alone and got by fine; when there were two monks they started to fight over who should do it (in some versions they cooperated); but when there were three monks, they fought so much that they broke the barrels, so in the end no one had water to drink. There are many variations to it.

So the complete version is: "一個和尚挑水喝,兩個和尚搶水喝,三個和尚没水喝" (yíge héshàng tiāo shuǐ hē, liǎngge héshàng qiǎng shuǐ hē, sānge héshàng méi shuǐ hē)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Barrbelle

We have a similar saying in the midwest (U.S.) about work from boys (like splitting firewood or weeding in the garden): 1 boy is worth a boy; 2 boys are worth half a boy; 3 boys are worth no boy at all! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CynthiaXu5

it's so exciting to see Chinese here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mathildabee

we say too many cooks spoil the broth here, too. It doesn't only have to refer to cooking. Any project where too many people are "piping in" (giving their opinion) the main idea or focus just gets spread too thin. (watered down)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bartlam

So in german brie is Broth Ok no other answer is corect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stevestewart0001

No. Remember this is an idiomatic expression: you cannot translate from these directly into English. "Brei" is the idiomatic word in the German expression which conveys the same meaning as the English "too many cooks spoil the broth". Brei is more like the English "porridge" :-).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epingchris

Alternatively, there is an idiom which means something similar: 人多口雜 (rén duō kǒu zá), which translates literally to "Many people, many (discordant) voices"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kris6284

In Marsian we say: @$$//#@@^^ ^/$##£__ %==$$#_&&^$£££€/$$€=÷÷× which is exactly the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erinwall

I'm Canadian and I've always heard it that way too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aidity

Canadian here too... Can't say I've ever heard that idiom before


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andreasbou6

You have i have never heard it in... Toronto at least


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bush6984

Central Ohio here. I've heard "too many cooks in the kitchen" as well as "too many chiefs, not enough Indiens" (that one's a wee tad non-PC, but people use it as an idiomatic expression nonetheless)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/holly.k.ma

I'm in wisconsin and i heard something similiar "too many Chefs not enough cooks"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KonaBjarkar

I'm in Tennessee (Virginia border) and I usually hear "too many cooks (will) spoil the pot," and "too many chiefs and not enough injuns..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mathildabee

that's even less pc than what bush6984 said!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KirZhukov

слава Україні!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bush6984

Would that be "slava Ukraini"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/polomare

Agreed. I've heard it even shorter. "Too many cooks!" Usually when a coworker is annoyed that other coworkers are honing in on his/her project.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karlo-Josi

In Croatia we say: 'Puno baba, kilavo dijete' which means 'Many midwifes, child will be lazy' It has the same meaning as the one with soup.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobynLiebe1

Afrikaans : Te veel hande verderf die sop


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tpfirmin

Coming from Britain I've grown up with this one and I'd be inclined to say it's older than your country ;)

All much of a muchness really though (another you may not have heard)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mery_mgh

In Persian we say "ashpaz ke do ta shod ghaza ya shoor mishe ya binamak" meaning when there are two cooks the food becomes either salty or bland!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johnny10010

The swedish version is "ju fler kockar desto sämre soppa" which translates into "the more chefs the worse soup"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Faux3

Exactly what mom says here in the midwest...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charizard177

cool! you took it from your side of view!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oli472794

In Poland it's ,,gdzie kucharek sześć, tam nie ma co jeść'' ,,where there's six she-cooks, there's nothing to eat''


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tersivwz

Well too many cooks will spoil the broth, but they'll fill our hearts with so much love! Too many cooks. Too many cooks. Too many cooks. Too many cooks. Too many cooks. Too many cooks. Too many cooks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pelrun

When it comes to the future, you can never have Too Many Cooks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AkiraBrewer

It takes a lot to make a broth...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neiyj

In Korean we say 사공이 많으면 배가 산으로 간다, which means 'if there's too many people rowing, the ship goes up to the mountain'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamMasters

Hmm, I've always heard, Too many cooks spoil the soup.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paige42

Agreed! That was what I tried first.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

Accepts that now. Thanks to whoever reported it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scott.daley

I've actually never heard this idiom in English... no wonder I got it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RossInScotland

We say this exact phrase in Scotland, possibly UK wide.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stevestewart0001

It is indeed a UK wide expression.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DPGriffin

A similar English idiom is "Too many cooks in the kitchen."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaiMaxfield

Yeah, I was born and raised in Utah, USA, and have never heard of anything like it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaiMaxfield

And I just don't get it; it seems like there are always "too many indians, and not enough chiefs", as I grew up saying. Would you really use an idiom like this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahSalaz7

That expression carries a slightly different meaning: everybody wants to be in charge and nobody wants to do the real work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SS80121

In Chinese, the most "official" form of this idiom is "三个和尚没水吃" (sān gè hé shang méi shuǐ chī), which literally means three monks won't get any water to drink. Actually the complete version says when there's only one monk, he retrieves water himself, and when there are two monks they think that neither should do nothing and yet still get to drink so they carry water together, but when there are three, they all think the others should do the work and no one ends up fetching water.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SS80121

But i'm from Beijing and i personally think the idiom in our dialect "鸡多不下蛋,人多打瞎乱" (when there's too many hens, they won't lay eggs; when there's too many people, they can do nothing but cause a mess) is a better equivalent for this idiom! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hero0512118

I am from Taiwan, and I heard the idom "一個和尚挑水喝,兩個和尚抬水喝,三個和尚沒水喝"(one monk feches water, two monks work together, but three monks work nothing)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khaled.Dawood

I speak Arabic and we have a saying in Egypt similar to that "A boat with two captains would sink"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Somaia4

You are right and we write it like this" القارب التي لها قائدان تغرق "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/esghaei

Nice idiom:) In Persian we say: "If the cook becomes two, the soup will become either salty or tasteless!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mohammad.tv

Salam hamvatan. Bache kojay? Agha bazi chiza ro b manam yad midi? B har hal shoma term balai hastin dg. Merc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ildottormaglia

"quann tropp add' candan nun fà mai giorn'" - when too many roosters sing, the day never comes; southern italian dialect... Tschuss!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pat5120

In Thai, we say "มากหมอมากความ" which means "Too many doctors will make it worse"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erikman

I've always heard 'too many cooks spoil the stew' in English, but this was marked wrong (I reported it).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamMasters

The thing is with idioms, there are so many variations!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OgnjenG.

In Serbian we say "Mnogo babica, kilavo dete", which could be literally be translated as "Too many midwives make child loose"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Radmilce

Yes, I am Macedonian and we also say "Mnogu babi, kilavo dete" which is translated "Too many grandmothers spoil the child"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bobyrev

The Ukrainian equivalent is "Де багато няньок, там дитя каліка", which means "Too many nurses have a disabled baby". In Russian it is said "У семи нянек дитя без глаза", which means "Seven nurses have a baby without an eye".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

I like it! Can няньок also mean baby-sitters? I can't wait the Ukrainian course on DL!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bobyrev

Konrad-Michal, yes, in this context that is the exact meaning: nanny, baby-sitter, child nurse - all are applicable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

That's what I thought since baby-sitter is in Polish niania.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olejjjnik

Not without an eye )))) only without attendance


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/villyh

Same in Bulgaria. "Много баби, хилаво дете" - "Many grandmothers, spoiled child".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kernowboy

Unusual translation!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sallairita

Hungarian also: sok bába közt elvész a gyerek. It also means too many midwives will loose the child


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Smurfette100

Hvala, trebalo bi mi sto godina da se sjetim! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CassieBrenda

I'm from California and I have never heard the stew version. I've only heard in California and in Kansas where my family came from: Too many cooks spoil the broth.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laurali228

They must have listened to your advice; that saying works now. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TobiasWS

Thanks, that is probably why it accepted my "stew"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fbruno916

It takes a lot to make a stew


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nadavled

But they'll fill our heart with so much love..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zernyu

And we have Brooks's Law in the software development world! :) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brooks's_law


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rafid1976

This sentence is missing ((Zu)) in the begining !.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mythdael

Agreed. They are missing zu and mark you wrong later when you don't put it in 'cos you didn't know it was there!! :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rodrik1406

But what difference does it make in the translation to add it or not? What does is mean with and without "Zu"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Not_Dead

"Zu" is literally "too". So without it, it is just "many cooks spoil the broth". "Zu" makes it "too many cooks".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stocky1000

I'm English and the phrase we use is "Too many cooks spoil the broth", I don't know why the suggestion is porridge, that may just be the German version, but the English idiom uses broth.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnbax10

well, it uses broth now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KirZhukov

russian phrase is: у семерых нянек дитя не кормлено. literally: seven nannies leave the baby hungry


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pexus037

Even so: " У семи нянек дитя без глазу". That literally means "with seven nannies a child would lose an eye"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FreekVerkerk

In Dutch, there is a saying ""Geen twee kapiteins op één schip". Literally : No two captains on bord of one ship" . It is nice to read all the "translations" in different languages. Apparently the germans are more into cooking :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avalinah

it's too hard to answer these when i'm not natively English or American.. i know all these idioms in my own language, but i don't know all of them in English... there should be a way to translate more directly, because even if you get the idea right, you exchange one word for a sinonim and you lose..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16

I don't think we're supposed to answer we're supposed to learn. Although I may know them in English I certainly don't know the German. Mostly I check "don't know the answer' lose a heart then hope next time I see it I'll remember. Sometimes I take notes. Then I keep retrying hoping it may sink in. I like this section because it feels like we're learning how real people talk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16

Yes, but as you see from native English speakers on this page there are so many variations anyone could get it wrong. I have started making notes and will try to learn them by memory (aka 'by heart'). So, far I'm on my third "retry".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamMasters

:D I've tried quite a few more times than that! And haven't got it all right yet....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16

Yes, I've had several "retries" since I last posted and I'm enjoying it very much.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SS80121

I just like the few where you hover the mouse over the first word and they give you the whole translation :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

The comments here are unrepresentative. You have to remember there are teenagers, people from far-flung colonies, and the sort of people who write YouTube comments. No educated speaker of standard English could fail to spot the idiom Too many cooks spoil the broth here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ralimaru

In my country we say "too many priests for a mass"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeCisner

Where's that? I really enjoy learning about the different variations around the world.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stevestewart0001

That's genius! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shahab.vesali

Iranian people say: "when there are two chefs, the food will be either salty or saltless!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenaCs94

In Norway we say "The more cooks, the more mess." :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linamkraw

in arabic we have the exact same idiom "كترة الطباخيين بتنزع الطبخة"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Somaia4

But it is not لغة عربية فصحى ^_^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kobrina

Brei means mash :s


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chanelle04

O i thought it was porridge...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shaho.F

Have you notice "Zu" in the beginning of the sentence that have added recently : Zu viele koche ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gabriele.g7

In Italy we would use "Ci son troppi galli a cantare nel pollaio" that roughly translates in "There are too many cocks singing in the roost".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cieszson

Polish: "Gdzie kucharek sześć, tam nie ma co jeść"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mythdael

Awesome!! I wish duolingo did polish, I had so many good polish friends in my last town : D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Honiarez

Tak, to dokładnie to samo :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mostdermann

In persian we say: When we have two chefs food would would be salty or empty of salt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarinadeFrontale

And France there is no saying like that, cause french people dont messed up with food


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/musick82

why is the first dictionary hind porridge but porridge is not accepted as an answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamMasters

Because they are looking more for the equivilent idiom in our language than for a literal translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MissPsychoB

It's still not fair not to accept porridge if a literal translation is acceptable too. The idiom still works with any food. I get so annoyed when I lose hearts over stupid stuff like this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciaJH

Report it via the "Report a Problem" button. The German staff sends you a nice little email when they accept it. (The Spanish staff never has...)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CMcV1

the spanish staff did answer me once


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greenfire315

Lol really? That's kinda funny but annoying if you are learning Spanish . . .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miketwo345

If you're translating an idiom literally, you're missing the entire point of the lesson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mollydot

Not necessarily. I want to be able to do both. Otherwise I'm saying words I don't understand, even if I understand the whole sentence. I don't want to end up thinking Fass = camel.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stevestewart0001

Idioms must never be thought of as a string of individual words to be translated, but as a single entity. The aim is to make you understood in a foreign tongue. E.g. to say "porridge" in instead of "broth" would sound very odd, in that the idiom as a whole would be missed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/matanov

Porridge is now accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stevestewart0001

It shouldn't be: there is no such idiom in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ionosuke

In (venezuelan) spanish: "Muchas manos en la sopa ponen el caldo morado"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boesgaard

The Danish version of this idiom is: "For mange kokke fordærver maden". Literally "Too many cooks spoils the food".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/telge

In Hungarian we say: Common horse gets wounded back.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/enilevkay

I know this one in Portuguese: 'é muito cacique pra pouco índio' (there are too many indian chefs for too few indians). I always think how funny this is… =D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brandizzi

In Portuguese version. it means too many people giving orders. I have the feeling that the English and German sayings ame more aboit many people doing something, not necessarily giving orders. Am I right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Russell28

Too many chiefs and not enough indians


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mohammad.tv

In our country we say " where two cooks, the food is insipidus (low salt) or salty


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CandaceLei

In Chinese (well, more in the Cantonese dialect) we say 人多手腳亂 Roughly it means too many people mess things up. Another thing, may I know what exactly Brei is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lewis.smith540

I hear this all the time, must be more of a British saying


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattJurkov

I said "viele Ķöche...oh f*** you" when I stuffed up and got marked correct. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/msdousti

In Persian: "Two chefs make the pottage either salty or unsalted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mhmdghfr

In Persian it is said: (آشپز که دو تا شد آش یا شور میشود یا بی نمک) that is literally translated to: When cooks become two the broth would be either briny or bland.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KurtisBuel

Some parts of the U.S. use "brew" rather than "broth" for this idiom and should be accepted as an alternate translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JFSebastian1

The greek version is "πολλές οι μαμές το παιδί ζαβό" which means "too many midwifes, the kid becomes a retard"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Otto_Didactyl

Have you noticed that idioms get the most comments?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlairScots

I am southern American and these have been easy so far because we have so many idioms of our own, "it'll make your head spin!" lol!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CandaceLogan

Too many hands in the pot. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ayresfam

I don't know how old this saying may be but I have gold toed socks older than 23 years!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liplee

i put "too many cooks spoil the oatmeal" and it marked me right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anthonystevenson

Terlalu banyak Koki/Pemasak merusak makanan Too many Cooks destroy foods About same meaning in Indonesian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Khazbreen

I am brazilian and never listened anything like this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brandizzi

Not even "muito cacique para pouco índio?" ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robertoIlidio

I think it is more like: "Cachorro com muitos donos morre de fome", no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zachary.wo

I've always heard it as too many cooks spoil the broth


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ximajs

The idiom is more a test of how well I know English idioms, since the German ones are often similar to Norwegian ones, or I don't know enough English idioms. Ffs


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16

Not really. If you get close to the meaning your answer will be accepted then you'll see the "proper" English version and you'll have learned an idiom in two languages. The idiom section tends to be much more forgiving of errors than the other sections. I made copies of the idioms (using Quizlets) so I could learn them as they so often don't follow normal grammar construction. Check out this post:

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/4821654


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ximajs

Well, I didn't get it right because I forgot whether it was broth or brew. The Norwegian idiom literally translates to "The more cooks, the more mess", so it's not similar enough that I can guess what it is in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joaof98

Anybody knows the translation in portuguese please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brandizzi

It would be something like "Cozinheiros demais estragam a sopa." However, Portuguese has some idioms in this line, such as "cachorro com muitos donos morre de fome" as suggested by robertoIlidio.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thiagoroch970125

My grandma used to say " quatro mãos não fazem um bolo"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VasileqVas

In romanian we say: un vapor nu poate sa aiba doi capitani. It means: a sheep can't has two captains.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/savourtardis

Do you mean ship? ;) I think there's an Italian term "vaporetto" (or something like that) which I think refers to a sort of boat, and ships do often have captains. (Apparently the Dutch do captains for such an idiom as well)

Romanian looks like it might sound pretty (although if anything like me, you may not feel qualified to judge the sound of your native language); I don't think I've ever heard it spoken before. And I don't mean to mock your English (which is pretty understandable), it's just that the idea of a woolly animal having one captain, let alone two, is a funny mental image. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/behnammohs

in persian we say:"if there are two cooks the meal is either salty or tasteless!" آشپز که دوتا شد غذا یا شور میشه یا بی نمک


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fad23
  • 1987

I think no one has mentioned the YouTube video "Too Many Cooks." Now I've got a theme song racing around my skull.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/siajibi

Yes we have it in persian too, if the number of cooks becomes two, food would be salty or without :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mouss12

It is the same as arabian qeute: " كثرة الطباخين تنزع الطبخة "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TripCode

I love reading the different versions in everyone's languages, so cool! Too bad, though, that I have never heard this phrase or anything like it, despite being a native Anglophone myself. :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nextery

In Polish we say "Where are six (female) cooks there's nothing to eat" ("Gdzie kucharek sześć tam nie ma co jeść")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WissamAl-Sheikh

in Arabic we say too many cooks ruin the meal it is the same . we are the same human beings


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meirgiler

In hebrew you have "two kings in one crown" or "two kings on one seat" which have the same meaning. שני מלכים בכתר אחד


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoneySHS

In Persian we have"ashpaz ke do ta beshe, ash ya shour mishe ya binamak-آشپز که دوتا بشه, آش یا شور میشه یا بی نمک" meaning literally :cook becomes two, the soup becomes either salty or bland (between two cooks, the soup becomes either salty or bland. )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pratiksha805858

Can someone give me the exact translation for this idiom?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvanEdinger

TOO MANY COOKS!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arianna71490

In greek we have a similar phrase which is literally translated as: "where too many roosters crow, the dawn comes late" or something like that :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wutever0

What's the literal translation of the sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/svenskgurkan

So the Turkish meaning of it may be "Nerede çokluk, orada bokluk".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidMarti71932

In Mexico it is said "Entre dos. Se quema el arroz" In between two. The rice is burnt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Athalwulfaz

Cognates with: "Fele cooks fortharf the bree."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielley22

what does it mean this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16

It means that if there are too many people involved in a job, project etc it will come out wrong. "Broth" is a kind of soup.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zmajche34

If too many people try to be the boss, they spoil everything. (source: wiktionary)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ayresfam

Viele Koche verderben den Bre. Finally I get to type the answer before it says it's incorrect!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lukeng89

English saying is: Too many chefs spoil the broth Marked correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

No, chef is a recent loanword. The idiom uses "cooks".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daniel-levin

Why does verderben not mean destroyed here? How is it supposed to be used?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeliriumOxide

Here, "verderben" means "to [bring to] ruin," and when speaking of food, it would generally mean "to spoil/become spoiled." I think Zerstören is more fit for "to destroy" more literally. Zu viele Köchen zerstören die Restaurant... ^^;


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mohammad.tv

Farsa inja zarbolmasal ziyad darana


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paul948

why is "a lot of cooks spoil the porridge" considered incorrect :s


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bluesim

I think this is because you use "a lot" to describe things like quantities of water, weight of flour but "many" (or in this case "too many") is used when you can only have integer (whole number) quantities of things. It is like the difference between "much" and "many".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stone.Keith

this must a very very very old saying, because in all my 23 years I have never heard this saying in any language...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/troffelfruen

Or you are still quite young ;) I'm ten years older than you and have heard it in several.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/m.Chehrazad

In Iran we have a proverb mostly same as people in Spain do! We say: “when the number of chefs gets two, the soup will get either sour or insipid“


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dr.aya.faw

In arabic the same meaning but completely different exprestion Two captains in the ship make it sink


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eidorian89

I read it as 'many cooks spoil the broth', but I understood it wrong. I thought it was saying something along the lines of even cooks spoil the broth sometimes, so I wrote 'nobody's perfect'. Does viele always mean 'too many'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mollydot

I'm not sure, but from comments above, I think it should start with "zu". Can a German speaker comment?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swift50

Should it not be Zu viele Köche verderben den Brei?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diegoprs

I can't say it. If I say fast, it understands all wrong. If I say slowly, it understands only the "Viele Köche" part, and the recognition stops, giving me an error lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yegomosc

In Polish is "gdzie kucharek sześć tam nie ma co jeść"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anett35

In hungarian it is: "Két dudás nem fér meg egy csárdában."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bluesim

In Swedish it even rhymes: "Ju fler kockar, desto sämre soppa"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Momo.Reza

In persian we say if we have two cooks, the food will be salty, or it will be too sweet آشپز که دو تا شد غذا یا شور میشه یا شیرین


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmedAhdmm

In arabic we say : A ship can not be driven by tow captains ,or the same meanning السفينة لا تمشى بريسين


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emanahmed322534

wie kann mann das auf Arabisch sagen?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ebrahim968078

كثرة الطباخين تنزع الطبخة


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmadOsama94

So is it "Eine Hand wäscht die andere" or "Viele Köche verderben den Brei" ?? :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonVonDavis

I typed one of the actual meanings of Brei in (mash), and it counted it as wrong. What gives?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnMoser1

I don't know. I reported that, because it made sense to me. Mash is beer in progress.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deepfriedmcrib

I always thought that it was "too many cooks spoils the broth." The subject "too many cooks" is actually third person singular because it is a single collection. Let "team blue" represent "too many cooks." The sentence then becomes "team blue spoils the broth."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

That seems acceptable to me. Like "eggs is eggs".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KnightFoster

At this point in learning idioms, I've realized why it was something to 'unlock', as it has absolutely nothing to do with communication as virtually everything here is angering to try and interpret.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alielsayed

In Egypt we say : the boat with two bosses sink


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Allypop95

"Too many cooks spoil the broth." Incorrect. I apparently forgot the will. ;-;


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WQ_Pheh

How to pronouce (verderben) ??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmedSafwa8

In arabic we got it a little bit different..means "the ship which has two captains, it sinks"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pashimomo

How could this saying interpreted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarsonMaca

I accidently wrote 'Too many cocks spoil the broth'. Roughly translates to 'Too many ❤❤❤❤❤ on the dancefloor' or 'Sausage fest'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KangPillLee

"사공이 많으면 배가 산으로 간다." In Südkorea.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FedorScheg

When I looked at the hints I thought it said "too many cookies spoil the broth" lol. Has anyone else done the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amyvn

Vietnamesisch: Lắm thầy thối ma


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ina2805

In Croatia we say: Puno baba, kilavo dijete. In english: A lot of grandmothers, spoiled kid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ToxicThing

Here in Serbia, we have a saying: too many midwifes bring a poor baby.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sheperd710

Hey do you pronounce viele? Sounds like "Fi-le"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arif5529

In Turkish In a mass there shall be ❤❤❤❤ lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/altay721607

It is used in Turkish as "Horozu çok olan köyde sabah geç olur"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aesmoe

In Arabic it is, (المركب التي لها رُبَّانان، تغرق).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leventdivilioglu

Similiar to the saying in turkish "Bir gemide iki kaptan olmaz"; which means: "There won't be two captain in a single ship"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Farzan77

آشپز که دوتا شد آش یا شور شد یا بینمک same in. Persian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr.NuTella.

عندنا في مصر : المركب اللي بريسين تغرق


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stevestewart0001

Maybe this thread is a case of too many cooks spoiling the broth, lol!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/botetta

This just made me realize that I am far from being good at german


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErfanHashe2

In persian we say: When two cooks want to make a soup,it will be salty or without any salt at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yarr13

Finally, Duo accepting a real translation rather than a equivalent meaning idiom in another language that was ot pre-given.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scherjuli

Sok bába közt elvész a gyermek.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peritreet

In Norwegian we say. More chefs, more spill.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexlantern

Why does viele mean "too many" instead of "so many?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stevestewart0001

It doesn't. It just means "many". In the German idiom there is no "too". Otherwise it would be "zu viele".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.fake

In Russia we say "too many nannies have the child lost the eye"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andreasbou6

What does this mean... i dont understand deutsch metaphors


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SEHutch1

I just want to say I was daydreaming and wrote "Too many cooks spoil the fairy". Has this happened to anyone else?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sepide393827

In persian we say: two cooks for a dish,makes that salty or with out salt


[deactivated user]

    What does broth mean?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stevestewart0001

    A broth is like a soup.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrancescaG296960

    I don't know if it is standard italian or regional, but we say "the dog with too many masters died of hunger" - "il cane con tanti padroni morì di fame"...a bit creepier than the German one... XD


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Taka195219

    Looking at how all the other languages in the world have similar idioms is actually more interesting than studying haha :)

    In Japanese we say "Too many captains on a ship makes it climb a mountain"!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/milavva

    This is so sweet, in russian we say 'у семи нянек дитя без глазу' which literally means 'seven nannies have a child without one eye'


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jesus_Squared

    I'm a native English speaker in the United States, and not once have I ever heard anyone utter this sentence!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IvanKnezov1

    We have this but for making babys.too many (girl that hels you give birth midwife?) makes the child spoiled


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ornithoryn1

    it's really interesting that there are so many languages and from completely different language families that have a similar idiom In French I can't think of anything along these lines there probably exists but it's not popular at all I wonder if reveals anything on society


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArthurHayt

    Or according to one version of the seven dwarfs "too many crooks spoil the brothel"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reza_ebrz

    What does it mean? - word to word of this idom


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 572

    It means that if there are too many people working on the same thing, the result is going to turn out worse.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kernowboy

    In German the literal translation for this is: Veile Köchen vederben den Brei Much cooks ruin the pulp


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 572

    “(Too) many cooks ruin the mash/mush” is probably a better translation. Brei is basically any kind of semi-solid food. It can also be used for non-edible substances of a similar texture, but the basic (and in this case intended) meaning refers to a kind of food.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zosia521937

    In Polish we say something like that: Where is 6 cooks there is nothing to eat


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RohinGhosh

    A literal translation of this please?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 572

    Cf. my answer to kernowboy’s question above.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IvanCheshm1

    In Bulgaria we say "Many grannies skinny kid" , "Много баби, хилаво дете"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    "skinny" is correct.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IvanCheshm1

    Yup, right. Danke!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haneen767742

    In syria we say too many hands in one cook will burn it (كتر الايدين بتحرق الطبخة)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrubbaFong

    Many comments but few addressing pronunciation oddity. It sounds like the voice is saying "ferDAHLben deen bye" when pronouncing "verdelben den Brei", to me. Points being, where is the "r" in Brei, and "deen" instead of "denn", and "del" pronounced liked "a" in "father"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angi93484

    yo lo conozco como "muchas manos en un plato causan arrebato", y también se usa la traducción literal " demasiados cocineros arruinan la sopa" :p


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StockyPhil

    Spacing needs to be adjusted so each word's meaning can be seen. Maybe hide what the whole sentence means at first so we focus on individual words and direct translations?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dominic658333

    in Chinese it's called "人多手杂"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rafa12012

    In polish it is: gdzie kucharek sześć, tam nie ma co jeść which translates roughly to if there are six cooks there's nothing to eat :D


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdgarRodri753495

    Mucha gente que ayudando no sirve, o eso entendí in spanisch, Kolumbien spanisch


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BravoIhi

    In berber in North Africa we say, the 'ship sinks if there are lot of captains'


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ployche

    I don't know if someone posted this before, but in Russian it's "7 babysitters can't watch for the child". "У 7 нянек дитя без глазу"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrevJamesC.

    whats up fuckers why you on my phone ❤❤❤❤ you thats why


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhillipPap1

    Can't read the translation of individual words when I press them. I'm curious as to what the sentence actually says verbatim


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 572

    “Many cooks spoil the mush.”


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rigid.corpse

    What exactly does this mean ? Wish meanings were given as well.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    The German sentence is an idiom which means the same as the English idiom “Too many cooks spoil the broth”.

    This course is for speakers of English and assumes that you already speak English.

    If you have difficulties with English words or idioms, you will have to turn to other resources.

    For example, https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/broth?q=Broth explains this idiom in simple English words.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanB892778

    Not being able to see the literal transations of some of the individual words inhibits learning in this lesson. Maybe it is different on a desktop, but on mobile (Android) I cannot see each word's translation when I tap the word. The dropdown display that comes up is not properly formatted to display all of the information that is in that dropdown.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Azedine10828

    في الجزائر نقول بالعامية " خبزة عشرة ما طيب "


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Azedine10828

    في الجزائر نقول بالعامية :''خبزة عشرة ما طيب... و إذا طابت تنحرق'' the bread of ten cooks can't be cooked,if so it will be burned


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 572

    EDIT: Please ignore; I both misunderstood the question and didn’t think about the fact that English uses the same idiom with a different kind of food.

    Does “broth” refer to a homogenous food-paste (like this for example) in your dialect of English? If so, feel free to report it. I have only ever heard “broth” to refer to a liquid which is often made by cooking bones, and which is typically used as a basis for cooking more complicated soups or sauces,


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    “(Too) many cooks spoil the broth” is the English idiom that conveys the same meaning as Viele Köche verderben den Brei, regardless of the fact that “broth” is not the same as Brei.

    I see no reason to report anything.

    A bit like “a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush” = besser ein Spatz in der Hand als eine Taube auf dem Dach, even though “two (birds) in a bush” is not “a pigeon on a roof”.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
    Mod
    • 572

    Ah, fooled by idiomatic usage myself… Thanks for the correction.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Riskabarus

    I'm from Indonesia, we say "Too many hand on the soup will turn the taste bad". We believe the food is contaminated by the smell from the hands, even if you wash your hand before.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ali999516

    In persian we say آشپز اگه دوتا بشه یا غذا شور میشه یا بینمک


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GoldberryR

    Sto baba, kilava beba!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/senturkhakan

    In Turkish we say "Nerede çokluk, orada bokluk"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rosella99

    I've never heard this idiom in English….


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/proxima-centauri

    I think it depends on where you're from. I've seen a lot of mid/westerners that know it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meirgiler

    I don't know if there is such an idiom in english, i said that in "Hebrew we have this idiom


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kleskjr

    Many granies sore the baby!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Furkan202222

    Nerede cokluk orada b.kluk


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharafEddi6

    I cant understand hhhhhhh


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kandi976997

    Never heard that before


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skadillac

    to many brots spoil the cook?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amy918427

    This idiom section is too hard too fast.... Regret not picking the flirting add on.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin781297

    Why all the orange text? It's difficult to read!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zoeywillia3

    I was looking for that :D


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/botetta

    This just lets me know that I am far from being good a t German...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Odinson33

    I have another one: ''Give us back the quiz, instead of this''


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abed.nadir

    Ohhh maybe too many cooks will spoil the broth but they'll fill our heartsvwith so much loovvveeee!!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nateVONgreat

    i thought it was spelled "brough"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sara.Akhtaby

    why does it have to be "too many"... shouldn't "a lot" be accepted too.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsaiahGill1

    Is it just me or do these indirect translations really make it harder to learn. It seems like the direct translations make more sense.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChadTodd

    Why does duo lingo catch some typos and not others. Ugh.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ozgur.tunc

    Nerde çokluk orda bokluk.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mila946653

    Puno baba kilavo dite


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZakiAzizi2

    In persian we have the same saying!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/senturkhakan

    İn Turkish we say "Nerde çokluk orda bokluk"(slang)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeathToWhales

    Ahhh.fucking to vs too


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZoeyLopez1

    I cant say this crap

    Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.