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https://www.duolingo.com/Andrealphus

Would a "talk dirty"esque lesson ruin Duolingo as a family safe site?

Andrealphus
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I have a book called "Talk Dirty: French" or something along those lines. It introduces verlans, rude slang, abbreviations that go past the "j'aime", and other such grammar faux pas that people still use. I think they should do something like that but make it clear what it is. I find that proper English feels like a foreign language to some Americans, and I'm sure it's the same in French. And though parts of it are racist or hateful, you should know a word for if you get called it or hear it. It helps to decide who you want to trust in your foreign trip.

I don't necessarily know that a lesson on how to seduce your partner or the names of their naughty bits is needed, but one cannot forget that the way a language is used is by far it's most important component. People do use language to talk about sex and call each other names. I don't know that curse words would be needed to know. Knee-jerk type yells when somebody is in pain or upset tend to be rather... universally recognizable. Tell me what y'all think.

4 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AlexSoupy
AlexSoupyPlus
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I see where you're coming from... but I think because Duolingo is used in schools a lot and other more sensitive locations this would possibly limit their audience. Limiting the audience for a site like Duolingo is something they really have to try and avoid since they rely on Crowdsourcing in order to exist. If you remove parts of that crowd it doesn't work. So though I completely agree that it is important to learn how a language is actually used. I don't think that it would make sense for Duolingo to be the place for some of those components to be taught.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrealphus
Andrealphus
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You make a very valid point. I was thinking that maybe it should be added as an extra course, that way in school type situations they could just not be allowed to unlock that lesson. A lot of people use Duolingo as their primary and even only language source.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexSoupy
AlexSoupyPlus
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Yeah, but it all comes down to reputation. it's marketing right. not having the content doesn't present an issue per say, but having the content would at the very least create significant work to be done by the team, and emails from concerned parents or teachers. It's easier how it is now where they don't have to state that this section is locked to those under 18 or whatever, it'd be tough to regulate right. A parent right now can let their kid go wild, but some parents if they found out that they would have to do something to create a parental control would sooner just drop duo lingo as an aid for their child, even just knowing that the site has inappropriate content on it somewhere. There was some backlash when duo lingo first signed up with Buzzfeed for that reason.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrealphus
Andrealphus
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Honestly you couldn't be more right and that is kind of annoying. I know they couldn't go full on with the curse words and etcetera, but at least a few minor insults or things like Quebec's "Tabernack!" to express anger though it just means "church." And verlans wouldn't kill anybody(apart from the more racist parts) because it's pretty much just pit latin used on a wider scale.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hdcanis
hdcanis
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Don't know about talking dirty but knowing some of the major swear words of varying harshness, some general insults etc would be useful. But then again, I have already picked up a couple by reading some comics in French (and in casual settings, bilingual friends are also quite happy to teach some colourful phrases...I know basically no Italian except a number of swear words...)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ryan5

There are other ways to learn slang and such. The important thing is, one should know if they are swearing etc. But such nuances on how to use and not use such language would be difficult to do in duolingo's current format. Additionally, it there is a lot of cultural context to this. for example: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4LjDe4sLER0 This kind of depth, I think is beyond what duolingo can do.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tinnmel
tinnmel
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Duolingo is designed to teach you how to speak a language, not what to say. If you want to learn words not found on doulingo, you can consult a dictionary. And we all should be expanding our vocabulary beyond what doulingo offers.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrealphus
Andrealphus
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It isn't that basic. A dictionary doesn't always give you the proper context and slang meaning of the words. In fact; it usually doesn't.

4 years ago