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  5. "W kwietniu jem mięso."

"W kwietniu jem mięso."

Translation:I eat meat in April.

January 23, 2016

23 Comments


[deactivated user]

    Try to eat meat in April in Poland and you will have a bad time!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kliphph

    I think Roman Catholics abstain from meat only on Ash Wednesday and every Friday of Lent, so I would assume they could eat meat the other days of April...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eannaoc

    In Ireland Roman Catholics only abstain from meat on Good Friday, no other days so far as I've ever seen


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshTheDennis

    Why does "kwiecień" change to "kwietniu" here? Does using the "w" before it require a case change?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

    Yes, "w" meaning "in, inside" takes Locative. There are also situations when "w" takes Accusative.

    Compare: "mam złamaną kość w nodze" (I have a broken bone in my leg, Locative), and "uderzyłem się w nogę" (I hit myself in the leg, Accusative. not even sure if "in" is the right preposition here).

    Oh, btw: in April, in October etc. take Locative, but days of the week and the word "weekend" are exceptions and take Accusative despite using "w".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshTheDennis

    That makes sense, thanks very much!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maciejbubniak

    do they not capitalize the months


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

    No we don't.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexandruNatu

    Why is 'In April I'm eating meat' accepted as correct?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

    Because jeść in Polish is like many other verbs, that can mean both "I eat" and "I am eating".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Remy_R

    Strange, It wasn't accepted for me


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Remy_R

    I didn't put an apostrophe in 'I'm' though, so maybe it was that.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

    We like sentences that are a bit strange semantically (especially using animals as the subject of the sentence), but well, there's also grammar :) And I was told by a native, that using Present Continuous makes very little sense here.

    Quote 1: "It's weird... It's like I've known you as a vegetarian for a long time and you're telling me that you're going to start eating meat in April."

    Quote 2: "The other possibility I can think of is that you're going to eat nothing but meat in April, which is also very unlikely and very weird, besides being unhealthy. :)"

    And if I really meant one of those, I'd phrase it differently in Polish ;)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

    As far as I know, that would be a very strange sentence in English, so we do not accept it here.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Remy_R

    I've encountered sentences like "my dog has a hat" before, so I thought strange sentences were the norm on here ;) immery seems to think its grammatically correct, thats why I'm confused.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Addicted359

    From kwiecień becomes kwietniu? Well I need to be more focused on remembering polish vocabularies


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisFlynn12

    If I were to say "Jem mięso w kwietniu" would this also be correct, but rather stressing the month rather than the action?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

    Yes, exactly.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DorothyRoholt

    "I am eating meat in April". was not accepted, and I read your explanation for why you think using continuous would be unusual. But If one was previously not eating , and then was to begin, would it not be possible to use continuous? And after mentioning it to a friend, and the friend answered "in May?", and the speaker corrected, saying, "I'm eating meat in April." I don't find that an awkward sentence to be using continuous.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

    OK, let's accept it. Added.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexandruNatu

    I completely agree, but usually when both are correct it just tells you Another translation, but keep your as correct. For me it was a mistake


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vytah

    There are usually dozens, if not hundreds of accepted translations for a sentence. Duolingo can only show you one, chosen as the best one, plus if you actually typed the best one, it can show you another translation chosen by the course creators. From what I've seen, course creators tend to choose the second translation to highlight alternative meanings of the words or multiple correct grammar forms, but not always – things that are trivial and should be understood by then are considered minor variations not worth mentioning. The fact that Polish has only one present tense was taught pretty early.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

    Maybe it is an English language thing? Can you say that in English in any context? If yes , report the answer as correct next time.

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