https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty

Crockpots - Popular in the US. Do people use them in other countries?

jolynnedougherty
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Crockpots or slow-cookers - those appliances that you fill with raw ingredients in the morning, turn them on, and have a hot meal waiting for you at the end of the day when you get home from work, school, church, etc. Very popular in the US now, but I can't imagine the French doing it to their food. But maybe they do. How about up north in Canada, do you guys cook in a Crockpot? Do people from other countries use Crockpots? Just to keep it language related, what is the word for a Crockpot/slow-cooker in your language?

2 years ago

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Dcarl1
Dcarl1
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I think most other countries just do it old school: a Dutch oven and a low flame.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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My (mostly from Mexico) ESL students all seem to own and use crockpots. They also use blenders A LOT more than I do. They're great for making things like posole (a pork and hominy stew), birria (a beef stew dish and menudo (tripe soup, which I personally don't like. However, it's really popular for Sunday morning - it's supposed to fight hangovers.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hivemindx
hivemindx
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In French this seems to be a "mijoteur" or "mijoteuse" which is probably a made up word based on "mijoter" the verb to simmer or stew.

I found this out by going to amazon.com and looking up crock pots so I knew what the term referred to and them to amazon.fr and searching for the same devices (which was easy because they came up when I searched for "crock pot", but I could have tried various different terms until I found the correct devices). I can see the exact same things as on the US page but they are called either "mijoteur" or "mijoteuse", seemingly randomly.

I then went to wordreference.com to see what they had for "mijoteur" which was nothing, but they did have "mijoter". When you know that "eur/euse" is the ending often used to indicate a person or thing that does the thing indicated by the stem of the word (eg: "fumer" is to smoke, "fumeur" is a smoker) it's obvious that "mijoteur" means simmerer, stewer or (since they sound awful in English) slow-cooker.

This method of finding out real-world terms for things works pretty well, especially for things where you are not convinced the dictionary is giving you an up to date or popular translation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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There seems to be a precedent for mijoteuse (électrique).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sueefo

"Crockpot" has become a generic word for "slow-cooker" in the U.S. It is actually a brand name, made by Rival. On mine it says "Crockpot" and underneath it says "The Original Slow-Cooker." My mom had the original round Crockpot in the 1970s. It was avocado-green–such a 70s color! We had many good meals from it. As noted, slow-cookers are more powerful so it's difficult to use those old recipes in the newer models. By old recipes I mean the ones which instruct you to cook boneless-skinless chicken breasts on high for 8 hours. This leaves you with the paradox of dry-as-a-bone chicken swimming in sauce. Recipes for slow-cookers have changed too. There are many good cookbooks with recipes to make from scratch-no canned condensed soup here. But I admit that I like my mom's recipe for pork chops with canned chicken rice soup. The chops fell off the bone and were tender and the soup was a nice complement. People tend to turn up their noses at such homey cooking. Not me! I just made myself hungry.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A_User
A_User
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I use one! It's one of my best friends in the kitchen for when I'll be out all day and we want a hot meal in the evening. :-) But my best best friend (other than the oven, the stove, the refrigerator, the freezer, the mixer, etc.) is the pressure cooker. :-)

Mine looks rather like this.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
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Not just in the southern parts of the UK either, up here in Scotland we use them too. And now pressure cookers, which can do more or less the same things but can be much faster if you want them to.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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(I’m replying here because the post which I’m actually replying to doesn’t have a Reply link.)

My guess is that the “rectangular” model that jolynnedougherty referred to below is actually elliptical, like the one in A_User’s picture above.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
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Yes, exactly what I have. It looks like it's even the same brand. I would never think of that as "rectangular" though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sueefo

Mine looks like that too except mine is digital.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luscinda
Luscinda
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Slow cookers have been enjoying a bit of a revival here and they seem to be all over the shops in Germany.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AureliaUK
AureliaUK
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It may have something to do with the rediscovery, in the UK at least, of the old fashioned, cheaper cuts of meat, especially beef, that really do need long, slow cooking.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucBE
LucBE
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I thought they weren't used in Belgium, but I actually have seen them in the shops. They're being marketed as tabletop ovens, however (the round glass ones). Unless I'm not yet clear about the exact nature of them...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Yes, slow cookers are essentially low-temperature countertop ovens.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mirifis
Mirifis
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I am french. There are some meals (especially meat meals) that are cooked for several hours like this. My boyfriend let the veal meat with mushrooms, carrots and cream (for those who know - blanquette de veau) all night long (the process is called: laisser mijoter). At the end the meat is delicious and very tender, you don't even need a knife to cut it. The tool we use is a metal pot with a glass lid that has a little hole to let the steam escape. Its name in french is a faitout (a "does everything"). There is no innovation nor electronics in it. We put it on the oven on a very low flame and that's it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elagui
Elagui
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Curious question. I know that my favorite country has been trying to push people to buy and use appliances like ovens, dish washers, clothes washers, and dryers - before their power infrastructure was less than reliable but it's had some significant improvement. I just don't know if they'd think it a good idea to turn the power on, leave it unused most of the day while they're elsewhere, and come back to a meal. It would be like us leaving the t.v. on all day long while we're not at home. Also, they might not usually make the sorts of meals that require slow-cookers.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dcarl1
Dcarl1
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I love my rice cooker for this reason: I come home and the rice is done. It draws very little power.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elagui
Elagui
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We recently discovered the rice cooker / vegetable steamer combo - it's revolutionized our menu with deliciously healthy food.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty
jolynnedougherty
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I was talking to my sister about this. She suggested that a rice cooker or a bean pot might be used more often in the same way a slow cooker is. My roommate from the Philippines had her rice cooker on all the time and used rice for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dcarl1
Dcarl1
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For about a decade I ate Indian or Thai food for 3 meals a day and the rice cooker was always on. Now I use it 4-5 times a week.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty
jolynnedougherty
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If you don't mind my asking, Elagui, what country are you from?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elagui
Elagui
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The states, however I was referring to Ecuador. They do have a lot of soups and stews - locro, encebollado, fanesca, etc. but there are foods like ceviche that don't require the use of slow cookers. You can learn more about their cuisine here: http://visit.ecuador.travel/culinario/site/es/
At the bottom of the page you can download a few recipe books if you're feeling adventurous.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty
jolynnedougherty
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Thanks.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/G6In3D
G6In3D
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I dislike slow-cookers, they give food a rather dry taste.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dcarl1
Dcarl1
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Me too. My mom had one in the 70s, but I've never owned one. I just use cast iron.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CozyTarts

Do you add water or broth? My chicken comes out falling apart tender, and delicious!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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At least in the US, newer slow cookers are manufactured to operate at higher temperatures than older slow cookers were; if you have a newer slow cooker, you’ll probably need to reduce your recipes’ cooking times to compensate. (I don’t know if this change only happened for slow cookers on the US market, or if they were changed for all markets worldwide.)

To find out if yours is a newer, hotter one, you could try this:

  • Put two US quarts (1.9 liters) of water in your slow cooker;
  • Put the cover on and let it operate on the “low” setting for eight hours;
  • Lift the lid, and check the water’s temperature: if it’s above 185 °F (85 °C), then you have a newer, hotter slow cooker, and you’ll need to adjust your recipes’ cooking times.
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty
jolynnedougherty
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I love that you know this, but why do you know this bit of randomness and in such detail?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Because at times I cook with a slow cooker (tonight’s main course is in a slow cooker [an older one] as I type this), and if something goes wrong with a particular recipe, I like to figure out if there’s something that I can do for the next time that I try preparing it. If in the process of trying to figure out what went wrong I find random bits of information that didn’t apply in my case, but which might be of use to other people with a similar problem, I set that information aside, so that it can be offered as a possible solution to other people for whom it might be relevant.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty
jolynnedougherty
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Now I am really curious. I have a rectangular slow cooker that I got as a wedding present almost 20 years ago and a new Crock Pot that I bought in November. I'm going to have to check the temperatures. They both work well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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I’d expect your rectangular one to cook at a “traditional” temperature and your new one to cook at a hotter temperature. (I’d guess that the manufacturing change probably took place between five and ten years ago.) If your new one has a temperature that’s similar to your rectangular one, please note the new one’s manufacturer and model number in a reply here.

Regarding your original language-related request, the Irish for “slow cooker” is a literal translation from English — cócaireán mall.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
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Rectangular slow cookers, unlike crock pots, I think are not used in Britain. Because I had no idea that such a thing existed.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty
jolynnedougherty
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Are you in the US or in a different country?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/G6In3D
G6In3D
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U.S.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaycat1234

Although I don't actually know about Italy or Spain, I can tell you about England. We call them slow-cookers, and they're relatively common from what I've seen, although they're not used constantly. It's more like when you have some beef and vegetables in gravy, and you want to slowly cook it so the meat is really soft and full of flavour.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucBE
LucBE
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I'm Belgian. I have never used or even seen a crockpot or a slow cooker. I don't believe I know anyone who uses them.
But Belgian cuisine is heavily French influenced.

Are they healthy? I would think bacteria love them!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty
jolynnedougherty
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No, because it is like an oven. You put the food into the ceramic crock, cover with the lid and cook. It boils. Then you put the leftovers in the fridge.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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It looks like a Dutch multicooker is a deluxe slow cooker:

The ones sold in the US typically only have “off”, “low”, and “high” (and sometimes “warm”) settings, like the €25,00 Quigg mijoteuse at the second link above.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucBE
LucBE
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Thanks!
One of these is actually a tajine. Apparently, the North-African tajine is used much the same way as a slow-cooker. The difference is of course that it is heated above charcoal in stead of with electricity.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gingerninja3148

I live in Australia and my mum has one and often uses it. We never call them crockpots though, only slow-cookers. I don't think they are extremely popular here but a fair amount of people have them.

2 years ago
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