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https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

Verbo Del Dia (Auténtico) - 20 de Diciembre de 2013

CAMINAR (to walk) - use it in a sentence, in any form

Yo camino a mi trabajo todo los dias, desde que mi coche murió

4 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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*"Camino a mi trabajo todos los días ya que mi coche murió" although I don't know if "morir" would be the right verb here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejandroR666
AlejandroR666
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you'de be understood but "morir" doesn't fit here, or maybe try adding "mi coche se murió" or "mi carro/coche/auto/automovil se averió"... And easy guys, both ways sound OK...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

"And easy guys, both ways sound OK"

Samsta corrects me when I am wrong, which is fine. But I am getting the sense he "corrects" me when I don't say something how he expects, even though it may not be technically wrong. But i don't know enough spanish to make that distinction... yet.

I appreciate samsta's help

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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I'm sorry if it seems that way. I'll stop trying to correct you if you would prefer it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

no need to be sorry. Correct me, I appreciate it. But if comes to where we are splitting hairs, that gets a little annoying.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

desde que is an idiom which means "since"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

that link basically says Desde, or Desde Que (since) is correct how I used it. Ya Que doesn't seem correct, or am I missing something?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickM98
NickM98
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Ya que is right. Desde que isn't ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

no, not exactly

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickM98
NickM98
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I mean in this context. "Camino a mi trabajo todos los días desde que mi coche murió" would mean "I've been walking to my job every day since my car broke"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyNZ

Can you elaborate a little. (I'm confused but that's not unusual for me...) How did the "walking... every day" become past tense in the translation to English? Is that a result of using "desde que"? Clearly there's something I'm not understanding.

Thanks in advance. :-)

(BTW: everyday is an adjective meaning "usual", or "normal" (everyday low prices, everyday clothes etc) and shouldn't be confused with every day which means "each day" - but if it was merely a typo, ignore that correction)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickM98
NickM98
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Remember, translations aren't always the same ;) And yes, it was kind of an effect of the desde que. Anyway, it isn't very natural, it was just to explain that they weren't the same.

And yes, it was a typo xD

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

"I mean in this context. "Camino a mi trabajo todos los días desde que mi coche murió" would mean "I've been walking to my job every day since my car broke"

exactamente

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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NickM98 is a native speaker, just in case you didn't know.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickM98
NickM98
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Sorry to say it this way, I don't want to have an argument. But I think that, between speaking, listening, reading, writing and thinking in a language, and having studied it for a time, there's a little difference. Your sentence, though right, doesn't have the same meaning, and it isn't very natural either.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StriderCid

Me gusto caminar en la mañana.

4 years ago