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"La caramella"

Translation:The candy

January 14, 2013

92 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SoggyScroll

Why do people complain about the default American English being taught here? While I agree other non-American English words should be added as correct, it shouldn't be an outrage that American-created software uses American English. Cut them some slack. It's not a competition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2520

<sarcasm> How dare people who speak an American dialect not know anything about the New Zealand dialects! </sarcasm>


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartnRoque

The sound is terrible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raven_Whisper

sounded like it said "la caran"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dot844345

I heard "la Kara" and reported it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GScottOliver

Yep, the volume dropped so low after the first two syllables I had to turn my speakers up much too loud to hear the last two.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marygriffiths1

I agree regarding a recent lesson. Second syllable was absent


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JayDubbya1

yes guys - totally agree that the second syllable is so soft as to be missing-in-action ! But remember, there is a "report this" feature on the practice page. So please report this issue. That's how DUO goes from being SIMPLY GREAT to being SUPER SUPERB (by receiving feedback that helps DUO improve) !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doctorgabi

I think that both 'the sweet' and 'the sweets' should be correct, as in American English, the candy can be both singular and plural, yet in British English 'the sweet' is singular and 'the sweets' is plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lambertsimnel

The Italian "La caramella" is singular, though. I think "The sweets" would be "Le caramelle".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JVaugh

If la caramela, is candy, what is caramel then? :)))))))))))))))))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
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  • 2661

"Il caramello" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kristi123

Ive always heard italians call is "dulce" likes the word "sweet" for candy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lessyemma

I thought the same as well. I learned the word for candy as "dolce"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/imeldacook

I learned the word 'dolce' for 'sweet' which would be American 'candy'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/unicorngod

Dolce means sweet like the adjective. Caramella means sweet like the noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flaoxxx

Dolce e' un aggettivo, ma si usa anche per indicare il dessert di fine pasto. La caramella e' la caramella e basta, non e' sinonimo di dolce.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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@ Dot660277

Dolce e' un aggettivo, ma si usa anche per indicare il dessert di fine pasto. La caramella e' la caramella e basta, non e' sinonimo di dolce.

Dolce is an adjective, but it is also used to indicate the dessert at the end of the meal. Candy is just candy, it's not synonymous with sweet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dot844345

My Italian is not this good. What does that mean in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jude577369

It is OK for those who know that lollies or sweets are called candy, but not everyone is familiar with american. Cookie is another unfamiliar one i saw.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CDRR

Are candy, caramel, lolly and sweet the same thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kasiula77

not quite. a caramel is a TYPE of candy/lolly/sweet. in america, a lolly is also a specific type of candy (a lollipop)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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In the USA, "lolly" is perceived as a cute British abbreviation for "lollipop."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FlawyerLawyer

And "lolly" in Australia and New Zealand is any "sweets/candy".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shree426458

How can we know Where is use il nd where is la? Little bit confuse.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CateMelodyLaRose

a caramel is a type of candy. They should accept that translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
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  • 2661

I really should find a way to sticky this information since it's so hard to explain without pictures.

"Caramel" is technically this: Caramel

^ This is what's used for instance in crème caramel, and in Italian it's called "caramello": it's candy, but not "caramella".

In some countries bite sized toffees are sold as "caramels": Toffee

^ These in Italian are called "mou" (from the French for "soft" or "flabby") and are considered a specific type of "caramella". As Rae wrote, you can't consider it a general term for it.

This is what is normally thought of as "caramelle": Hard candy

Essentially, bite sized balls of sugar; it can be hard or soft, small mints or fruity gummy bears, but it must be made of sugar and you must be able to chew it whole.

The "candy" translation is misleading because so many things are considered "candy" in the US, including chocolates, and even the "sweets" translation includes e.g. lollipops, which are not considered "caramelle"; on the other hand "lolly" in Australia can in fact translate "caramella" as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2520

I don't think so. Think about it this way. Say you were asked to translate "the rectangle" and you tried to put "the square" on the logic that a square is a type of rectangle. You can't substitute a subset for a category.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sojournerbliss

Agree. That is a really good analogy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris646121

I put "the sweets" and I was wrong. Correct answer "the candy". #feelsbadtobefromUK


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2661

"The sweet" is accepted, you know. It's just not plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarunasP

Is there a correlation between "caramella" and "mella"? Or do they just seem related


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2661

"Mella" isn't a word in Italian: if you're thinking of the Italian "mela" (apple) then no, but if you're thinking of the Latin "mella" (water with honey) then maybe. One of the hypotheses is a Latin derivation from canna mellis (cane of honey, i.e. sugar cane), or a Late Latin one from calamellus (small reed or cane), but another compelling one is from the Arab (through Spain) kora (ball) + mochalla (sweet).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PamelaJohnson1

I put caramel which is correct in English as all candy is not caramel, although I agree that a caramel can be a candy (or a sweet if you are British).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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False friend. "La caramella" might look like "caramel", but the best translation is the broader "candy" and not the more specific "caramel".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beate813790

When do I use il and when Le or la?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Rules for the definite article:


https://i.imgur.com/aJ7Qlgb.jpg

Rules for the indefinite article:

Masculine

https://i.imgur.com/ioiRcSS.png

Feminine

https://i.imgur.com/7WZMfoO.png

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