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https://www.duolingo.com/shukladhaivat17

Indian Languages : Sanskrit (संस्कृत) ....... Topic 3

Namaste All :)

Until this Topic, I have mentioned the History of Sanskrit language and Advantages of learning the Divine tongue. Until today, I did not think to go ahead of that point anymore.

If you have missed the TOPIC 1 and 2, you can goto below links :

Topic 1. https://www.duolingo.com/comment/12823863

Topic 2. https://www.duolingo.com/comment/12974531

It would certainly be a Marathon run for my Keyboard to type a loooong loooooooooooooooooong explanations on Grammatical rules and regulations of learning the Devanagari Script (Whoa now whats that?) and then after Learning the Sanskrit (or Hindi)…… Well, I beg pardon . I do NOT want to see your Yawny face. :)

Mṛ Duo is starting to teach Hindi (And may be Sanskrit after that, I hope) language in upcoming months of 2016. But my focus is much more on Learning and proudly watching the whole world (High Hopes :D) learning the Divine Language Sanskrit, that have not yet put in the TO BE LEARNING list of Duolingo . So, I can not wait more for the Sanskrit – English course. And I would rather contribute my tiny efforts to give this extremely beautiful language her lost importance in the world. Hope, one day Duolingo starts this course… BUT BUT BUT, until that day, my tries are going on and on and oṇ…. :)

The only thing that I can promise you by this Discussion that you will not feel bored anymore (Yes, because “I do NOT want to see your Yawny face. – I like CTRL+C and CTRL+V :)”). I mentioned the TWO words, Devanagari Script in above paragraph . What is that? Well, Indian languages (Especially Sanskrit and Hindi) are different in writing, reading and pronouncing the letters (Vowels and Consonants). I know, I know, what you will now say.. Each and every language in the world is so unique that it differs in their aspects ... If so, have you noticed? When comes to WRITING and READING, what is the difference in English, Spanish and Portuguese? You are FREE to add more in this list . Yes, I forgot to mention, temporarily throw out the “accents” in the deepest well in the world for a moment .. :)

So, if someone wants to learn Hindi or Sanskrit, he/she MUST be aware of Devanagari Script which is very interesting to study and also Easy… :) :)

Now, take a look at back-to-back below given two figures. You can visualize the Vowel table in the 1st fig. and Consonant table in the 2nd fig.

Vowels

Consonants

Mṛ Vowel

Let’s have a through look in the first figure. The table given here points the finger (You are free to select any finger of your choice) at someone called Vowel (स्वर – Ggl Inp : swar) . How many could you see there? Well, I could see 12 Vowels . They are complete in themselves and do not require the help of another letter to be pronounced. SELF RESPECTING you know!!! B-) B-)

Mr Consonant

The Consonants (व्यंजन – Ggl Inp : vyanjan) on the other hand (See 2nd fig.), are incomplete. They can be pronounced only with the help of a SWAR . Yes, you are right . with the help of a VOWEL. There are NOT lesser than 33 in Devanagari Script . :)

NOTE : Could you see the English pronunciation of each and every Vowel and Consonant, given just below the particular Vowel or Consonant in the figure? Forget the vertical-horizontal-zigzag line given below the Vowels (YES BUT ONLY TEMPORARY, as they have a vital role in the Devanagari) … :)

If you are eager to know, how these Vowels and Consonants sound, Here is the link. http://www.chitrapurmath.net/sanskrit/Varnamala/varnamala.htm . You can get the sound for particular letter here. Have a deeper look and you will get that basic idea, for sure (FYI : Number of Vowels given there is 16 (Not 12) and Number of Consonants is 35 (Not 33)… Because those few letters may have been obsolete now due to removal of them from learning curriculum or due to their lesser usage, may be those letter belonged to the Vedic Era (3000 years ago) and were used only in the verses or chanting or any other reason Blah... Blah… Blah…) … :)

I think, that is enough for today’ s topic…. We will learning few more things about the Devanagari in our next Lessons . Until then ….. Have a Great Time …. :) :) :)

Link for the Topic Number 4 is here. https://www.duolingo.com/comment/13008679

2 years ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/gatonijua
gatonijua
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I'd love to have a Sanskrit course on Duolingo really, but I think we'll probably get it after Hindi and Tamil. My question: do all indian students learn sanskrit?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vinaysaini
vinaysaini
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I am tongue tied on this question. In our school days, we were taught Sanskrit as a subject up to 8th Std. From 9th Std., it is optional. I would say few persons choose it as a subject over other options.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shukladhaivat17

Well, before answering your beautiful question, Let me tell you a short story....

A man ABC lives in a beautiful village. He owns a cow. The cow is very healthy and gives a lot of milk with the purest quality, everyday. The man loves the taste of the milk given by that "Divine" cow... :)

Then something happens one day. Another man DEF from another village (In fact I should prefer to call CITY here) comes to stay in this village. In fact he becomes the neighbor of ABC. And point to be noted that, He also owns a Cow. Yeahh! :)

What happens now is fairly interesting (With a NEGATIVE point of view). Let me ask you a question . Imagine your most favorite fooḍ. Now, goto the nearest restaurant everyday (Well, if you can afford the travelling costs, you are free to goto the far away restaurants as well :) ...) and enjoy the same fav. food everyday for a montḥ. Initially, you will lick your fingers with a so much delicious smile on your face. But as the day passes, see after 10 dayṣ 20 days and so on, you will feel SATISFIED (In a mean language, LITERALLY TIRED) from the food. So, what that means? The sweetness of that food is lost? No waaaayyṣ. It is still that deliciouṣ . But it is you who is enjoying it for loooooong 30 days, so you will NATURALLY feel tired of having it for the 31st day.

Likewise, that man ABC once enjoyed the milk of DEF' s cow, and then gradually stopped having his own cow' s milk, and the next stage, gradually ignoring his own cow, stopped feeding heṛ.

POSSIBLE OUTCOME : That beautiful, healthy and "Divine" cow of ABC starts getting weaken day after day. The man, knowing all everything that his cow is each and everyday putting a long step towards the DEATH and still he avoids and avoids heṛ....

Today, that cow called Sanskrit is at the shameful stage (shameful for most Indian people for ignoring its beauty) of Death . She is counting the last days of her over 5000+ years loooooooong life. That guy ABC is a common Indian of today, DEF is the Foreign Invasion (Especially a British), that beautiful village is India and that another village (modern city, in my view) is Britain (And each and every country who invaded India) ......

Sorry for the long message above, but it was much needed for me to explain the point, not only to you but to all who read these message.

You had a question Do all Indian students learn Sanskrit? Your answer is hidden in above paragraphs . And that is NO . just because of an invasion of foreigners on India, and likewise invasion of foreign languages on local languages, the forthcoming Indian generation went flattered with English, French, Portuguese etc. I CERTAINLY DO NOT MEAN THAT THESE LANGUAGES ARE WORST OR VILLAIN, but "The Truth is Truth, and no one can change it".... Hardly 1 in 20 students learns this extremely beautiful language Sanskrit, And I salute that each unique 1 in every 20... If we Indians will not do something for our mother Sanskrit, then who else will be? :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/remoonline
remoonline
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There is no language subject that's common to all Indian students (except maybe English, though the quality of instruction varies considerably).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vinaysaini
vinaysaini
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बहुत अच्छा, श्रीमान शुक्ल जी

लेकिन आप मुझे बताइए, कैसे किसी अंग्रेजी व्यक्ति को देवनागरी सीखनी चाहिए। मैंने बहुत तलाश की, और पाया की समय-समय पर बहुत सारी लिप्यंतरण योजना बनी हैं, लेकिन कोई भी सार्वभौमिक मानक के तौर पर स्वीकार की गई जैसे की चीनी भाषा के लिए सार्वभौमिक मानक पिन्यिन (Pinyin) उपलब्ध है।

हालांकि यूनिकोड और गूगल इनपुट जैसे टूल्स आ जाने के बाद हिन्दी भाषियों के लिए हिन्दी मे टंकण करना बहुत आसान हो गया है क्योंकि ये सन्निकट (approximate) keypresses पर ही निकटतम शुद्ध शब्द सुझा देते हैं। लेकिन एक अंग्रेजी भाषी के लिए जिसको अभी देवनागरी का ज्ञान ही नहीं है, प्राथमिक स्तर पर देवनागरी सीखने के लिए क्या ये आधुनिक टूल्स मददगार होंगे ?

Very well, Mr. Shukla Ji,

However, please tell me, how an English person should learn Devanaagari. I searched a lot and found that many transliteration schemes have been developed from time to time, but none of them have been accepted as universal standard in the same way as 'Pinyin' is available for Mandarin Chinese.

Though after the advent of Unicode and the tools like Google Input, typing in Hindi has been made very easy for natives because they instantly suggests nearest correct words on just some approximate keypresses. But what about an English person who has yet not been initiated into Devanaagari, will these modern tools are suffeciently helpful to teach them Devanaagari at primary levels?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shukladhaivat17

Yes, these modern tools are sufficiently helpful in learning Devanagari, I think.... Thank you for the comment :)

2 years ago