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"¿Me das tu número?"

Translation:Can I get your phone number?

4 years ago

202 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Arpechal
Arpechal
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This sentence means "Do you give my your number?" "Can I get.." would be "Me puedes dar...".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatrinaMac4

It's idiomatic

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martind611973

And idiomagic

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Coopsters1

Idioms is even more idomagical

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gg479
gg479
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and idiot

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rianna383003

Thats not kind.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usamonas
Usamonas
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9gagger spoted

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

“¿Me puedes dar?" is “Can you give me?" or “Are you able to give me?" This sentence may decode to “You give me your number?" if you make the mistake of using word for word substitution (usually wrong) instead of translating for meaning.

You can split the difference and say, “Will you give me your number?" if it makes you more comfortable, but I think the point was to phrase it the way people are used to communicating.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KororiaInn

omg guys hahaha this is really helpful

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Flashbolt13

call me never ! XD

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KwameKN
KwameKN
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Thanks for the very helpful tip mate/ friend

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr_eXquire

When I typed "Do you give me your number?" it was marked as a mistake...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clnoy
clnoy
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First, your sentence is incorrect in english. You should use "give me your number" instead of "give my...".

Second, the expression here is idiomatic and never translates as "do you give me your number".

The expression here is an interrogative imperative. It's like the affirmative imperative but with the inversion in pronouns.

  • Dame tu número. Give me your number. Command, order (orden)
  • ¿Me das tu número? Can you give me your number? Wish, question (pedido)
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christa490640

Cláudio is right.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ecaterinamaria

I agree with you

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nay825366

That really help, thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LonnieLon

lxkhugvudfioghtwjp4ih

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elianah12

What

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DroppedBass
DroppedBass
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"¿Me das tu número?" is also a way to ask for something.

There are several variants for asking something in an informal setting, for example:

"Dame tu número": An order, it is considered rude unless the context justifies it.

"¿Me das tu número?": A bit rude and pushy way to ask for something.

"¿Me darías tu número?": Similar to the previous one, but it is more humble, with a lesser expectation the response will be more positive.

"¿Me puedes dar tu número?": Neutral way to ask someone close to you (friend, family member, etc.) for something.

"¿Me podrías dar tu número?": Polite way to ask someone close to you for something.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chantal646972

Did you use Google translate ? If you did it is sometimes incorrect . Spanish has its rules

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elllespo

Isn't it more like "Me do you give your number?"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Coopsters1

Yes, but Spanish doesnt translate exactly translate to English in many cases. You just need to learn those cases.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ManioloBognero

why not: do you give me your number?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

“Do you give me your number?" doesn't make sense to English speakers. If you want to translate as directly as possible while still making sense, how about, “Will you give me your number?"

However, this leaves the door open for a smart aleck to reply “yes" and walk away without giving it to you (they can give it to you next year because “will you" doesn't necessarily imply when only that it hasn't happened yet).

Better to use phrasing people are used to: “Can/may I have your number?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gizmo4pt8
Gizmo4pt8
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"Do you give me your number" does make sense, just situational. In Duo you have to be mentally creative of every possible setting. I see two people both uncomfortable with dating. After a blind date both nerviously looking at each other on her doorstep. He finally asks her "So what's next? Do you give me your number?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikeyengland

Funny

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChFaseeh

Best reply!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"Do you give me your number?" pide una respuesta objetivo: "¿Me estás dando tu número?".

"¿Me das tu número?" pide el número.

(Pero nadie diría "Do you give me your number?")

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/serguyn

Will you give me your number? ACCEPTED

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tommycecil

Does this sound as blunt in Spanish as it does in English?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnieRooney335

"Can I get" is such poor English. "May I have" is much better. Forgive me, but I am a teacher and it is unfortunate to read poor English given as a response.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I agree that "May I have..." would be more polite, but "can I get" is still standard English. The latter phrase may be more common in different regions. Whether you are a teacher is irrelevant, because you just don't like this particular phrase and are using your credentials to back up your personal preference.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ajpthree
ajpthree
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I believe "may I have" is accepted also - the problem is, in order for this course to be useful to nonnative speakers, they'll have to know that "can I get" is something that is used widely as well (in the US anyway - & probably much more often than the polite alternative)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/philips223709

dats bullshity

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Riich3lle

If it translates to 'CAN you give me your number?' in English, shouldn't the Spanish sentence be, 'Puedes darme tu número?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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In English, when we use "Can you give me your number?" this way, we don't mean "are you able to", we basically mean "please". We could also say "Give me your number?"

In Spanish, and I'm just guessing here, maybe "Puedes" always means "are you able to".

But in general, idiomatic usage doesn't translate literally. We have to translate the meaning, not the words.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

Correct. If you ask in Spanish if they “Can"(poder) you are literally asking if it is in their power to do so, not politely asking them to please do so if they will.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

But to be pedantic, the same is (supposed to be) true in English. When English speakers ask "Can you ...." they are literally asking whether it is possible (i.e., are you able to). When the intent is to make a request, the word is "may," as in, "May I have ...." I completely agree that in common usage, that distinction is quite lost. Nevertheless, it does exist formally.

Personally, I doubt I've ever asked "Can you give me your number" OR "May I have your number." Most likely, I would've blurted out something like, "Hey, let me have your number," while trying (unconvincingly) to sound as casual as possible.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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We should not forget two important elements of language, as "intonation and rythm". These elements do not appear in the written language, but can change the meaning of a sentence completely. They are even more important in the relationship or flirting language.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YvonneLewi1

May I get your number? Would that also be a correct translation?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bobbythekid21

sí, es correcto

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdonayMkAd

Without an interrogative mark, this would mean "You give me your phone number."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

Yes. In Spanish questions and their statement counterparts are exactly the same and can only be distinguished by the punctuation. Yet another thing that probably confuses the poop out of Spanish speakers trying to learn English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theycallmedanni

I thought it was Cual es tu número? Thats what i was always taught

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

That is “what is your number?" It is okay with people you know or for a business transaction, but for asking somebody you just met, you would use the less presumptuous, “Will you give me...?" “What is your number?" assumes you have a right to know. “Will you..." is “I'd like to have it if you're willing to give it"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/acelyaozen

I couldn't understand why "do you give me your number" is accepted as wrong! Is three any explanation for this in English please?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"Do you give me your number?" is an objective question asking whether you are in the process of giving me your number. But it would more normally be said as "Are you giving me your phone number?" (and although that sounds more natural, it's a strange thing to say).

"Me das tu número?" is asking for the phone number.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

In English we ask if they will or if they can (I know, it's strange to ask if they “Can" but it's idiomatic) or we ask “May I have your number?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christa490640

'Do you give me your number' sounds strange. 'Do give me your number' sounds much better. (It sounds like old english, too!)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/datcoolazzmf

Can you say Dame tú numero

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Yes in general, but "da" is the imperative, "Give me your number", a slightly different sentence than this one.

I don't think you can use the imperative in a question. I'm guessing this doesn't make sense grammatically: "¿Dame tu número?"

In English, "Give me your number." is imperative. "Give me your number?" is short for "Will you give me your number?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcioalbe

Do you give me your number isnt accepted. Can I have ia more like puedo ter tu numero. But I am not english native and I know can I have is used to ask other things.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

Right. “Do you give me...?" doesn't really make sense in English. The closest to retaining that structure is, “Will you give me.." In English we are more accustomed to “May I/can I have" which would be “puedo tener" in Spanish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paul.coman

The most frequent expression I've heard in Spanish speaking countries is: "Me pasas tu numero?". Rejected...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nicholas.Brooks

Where the hell is can? Is this just a Spanish phrase that doesn't translate? Please help.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fruhauf

It's just a cultural difference, it literally translates to 'give me your number?'. In English we use verbs like can for politeness and nothing else, in Spanish the language is more 'direct'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

There is no word in the sentence that literally translates to "can." Spanish people use the word "dar" instead. If you want to learn the language, you must stop looking for word-for-word correspondences in every translation. Every language has its own colloquialisms, and they are correct in that language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mika_The_Dog

I wrote can you tell me your phone number. Why isn't it correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

To tell is a different verb than to give.

To give = dar

To tell = contar

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yoyojeet

Why there is no word for can?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

There is, it's just not used in this example. "Will you give me your number?"

Can = poder.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoScozzi

"Do you give me your number" maybe is rude and not so polite... but is it wrong? (I have to study english more or just have to learn good manners?)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Your sentence uses the "simple present" which describes repeated or usual actions. It's not a request for their number, it's asking for information about whether they regularly give you their number (which doesn't really make sense). http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/simplepresent.html

If you asked someone that, they wouldn't think you were rude, but they might not be able to figure out what you meant.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Spanish uses the word "dar" in this sentence. English uses the word "give" in this sentence. The sentiment is the same in each language, but not the literally translated word. The point of this sentence is that each language has its own colloquialisms.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cecily243064

I think it is because it isn't correct grammar

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ldayhoff0908

I don't understand why the wording is ordered as seen. "Me das tu numero?" seems out of order. Why would it not be, "Tu das me tu numero?", or simply "das me tu numero?" (I know I'm missing accents, don't know how to type them with my keyboard). I seem to be getting confused a lot with the sentence structure of questions in spanish. Any help is greatly appreciated.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Here's some good Spanishdict lessons on where to put object pronouns. (Me, I like to skip reading the lessons and just jump straight to the practice quiz, since they give little explanations with each question whether you get it right or wrong. Then I sometimes read the lesson after I finally pass the quiz.)

http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/16

http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/18

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Different languages have different word orders. Spanish puts the objects before the verb, and English puts them after. To get used to thinking this way, every time you read a sentence like "¿Me das tu número?" repeat to yourself: ¿Me das tu número?" literally means "Me give your number" = "Give me your number?" In English, it sounds blunt without a "please," but the use of the familiar "das" probably softens the bluntness in Spanish. Anyone agree?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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I don't think it sounds blunt without a "please" in English. In the context of a flirting conversation, I think "Can I get your number, please?" or "Give me your number, please?" would sound oddly formal and impersonal. In that context, I think "please" would only be added if the question was being asked again after the other person refused to give their number. "Give me your number, pleeeeeeease?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I was thinking more along the lines of "Please give me your number." Questions in English usually start with modal verbs or auxiliary verbs. The omission of "can" is only because this sentence is a translation. Because of its syntactical structure, in fact, it would be in imperative form if it did not end in in a question mark, but urgency and sincerity no doubt come through when the message is delivered in person. What I should have said is that "please" is a good word when you are in doubt, or, as with your example, just plain begging. This is probably why the less literal but more venacular "Can I have your number," was offered as the translation." This last sentence definitely has the same flavor as the Spanish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertTudo2

UK English would be 'may i have'. 'Can i get...' Would be frowned upon as it is technically incorrect. You are asking someone to give you their number, not if you can take it from them.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Even though I am from the States, I also was taught "May I have... ." However, I have heard "Can I get..." all my life. It must be a regional thing. According to the Merrian-Webster Dictionary: 2a : to obtain by concession or entreaty <get your mother's permission to go>

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Von83

Why not "Darme tu numero?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/terry.nycum

Because that verb has been left in the infinitive, unconjugated.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheArgo2

well, "Darme tu numero?"is a verb

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

"Darme tu número" is not a verb - it is a sentence fragment. It means "To give me your number."

Dar is an infinitive verb, as Terry said, and it means "to give," me is an object pronoun, tu is a possessive pronoun meaning "your," and número is a noun meaning "number" or, in this context, "phone number."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/atcontrino

Why is it conjugated as das? If it is "I" who is acting the verb - I get , why is it not Voy?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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The subject is 'you'/tú. The indirect object is 'me', 'me'. 'You give your number to me' 'Tú me das tu número'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/star_gazer1

How would you say, "may i have your number"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elabogado

I decided to try "I get your number?" which seems to be the literal translation and it is wrong. While it's clearly a question and the word "can" should be inserted, isn't the word "can" or "able" actually another word such as puedo?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"I get your number" isn't the literal translation; that would be "(Yo) recibo tu número". In "me das tu número", the verb is "das" which means the subject is "tú", and the "me" is the object.

A literal translation is "Do you give me your number?"

"Can I get your number?" is an idiomatic translation. Another translation that's closer to the Spanish, but less idiomatic in this context, is "Can you give me your number?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elabogado

Thanks but confusing because literally, wouldn't "me" mean me or myself and not you? I see a conflict that I can't resolve, which would be for the sentence to begin as "tú das" instead of "me das".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"me" does mean "me", but "me" is not the one doing the giving. The subject of the sentence is "tú", but in Spanish, you don't have to actually put a subject pronoun, especially if it is implied by the conjugation of the verb. The verb "das" can only be done by "tú".

We can tell that "me" is not the subject because "me" is the object form of "yo".

"Me das tu número?" with the subject pronoun added is "Tú me das tu número?" (You to-me give your number?)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zelkin
Zelkin
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how does this sentence relate to flirting?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ViticellaV
ViticellaV
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A lot. Someone asks for your number so you can talk to them again. For example:

Random person: You're so pretty! that shirt's, like OMG, man, like OMG, you're so hot. Can I have your number? Like O.M.G.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chrisroig

Give him or her a fake number thats what my friend did to three people like 911 or my number or "Get out of my face." : )

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emmastone18

i know right

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DFWilson

First timer in the dating game? Getting someone's number is one of the most essential and useful moves for getting a thing going on... -- unless it's a one-night stand or a bathroom quickie, then you'll find that alcohol and/or cocaine are handy!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spanishmakeup
Spanishmakeup
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Wouldn't the literal translation of this be "Can you give me your number?" ? Since 'das' means 'give' I believe.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

The literal translation uses "do," as in "Do give me your number." However, even though "Do give me your number" is a polite way to request a number, this statement is NOT an English question and, accordingly, is not punctuated with a question mark, as is the Spanish sentence in this exercise and its English translation. Since the inversion of the English emphatic mood auxiliary verb "do" is used for English present tense questions whether or not they are in emphatic mood, sentences in the Spanish present tense must be translated using a modal helping verb such as can, will, or may. "Could, would, and might" are modal verbs reserved for translations of past-tense questions.

La traducción literal usa "do", como en "Do give me your number". Sin embargo, aunque "Do give me your number" es una manera educada de solicitar un número, esta declaración NO es una pregunta en inglés y, en consecuencia, no está puntuada con un signo de interrogación, como es la oración española en este ejercicio y su inglés traducción. Dado que la inversión del verbo auxiliar inglés "do" se usa para las preguntas del presente en inglés, estén o no en estado de ánimo enfático, las oraciones en el tiempo presente en español deben ser traducidas usando un verbo de ayuda modal como can, will, or mayo. "Could, would, y might" son verbos modales reservados para traducciones de preguntas de tiempo pasado.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ricardopasa
ricardopasaPlus
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Would we not normally/ usually say: May I have your number?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jae_woods

Another good pickup line is, : "Oh no! I've lost my number! Can i have your's?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryan329177

My Spanish tutor at uni said something about how blunt people are in Spanish culture, for example at a bar nobody says "Can I please have a beer" they say "una cerveza" and only sometimes say "por favor". So even though literally translated would sound very blunt, it's probably not a big deal when in Spain.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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In the context of talking to someone at a bar, I think it would be odd to say "Can I get your number, please?" Usually we don't ask for somebody's number until there has been at least a little bit of conversation before, and at least in my experience, "please" isn't often used in casual conversation. For me, adding "please" in casual conversation would usually have a nuance of exasperation. Or a nuance of wheedling, "Can I get your number, pleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeease?"

When talking to the bartender, it would be normal to add "please". But if you were in the middle of a longish chat with the bartender, I think it would be normal to just say "Another beer?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfordspanish

According to google translations it's: "Can I have your number?".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/layla907710

How would you say, "can i give you my number?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

You would need to change the object pronoun to second person and the verb to first person. It would be "¿Te doy mi número?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talia563793

Why does it say can i have your PHONE number, when it could just be can I have your number?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Colinlempriere

Oh Yvonne? That is a french as name Yvonne! My little croissant.. Where yo boyfriend at? He gettin you Mike n Ikes? You Like Mike n Ikes? Where yo boyfriend at?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee424663

That execrable modern English expression "can I get ...". Whatever happened to "May I have... "

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee424663

This translation makes me cringe. May I have, please.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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This is officially in the flirting section. "Can I get your number?" is a standard pickup line in North America; I'm not sure about other places.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobloxianGuy

It Just Sounds So Wrong!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nay825366

nice name though

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Onimousper

I wish they had a boy mode and a girl mode.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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We have to learn both what to say and how to understand what someone says to us.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

The phrases we learn should be separated along gender lines? Gender lines are social constructs and learning only those phrases that are "meant" for one's gender would be grossly limiting to everyone's learning. How would that be a helpful feature, and who would get to make the completely subjective determinations about what questions are "right" for each gender?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bobbythekid21

A friend of mine has those (comedy spalsh)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Asporges

Shouldn't it be nombre?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

If you are asking for someone's name, perhaps, but this isn't the typical sentence construction for name-asking.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Asporges

Right, nombre and numero, got them confused

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelWhi215178

"Can I get your number" sounds a bit stupid in English. Isn't it better to say "have"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
LICA98
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not really - -

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NailahM93

So could I say, "Puedo tengo tu numero?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

No. You can't have two conjugated verbs together like that. Just as in English, you would need an infinitive to make the phrase make sense. Your sentence reads, "Can I I have your number?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NailahM93

Ohh. So like "Puedo tener to numero," then?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryWhite155177

I put can i gst your number and it marked it as wrong because i didnr put phone number.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JordySwinn

If das means get, what does dime mean?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

"Das" does not mean get. It means "you give."

"Can I get your number?" is not the best translation for this sentence. The literal translation is "Will you give me your number?" but I suppose "Can I get...?" sounds more casual, by Duo's judgement.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Misnervios
Misnervios
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It means tell me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alligator582966

Dummies at duolingo, it is a present tense, it is not conditional tense. Wake up bastardos.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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This sentence is in the "idioms" or maybe "flirting" category. Whichever, the point is to learn the idiomatic way to say this whole sentence, not to translate it word for wordl

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bullyjoel

I asked to a guy once and he said um what? and i was like never mind

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adriel16868

I typed "can i get you number?" And got it wrong becaus i fogot the "r"

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

That's because "you" is a legitimate English word, which means that Duo doesn't recognize it as a typo, but as an incorrect translation. Had you typed "youe" or "yout" instead, Duo probably would have accepted it but pointed out that you had an error in your response. Instead it thought that you mistranslated "tu" as "you." Marking you wrong for this mistake is perfectly logical.

Do not get upset at a program that is trying to teach you a new language if you can't be bothered to proofread your answers before submitting them.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hermione112206

you could say this to your friend to

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GarethJone165033

The word phond is not mentioned

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chrisroig

I dont get it I am a Spaniard and I got it wrong by saying it>:(

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/F4LC0N3

Why is "will you give me your numer" marked wrong?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yahoo3579

Duolingo is being very forward with me. It's refusing my refusals!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolie.kran

I am confused with this lesson; it is just unscrambling the English words. If given the phrase in English, and asked to construct the sentance in Spanish, it would at least be helpful and challenging.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GavinOstrowski

yeet all over you

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adriel16868

"Can i get you number?? ☎" is wrong

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarlosSebas1234

YEAH ITS FREE, 6676270980VAYAYCHINGUEASUMADRE

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KenjiRohn

I got this wrong. Who else did.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdamScott794079
AdamScott794079
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Esperanto flirting was poetic this is just go out with me, give me your number. Dating, not flirting.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria415107

This is just really frustrating. Whenever i click the word to see what the actual meaning of it, nada. ugggghh do you expect me to memorize this? I can't even flirt that much in english and this. Kidding, I just wanna learn.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DFWilson

The sentence could be misleading, because the verb "dar" means "to give" , not "to get/receive", which affects sentence grammar, such as, verb conjugation, pronoun usage, and semantics... I understand the exercises are designed to be more colloquial and idiomatic, but I find it more useful to learn the literal translation and apply the idiom myself, that way there is no confusion when using these words in other contexts... What you guys think?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChFaseeh

Best way to learn is to use it on daily basis. Let's try that in public!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GoodGuy2017

The challenges are really repetitive

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kaz10938

That is one big sentits

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UmerFasieB

The real reason why I'm learning Spanish

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CodyPhilli3

Its too easy when you give me all the words needed. I can figure out the sentence without knowing spanish

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShilohSkel

When I put can I get your number and can I get your phone number they are both right. What is going on?

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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If you mean that Duolingo marked them both right, I think that's good. In this context, "number" and "phone number" mean the same thing.

2 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heartegg

Hey I just met you And this is crazy But here's my number So call me maybe

That was exactly what I was thinking when I saw this.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xxMobsta
xxMobsta
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"Can I get your number?" should be accepted aswell.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eastdoesspanish

"No" REJECTED

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BigAwesome7

can I get your number (wink, wink)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyanJeffer4

I put, "Can I get your number?"... which should be right, but it corrected to "phone number". I can't help but feel either should be acceptable.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielSchm815094

could not agree more Arpechal

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/7thNitrogen

Almost typed can i get your boyfriend lol

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nay825366

Why is it not "Puedo obtener su número de teléfono"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sheep440354

I said can i get your number why do i need phone it means the same thing

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theSpanishLearn

I think duo has been taking lessons from Special Agent Anthony DiNoseo (NCIS)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yusuf130288

No duolingo, I don't give my number too strangers

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_M_M_.
_M_M_.
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The literal translation of this question is: "Are you giving me your phone number?"

That's certainly a form of question we use in English, and the Spanish simple present can be translated into the English present progressive (even though duo often avoids that translation).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KCarrington

Can i also say " quiero tu numero" or is that too blunt lol

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/atoopan

there is not the verb can in that phrase !!!!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GarethJone165033

There is no need to use the word phone in the English translation. It was not used in the Spanish example!!! This is just one of the reasons why this app really pisses me off!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GarethJone165033

I wrote "CanI get your phone number" but was marked down!!!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alligator582966

When duolingo has it wrong, why do i have to write your stupidity to be able to continue? Wake up basura.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alligator582966

Are you happy duolingo, i wrote your stupidity to continue. Miserable cornios.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jihel5
Jihel5
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I usually have to be very careful when translating to proper English, so many correct translations sound awkward. Surprised with this one and got it wrong!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chantal646972

If you used Google translate is sometimes not correct and Spanish has its rules

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chantal646972

Spanish has rules

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FireCrescent
FireCrescent
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"Can i get yo number? Can i have it?" Think of that old sketch and that's what this means

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chrisroig

855-623-8585

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JewelFazbear

Bruh XD

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chrisroig

Giv

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JewelFazbear

Nope XD

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SavvyBanana

PLAYA!!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ad_burke

Is this strictly in the form of a "pick up" line? I mean, I've used this phrase in English for making new (platonic) friends and for business purposes.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ngarrang
ngarrang
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So, literally read "You give me your number?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Misnervios
Misnervios
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It should be may not can.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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You mean "May you give me your number?" That sounds very strange.

"Can you give me your number?" is a very common thing to say.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Misnervios
Misnervios
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Many colloquialisms sound "right" but aren't. I am not talking about that here. Can means "the ability to" while may means "permission". The correct way to say it is: May I have your number? :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Oops, you're right. I got the sentence wrong. It's not "Can you give me", it's "Can/may I get".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee424663

Never! Very ugly English. May I have.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jason196500

Has anyone put "Can I get your phone?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

How would this possibly be a valid translation? Although people routinely use the word "number" to mean "phone number," "phone" and "number" are two completely different words with two completely different meanings.

Unless you live in a region where people routinely say, for example, "Jennie has my phone" in place of "Jennie has my phone number," this is like asking if the word "pencil" can be translated in place of the word "sharpener." No, it cannot.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelR.18

I was in peru for 2 years and am quite fluent in the spanish language and i know that not everything translates nicely, but the english translation is just plain wrong...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kennedy311464

To be said to a very sexy Spaniard

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JordySwinn

If das means get, what does dime mean?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clone9

I'm suprised it doesn't take what is your number.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

That would be using a completely different verb (and also omitting a bunch of words)

What is your number? = ¿Cuál es tu número? (Verb: ser)

Will you give me your number = ¿Me das tu número? (Verb: dar)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eilenora

i wrote can you give me your # and it was wrong

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

I wouldn't expect Duo to recognize the pound sign as a legitimate word.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdeebHamad

This needs to change. I got it wrong because I spelled you're instead of your. Here it is used as possessive correct? I believe I was right.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"You're" is a contraction of "you are". "your" is the possessive.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Moohasha

English words that end in 're are never possessive. You're, they're, etc are contractions with the word "are". "Your" is the correct word to use in this context.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sstark1

Digits are the same thing as numbers, this website is a scam, go to lego.com

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

But it is not colloquial to use "digits" for the word "numbers" when you are asking for a telephone number in English. Besides being a mathematical term for the word "numbers," the English word "digit" can also refer to a toe or finger.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

Although I can't get behind the flippancy of sstark's comment, and I wouldn't fight to have Duolingo accept it as an answer, I have definitely heard people refer to a person's phone number as his or her "digits," and would definitely say that it is a colloquialism.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarlosSebas1234

CALLECE A LA VERGA

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bobbythekid21
5 months ago