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"Voulez-vous aller prendre un verre ?"

Translation:Would you like to go get a drink?

December 18, 2013

193 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MonsieurWest

I'm waiting to see "voulez-vous coucher avec moi ce soir"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AabLevellen

I know this is a very famous phrase. Still it is an odd one. The oddity is that you ask of a very intimate thing but in the formal vous address. It would be more natural to have come to address each other by tu befor asking this: Veux-tu coucher avec moi (ce soir) ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/industryfatcat

Assuming you're only talking to one person......


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lionelbrac1

Now that is interesting


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PapaSmurf88

Yeah. Because it's in the formal tense, it makes more sense that the user is talking to several people at once.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/La_Mariette

Also, wouldn't "cette nuit" be more logical??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

I think it is not necessary, but I could use “ce soir” rather than “cette nuit”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pythonenfrancais

Given the context of the characters singing that line (prostitutes), it really doesn't seem that odd. If a person were to say that trying to pick someone up at a bar, it would be very odd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TDudleyTot

Its for extra syllables so it sounds good to sing. Lyrics do stuff like this all the time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eesan2

It's sexier if you're trying to seduce someone who is not your peer. I think


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CalGousman

Thank you for teaching me this lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fest1nger

You might not see it here, as it is very explicit, and the site might have teenaged users, but since you know it you can use it :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smartfangirl

As a teenager i dont know what i was thinking when i bought this set! Im aro ace too so its like I'll ever use it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rosh_win26

Me too!!!!!!! Lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiveTheFaith

And those teenagers might see that comment lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TinyAnime

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiogoMenes7

What does it mean? I hate that the app doesn't let me copy paste :


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

You can copy and paste. « Voulez-vous aller prendre un verre ? » is “Do you want to go get a drink?” but they also accept “Would you like to go get a drink?”

« Voulez-vous coucher avec moi ce soir ? » is “Do you want to sleep with me tonight?”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gnasheroos

Yes, go away and get me a drink. You are now my loving.... SLAVE


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

This does not mean XxxDo you want me to get you a drink?xxX Instead, it asks if you want to go have a drink (with me).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xX_Abby_Xx1

im new to french can someone tell me what that means


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MilesKent

"Do you want to go get a drink"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StarryStreams

Personaly, i think it should be "go and get" not "go get"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jillhibberd

totally agree, go get is not good grammar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

It is not bad grammmar. It is similar to "can do" in that it uses a bare infinitive. This was originally "go to get", but it has evolved ( at least in America), so that the bare infinitive (without "to") is used now with a conjugated form of this particular verb "to go". These are not two separate activities. You go specifically for the purpose of getting something, so going facilitates getting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oliver571972

It is neither good nor bad. It is simply the American way. British speakers of English would always say "go and get" but would also recognise the American form as such, having been exposed to so much American dialogue on TV and in films.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Not in American English which used to be "go to get" but now we use the bare infinitive without the "to". These are not simultaneous activitities. One precedes and creates the opportunity for the other. It is not like eating and watching TV at the same time. If you don't do one of those you could still do the other, but when you go somewhere to do something we say "go do something."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

The word "danser" means "to dance", of course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sailor21

It's funny because here in italy VERRO means BOAR.. for a second I thought it meant " DO YOU WANT TO TAKE A BOAR?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arabella210259

Soo you're telling me you don't want to take a boar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

In case anyone is wondering, “boar” is “jabalí” in Spanish. https://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/Jabal%c3%ad

https://dizionario.reverso.net/inglese-italiano/Boar No, wait, “verro” is not the wild animal, just the male pig. So, “cerdo” is the word, but there is another word that is similar: “verraco”. https://dizionario.reverso.net/inglese-spagnolo/Boar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ltgomes

"Un verre" have the same meaning of "un boisson"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AabLevellen

Yes, it is a glass of a(n alcoholic) drink.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michaeltoneill

in this context yes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichelLemo932387

If you say "Voulez-vous aller prendre une boisson ?", she will run away!

"Une boisson" is not a very romantic word to flirt.

The best is to say : "Voulez-vous (or "veux-tu") aller prendre un verre".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christiane933067

Un verre? Oh yes!

Une boisson? Oh no!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duch-Sbana

une* boisson it's a feminine word ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinaLina462773

I thought the same thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DangerDaniel

Would you like to go to have a drink? Marked as wrong. Really??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kyattonyan

it did that to me too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TinyAnime

Because you guys said

"Would you like to go TO get a drink?"

Not="Would you like to go get a drink?"

Grammar is key in almost every language, especially English.... So ya


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimGaston

I answered "do you want a drink" which is something I've heard, and said, many times but lost a heart. I hate losing hearts!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LysiasAurelius

Personally, I think the English phrase would sound more natural as "Would you like to go AND get drink" (NZ English)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Sorry, they are close, but that wouldn’t need the verb “prendre”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tamlav

Is "allez" necessary here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

“Allez” is not used here which is the conjugated form of the infinitive: “aller” which is used here after the conjugated form “voulez”.
« Voulez-vous un verre ? » is “Do you want a drink?” which is not the same question as « Voulez-vous aller prendre un verre? » Here I am not just ready to hand someone a drink. I am asking if you want to go get a drink or go have a drink (with me). Shall we go?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ouphrontis

I said, would you like to grab a drink? Accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gerrywstill

I said "Would you like to get a drink?" Rejected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/momiji05

Same here. Since I am not a native English speaker. It's weird to me to say "to go get something". I have to learn more :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aussie3931

'Go get something' is poor English. You should say 'go and get something'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

What about "Let's go fly a kite!" ?

This is correct in American English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aussie3931

Yes it is. Sorry, I should have said 'poor English in the UK, Australia, New Zealand etc'. Julie Andrews must have been wincing when she recorded the sound track for that movie.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bendis.doma

I translated it as "would you go on a drink?" And it said it's not correct and it should be "would you to for a drink?" ... Like what? :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

You’re sure it wasn’t “Would you go for a drink?” which would be okay, but if it literally said “Would you to for a drink?” then you should report the accepted answer as wrong as that makes no sense at all. “Would you go on a drink?” makes no sense in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angela1

I had... 'Will you take a glass', this works in English though it's a bit old fashioned


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

The error should have been reported. “Will take” is the future tense, so it is constructed differently in French. « Prendrez-vous un verre ? ». This completely ignores the invitation to go.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shamus666

I got would you like to for a drink as well ... Lost in translation I guess


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

I guess even course contributors make typos. Did you report it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoiraSheph

Its not correct...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sue919013

I would never use the term "to go get a drink" whether flirting or not. I have never seen in a dictionary the verb 'to go get' identified. To be a go-getter yes, but that is rather different. 'Go and get' or 'go to get' would be better. In old black and white films you hear characters say. "Will you take a drink with me? I really hate having to to translate something into incorrect English in order to finish the lesson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

It is not incorrect American English to use the bare infinitive after “go”. We can say “go to do something” or “go and do something” or simply “go do something.” Why would you think two verbs are one? Of course, they will be listed separately. There are however a couple of examples listed that you might recognize: “Go jump in a lake!” “Let’s go fly a kite!”

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/go


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

"Go get" not really considered an acceptable form in British English. "Go AND get," or "go TO get" are more correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Did you try reporting those as British English alternatives? Be careful as it is not "more" correct, as this is correct American English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FelicitySpeed

Please please can we have go AND get a drink.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miaou-meow

(♡ω♡ )man i like this course! as a beginner i see soo many patterns that i can reveal and apply in other situations. the infinitives, some new vocabulary, the order in the sentences.. it's a pure gem!✧


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HonorPhill

Technically, the good English translation would be, 'Would you like to go and get a drink?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

That is only one possible way to put it, but it uses another verb tense also available in French and even different verbs. “Aimeriez-vous aller chercher un verre?” It is not commonly said this way in French though, so you could try reporting it as an alternative for this common sentence, but I wouldn’t say that it is technically a good translation. Technically, it is rather different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brandyngabel

I reported this because it said that the correct answer was "Want to for a drink?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Thank you for reporting this!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

Why not Would you like to go to take a drink??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AshtonHynes

Though it is the direct translation, "Would you like to go to take a drink?" would never be said naturally in English. The English version they gave isn't exactly the direct translation of the English phrase, but it is the common english equivalent


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

Thank you for that. I'll remember it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/craxmen

My translation "Do you want to go having a drink" (Pretty direct translation, I know) was corrected to "Do you want to go have a drink" I'm not a native in the English languge, but the latter one sounds really odd to me. Shouldn't you use a gerund here? Am I wrong or is DuoLingo wrong or is both right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laCommunarde

The correct English construction is "go have" because go is irregular in its construction. The construction is go + present tense verb (it can also be done - "go to have" or "go and have" but the to or and is dropped most times). Dropping the to doesn't work for "he goes." For that, you need "he goes to have" or "he goes and has."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Technically “ have” in “ go have” is not the present tense verb, but what they call the “bare infinitive” which is “to have” stripped of its “to”.

Also, “having” is certainly not a direct translation of a French infinitive. We would not use a gerund there in English as a gerund is used as a noun. You can go to a place or you can go to do something which in turn is usually expressed as “go do something.” and could also be expressed as “go and do something.”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jillhibberd

Go and do is what we were taught in English grammar in UK, obviously a lot of American is different after hundreds of years change!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

The structure to go have, to go get is more likely, I think, in American English. In British English you would be more likely to hear to go and have, to go and get, though with younger speakers you can find the two verbs together. Or, more simply, "Do you fancy (getting) a drink?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/123grace17

y would u ask this? not everyone drinks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Everyone drinks, though not everyone drinks alcohol. I might tell someone that I could go for a smoothie. Another person might redirect to go for a coffee.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lizzy090908

I like your profile pic:-) 123grace17


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iggy.malik

i feel like he should have said grab a drink


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Someone above said that was accepted, but that completely ignores the invitation to go.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MilesKent

It's odd that it isn't "boisson"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

“Un boisson” is any drink, not necessarily alcoholic. In English, we would say “a drink”. That is our expression, but you shouldn’t be surprised that they use a different expression in a different language. You cannot translate word for word. Often you must translate expression for expression.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oliverio506152

Also more commenly in England. "Would you like to go for a drink."

Wow duolinguo you can be polite.. It is the first time you use "would like"

I was expecting:

Do you want to get a drink? haha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vangard123

this is so polite but if somebody approched me i would probably say go away XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Indoh

My remark is not about this particular sentence, but about the whole exercise: it repeats exactly the same things two times!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SparklyYimYam

Not good English. It should be "go FOR a drink" surely?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Araadegbe

Thank you very much now I understand better


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/La_Mariette

"Voulez-vous" = Do you want, "aller" = to go, "prendre" = to take, "un verre" = a glass. Literally: Do you want to go take a glass? It's an idiomatic expression.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikeywrieyes

Puis-je dire «Veux-tu aller prendre un verre?» Si pas, pourquoi?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

It makes perfectly good sense if you had the exercise to translate from English to French, but don’t forget that French requires spacing around two part punctuation marks. «  Veux-tu aller prendre un verre ? ». If you are asking someone that you don’t know that well yet, then you might want to use the formal version above though and that person will tell you if they don’t mind you using the informal version that you would use with friends and family.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laCommunarde

The translation to English is broken. "Voulez-vous" is "do you want". "Would" is conditional. And it already marked should as wrong in a past exercise because it's conditional.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Here we are translating one common French expression into the common English expression and each language has a different preference. “Would” is often used to add a layer of politeness in English and in French “vous” already has a layer of politeness.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

“Do you want to go...” “want” is conjugated and “to go” is in infinitive form. What is your question? “I want to go....”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frogmas

Could one also say "Voudriez-vous prendre un verre ?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

You could, but keep in mind that « Voulez-vous prendre un verre ? » is just the common way to say it in French. We say “Would you...” and that creates a more polite invitation, but they use “vous” which already makes it more formal than “tu” so they don’t have to do more.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orionavander

I said "do you feel like having a drink", (got it wrong) and I feel like that's maybe even closer to a literal translation than the correct solutions. Am I off?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Yes. I could answer yes to your question and still not go with you to get a drink. “Do you feel like having a drink?” would be  « Avez-vous envie de prendre un verre ? »


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnastasiaLange89

I said: "Would you go get a drink?" :-/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

That sounds like I want the person to go get a drink for me or just go get one for yourself, but this is an invitation to go somewhere with me to get a drink. It is almost the opposite since I am inviting you and will probably pay for the drink. You cannot omit “like” or “want” and the verb “to go” is in infinitive form on purpose after that. “Do you want to go get a drink?” or “Would you like to go get a drink?”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abdelhamee356913

I wrote: would you like to get a drink ? ( accepted ) .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sally410

English varies in different regions. "Would you like to go for a drink (with me)?" would be usual here. The above could be interpreted here as saying "would you like to go and get yourself a drink?". So, this is a US - UK English thing and rather charming.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

DId you try it? You could report it as correct if it was not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FlorinPuiu

Prendre un verre = get a glass. Why is Duo translating "verre" with "drink"? The French question should have been" Voulez-vous aller prendre un boisson", n'est ce pas ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lillian873428

I got: - Do you want 1 drink? - Would you like to go get a drink?

Does this mean offering a drink or making someone buy you a drink or both?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

This is an invitation to go and get a drink together. “Do you want 1 drink?” should be reported as wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/srh1056

I said "can I buy you a drink?" (It was marked wrong.) I've never been invited to go have a drink and be expected to pay for it myself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

It is just that it would be rude in French to use “buy”. You are completely skipping the part about “going with me to get a drink”. Naturally I will pay for the drink, but now I am simply asking if the person will go with me. “Can I buy you a drink?” sounds like I will buy the drink here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Su51M

i noticed that almost all phrases use the formal vous form instead of tu. is that normal when flirting in french? or is it just because it's more polite to say vous?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

It is more polite to say “vous” and the person can always tell you that you can use “tu”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yosra_uc

why isn't " voulez- vous allez ..............??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

“voulez” is already conjugated so the rest of the verbs will be in infinitive form.

We do the same in English “want” is conjugated so it is “to go” then we vary it with a bare infinitive (without “to”) “get”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

It works in American English. Did you try the British form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaptainSeaweed

The translation I got was " Would you like to grab 1 drink?" C'est etrange en anglais, non?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Yes, that is a bit strange, but the programming will allow “1” for “un” in case you do mean “one” instead of “a”. It also ignores the invitation to go...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OgbonnaPau

I think it should be "allez" not aller


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

No, the conjugated verb is “voulez” and there is only one conjugated verb without a conjunction. After “voulez”, you would put an infinitive. It is the same in English. “Do you want to go...?”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leahnpayne

i can mostly guess what it says just by the words im given


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christian6853

In English, I prefer "Would you like to go for a drink"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

That would be different in French. You could try “Would you like to go have a drink?”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/La_Mariette

One would usually use "tu" in this context, though, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

That depends if you are asking someone you already know. “Vous” is more polite if it is someone you don’t know yet and if the person agrees that person may suggest using “tu”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raypab

verre is Glass tasse is cup drink is boisson


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/La_Mariette

This is true, but French people don't ask each other to "go for a drink", they ask each other to "take a glass" with them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nansell

"go get"is god awful English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oliverio506152

Irony. In the 1980's in England young men were very grude and used it in pubs as they were drunk and didn't know how to speak to girls.

Also, for an english person to ask a french person. Remember if it is a chat up line you opviously don't know the french person you are asking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stars17

Would this also translate the same without aller? Like if I said "Voulez-vous prendre un verre?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

That would be different, because you would have the drink here, instead of going somewhere else for it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dolores_

very bad english grammer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

No, this is common in American English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/B.Myall

Would you like to go get a drink? = correct in the USA, not Britain. Here one would say Would you like to go and get a drink?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cerealsoup-

boy:would you like to go get a drink of alcohol? girl:oh yes PRINCE CHAR CHAR! I WILL DO ANY THING FOR YOU!!!!!!! I WILL GO JUMP OF A CLIF AND DIE FOR YOU EVEN THO I NOT GOING TO BE ABLE TO BE WITH YOU IF I DIE. I WILL SEE YOU IN HEVEN CHAR CHAR!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LysiasAurelius

Personally I think the English phrase would sound more natural as "Would you like to go AND get a drink" (NZ English)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LysiasAurelius

Personally, I think the English phrase would sound more natural as "Would you like to go AND get drink" (NZ English)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LysiasAurelius

Personally, I think the English phrase would sound more natural as "Would you like to go AND get drink" (NZ English)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carol252291

Go get? Strange arrangement of words


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carol252291

.....Go and get a drink...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amin.afsahi

It's better to separate the two English verbs by and or comma.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Not in American English, but “ go and ...” would be used in British English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/La_Mariette

"Go (and) drink" does not mean exactly the same thing as "go, drink".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tiny_avacado

It should be: "Would you like to get and get a drink?" because "go get" doesn't make as much sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

It makes sense in American English which this course is taught from.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fan251
  • 1438

Please don't use this sentence "prendre un verre", unless you just want to be her friend !!!! If you want to invite her to go out as her man, you have to use this sentence "Je te propose de voir un verre " or "Je vous propose de voir un verre". Ask any French men or women about it ? It is very serious matter !!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uhdollie

No thanks sorry, I don't date people called Duolingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ava743033

It said I had a typo though I couldn't have, given that you don't type it, you click the words... Idk


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elliott543308

Why are the Questions REPEATING ALL THE TIME


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnastasiaLange89

This is how you learn - through repetition. If you are bored, start the other subject. Then come back to finish the old one in a week to see if you remember it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LingotLover1

These are the last words the parrots from the Latin corse heard.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smartfangirl

But im underaged


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aussie3931

Would you like to go and get a drink.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Go where? In American English, it feels as though you are separating these into two separate activities. as if "I am going shopping and then I am getting a drink."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aussie3931

Would you like to go AND get a drink?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Do not put "and" in your answer to pass this sentence, though report it as also correct for UK.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WJisNaBH

What if I am speaking to on person


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

"Vous" is the polite formal singular you as well as the plural form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaymaCanu

This whole section is cringe worthy! Really, don't use any of it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lin536191

in UK English it would be "Would you like to go AND get a drink


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Did you report it as also correct for UK?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/..Ladybug..

Asked the same question 3 times in a row. What is this NONSENSE!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrSBenson

This needs "and" if any resemblance to correct grammar is to be achieved. i.e. Would you like to go AND get a drink?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Correct grammar in UK, but not in USA; just report it as also correct if it is not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RuthCrawfo6

It's badly translated to English. Better is: Would you like to go for a drink?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Did you try to report it as also correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kangankhanke

This should be translated as 'Do you want to go get a drink?' The translation Duo has given would be for 'Voudrais-vous aller prendre un verre?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

"Vous" is a polite form, but in English "do you want" is not pollite, so it is changed to " would you like..." which would have been literally "Voudriez- vous aimer aller prendre un verre?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nansell

Go get is crap English. It should be go AND get


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

British English and American English have some differences which aren't necessarily bad. So, go fly a kite! Some people might tell you to "Go jump in a lake!" Over time some words don't use "and", I am sure you are used to modal verbs, but here we also say "Help me find this." as well, using the bare infinitive without "to". Please delete the copy of your comment below.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nansell

"go get" is crap, lazy English. It should be "go AND get"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OlegLilitk

Bad owl! Alcohol has nothing to do with flirting. I'm really disappointed in you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

So, what about a lemonade or smoothie then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/speedy1

Where did 'like' come from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

"Would you like" is simply a politer expression used for "Do you want", the French is using "vous" which makes it more polite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterBrown574686

'Go and get a drink' in UK English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Except that is imperative, while this is a polite question...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Monique167096

go get is very informal and the translation is a bit confusing, i would change it to: would you like to go and get a drink? Or: would you like to go to get a drink? Also in English when you invite you'd rather say: have a drink not get a drink


[deactivated user]

    This sentence is more of a casual phrase.... not really a flirty one


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

    It is probably all in the delivery. Some people also don't drink with just anyone.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisB-UK

    UK - go and get or just go for a drink - never go get a drink


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/njmathis

    Can not hear pronuncation of Prendre

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