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"Do you believe me?"

Translation:An gcreideann tú mé?

2 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/silmeth
silmeth
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As I wrote in another thread about this sentence I believe that an gcreideann tú uaim would be better, according to usage examples in FGB.

Those examples suggest that creid with direct object means to believe that the direct object is a true sentence, and that one would use creid ó dhuine éigin to say to believe somebody.

But, as a learner, I would be glad to see an explanation by somebody more experienced with the language. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gufcfan
gufcfan
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Native speaker here. "An gcreideann tú uaim" is not correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnLonDubhBeag

I have heard it several times in Corca Dhuibhne to mean, "Do you believe what I am saying?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silmeth
silmeth
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OK, thank you. :) So the examples led me to wrong conclusion.

Is then creid uaim [é] the only phrase where creid ó + sb appears? Would something like Creidim uait also be wrong (and creidim tú be correct)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Looking at the “give credence to” examples in the FGB (1977) with ó,

  • Creid uaim gur fíor é (“Believe me, it is true“)
  • Creid uaimse é (“You may take it from me”)
  • Ní chreidfinn an lá geal uaidh (“I wouldn’t believe anything he might say”)

and a similar example from the English-Irish Phrase Dictionary (1922, so pre-reform spellings),

  • {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}Ní ċreidim uait gur ḋeinis é (“I do not believe you when you say you did it”)

and a quote of Keating (17th century) in Dinneen’s dictionary (1904),

  • {@style=font-family: 'Bunchlo Arsa GC', 'BunchloArsaGC', serif; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 12pt}an tí … ċreideas do’n tí do ċuir uaiḋ mé (“he who … believes in him who sent me”)

I wonder if it’s an older idiom that has survived only in Munster Irish?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnLonDubhBeag

I have heard it in Munster

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silmeth
silmeth
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Perhaps it would be a good topic for a Daltaí na Gaeilge or Unilang discussion. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

The example that you're quoting from the FGB is an example of the imperative, but the NEID entry for creid uaimse é shows that there's also a pleading quality to it - "believe you me", "I'm telling you". The FGB version "Take it from me" might be the best translation. I don't think it's a good guide for questioning this translation, which is also supported by the NEID entry níor chreid sí mé - "she didn't believe me".

2 years ago