https://www.duolingo.com/Ryan-31

What are the differences between the reference levels for European Languages (CEFR)?

Ryan-31
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Hi,

I have seen some people on Duolingo talking about the reference levels for languages (A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, C2).

Could someone tell me what the differences are between the levels, and explain what they might be able to do at that level?

Thanks!

P.S. What level would a native speaker be...C2? And how far can I get with Duolingo?

2 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/garpike
garpike
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A native speaker would not have a 'level' as the levels apply only to non-native learners. I should think at least some native speakers wouldn't meet the C2 criteria anyway (I've met plenty of native English speakers whom I'd certainly not describe as 'expressing themselves spontaneously, very fluently and precisely, differentiating finer shades of meaning even in the most complex situations').

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrandaUrso

Just goes to show, to communicate you don't need such a high level! No need to memorize every word in the language of ones choice as long as they can effectively communicate what they're thinking. =]

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/buenotc
buenotc
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That's because linguistic competence and grammatical competence doesn't need to go hand in hand to a great degree. Linguistic competence can be acquired from the home and grammatical competence can be acquired from schooling. With linguistic competence the rules of the language can be bent to a great degree but still maintaining the bonds of communication. E.g Why you tripping son? Don't be sweating that beef. It ain't cool. That dude be wilding on grass.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrandaUrso

Don't worry about it playa, he chill. Make tracks back to his house ya dig? And let him sleep it off.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thegods14
thegods14
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_European_Framework_of_Reference_for_Languages

Within this article is a very detailed list of what each one signifies. I think Duo can get you to B1 or so. You'll need more resources and lots of outside practice to attain the higher levels of proficiency.

Pleasant tidings!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmonsch

See for a description of each level: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_European_Framework_of_Reference_for_Languages#Common_reference_levels

Duolingo gets you to around A2/B1. However, you will not be able to speak well at that level without practicing with someone.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Duo alone will get you A2/B1, better in reading than in conversing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lelieblad

I'd say if you used Duolingo alone, you'd get to maybe A2 overall and B1 in reading at most. I'd rate myself at A2 in Dutch at the moment.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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I'd say that most native speakers would be somewhere between C1 and C2, with the more educated and eloquent ones (but certainly not all of them) at the C2 level.

2 years ago
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