"Я вижу два трамвая."

Translation:I see two trams.

January 24, 2016

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939

i just learnedsomething.! what wecall " a tramway" or "a tram" in french you call a tramcar in english.. funny. most of the big and medium-sized cities in Europe have them. they came back in force in the last 20 years or so because they don't use fuel (gas-gasoline ) so they don't pollute the air. same is true for the trolleybuses. Even in South America, they have started to build them again. QUITO in Ecuador is a good example but there are many others. It is much more ecological than the normal buses. Same is true for trains ( railways). or metro (underground, tube)

August 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

Growing up in Kiev in the 1970s, electric трамваи were a major mode of transportation.

February 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/petrenko

This course is inconsistent about the translation of я вижу, слышу etc. "I can see…" needs to be added

December 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

"I can see" is more like Я могу видеть. They should be more consistent

December 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/petrenko

I disagree, for the reasons given here:

With verbs of ‘inert perception’ and ‘inert cognition’… there is little difference between being able to do something and actually doing it, so can tends to lose its distinctive modal meaning… With ‘verbs of inert perception’, furthermore, can not only loses its distinctive modal value, but has the additional special function of denoting a state rather than an event. As the Simple Present of these verbs has only an ‘instantaneous’ event meaning… the main difference between… I can see and I see is one of perception as a state versus perception as a (momentary) event

Geoffrey Leech, 'Meaning and the English Verb'

Some courses get this right. "I can see" is always accepted on the Polish course. French and German are pretty much fine.

January 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

He even writes "little difference" himself. There is nothing to disagree. I'm not disagreeing about the English. I'm drawing a direct translation in order to clarify. I can see/I see = Я вижу. But, also, "Он это может видеть," can also translate to "He can see that."

January 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/petrenko

Oh sorry, I misunderstood your post. I was only saying it should be added as an accepted option, not that there's anything wrong with the current version.

January 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/IforGot2

I think streetcars, trams, light rail vehicles, etc should all be correct. I had to find definition of a tram to realize what it was when I translated it with google. In San Francisco CA USA we have multiple types of these but no one calls them 'trams' they are called light-rail vehicles, streetcars, etc...

March 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

In amusement parks, the parking shuttles are frequently referred to as trams. The Universal Studios tour is also on a tram.

March 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/dempl

How do you say "the Tram tracks" in Russian. google translate translation says "Трамвайные пути", but it doesn't sound right to me ;-)

January 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mosfet07

Google is right. The rails themselves are "ре́льсы".

January 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/dempl

So is it ре́льсы or трамвайные пути or you can use both? :-)

January 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mosfet07

"рельс" is a metal bar, "трамва́йные пути́" is a part of the infrastructure of a city. Is this different in Serbian? :)

January 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/dempl

We just use "шине" for tracks themselves (your word for tires, you guys can't get one word right :P ), and we don't have any special expression/word for tram infrastructure (which tells you bit about our trams infrastructure haha)

January 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

Yeah, Russian шины, but pronounced like /шыны/, means "tires."

Google Translates has Russian "шине" as "Bus." I don't know if that's right

July 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Marcel766088

That's cool, it's the same word in German: Schiene

July 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/alkajugl

I am not sure what a "tram" is. I see in the discussion that it has tracks and it is part of the infrastructure of a city. Would it be what in the US is commonly known as a streetcar?

February 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MattHerzog1

A modern version of trolleys (like in San Fran) that ride on rails. Common in europe and russia but not in America

March 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/feyMorgaina

Yes, "streetcar" would be an alternate name. These links should help - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tram and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Streetcars_in_North_America. I was born and raised in a city that has them. All the locals call them "streetcars".

There is also a famous American play called A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Streetcar_Named_Desire).

May 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JackVUL

In the US, it would still be commonly called and known as a tram. Just imagine a few train carriages attached to one overhead rail, and 2 ground rails.

February 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

Alice, Have you ever been to an amusement park, such as Disneyland? A tram is that shuttle (usually open-air not closed-in) that you ride from the parking lot to the park entrance. It doesn't have to run on tracks, but it's implied that a tram rides along a specific, repeated route.

February 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/alkajugl

As I read the Russian sentences we have been given, I think "streetcar" has to be the best translation for the kind that run regularly on city streets. But, yes, I have seen local shuttles that use golf carts or similar vehicles in more limited venues, and I do recognize that these are indeed "trams".

May 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

Streetcar is a good example, but another example, in Kiev, they had actual full-sized busses but that ran under power lines overhead using a giant "fork" on their rooves. These were called трамваи even though they were автобусы in every way except electrical. In English these would be busses, not streetcars.

May 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a

That thing is called a trolleybus in a lot of languages, including English. A lot of places used to have them, and some still do: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trolleybus_usage_by_country.

June 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/alkajugl

Wish I could see Kiev, Leningrad, Moscow... Maybe in another life.

May 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

You can always Google photos and videos, even of Leningrad!

May 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/RussophiliaSux

Assuming your browser has an ad blocker, englishrussia.com has a wealth of photos from all over Russia and the former republics. This includes stuff from the Soviet period. Some of the photos were taken then, but most are new pics of old things, not always still in use.

May 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MAfrica1

In the "Type what you hear" exercise, the big speaker does not sound, but the tourtle speaker sounds rightly.

July 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/lee_livingston

trolley cars is not accepted. I didn't report it as I wasn't certain if in Russia it only refers to the trams on tracks whereas trolley cars can be either rail or wheeled vehicles.

September 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/EdmundMcIntosh

Russia has both sorts of transport - a трамвай has rails, a троллейбус runs on the road, both powered from overhead lines. So I imagine DL wants you to make this distinction.

February 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

Interesting. It's the opposite in the U.S., for the most part. A trolley runs on rails, and a tram runs without. A tram is usually an open-air shuttle at an amusement park that drives people from the parking lot to the park and back. It does not run on regular streets, for the most part.

Trolley https://goo.gl/images/2pqejh

Tram https://goo.gl/images/N1CTCS

February 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/malchikrene

I dont understand, why два трамвая is not in accusative?

December 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

It's in the genitive, singular case because it's "two of a tram," два трамвая. Quantity 2, 3, or 4 (or 62, or 33, or 54--any number ending in 2, 3, 4 except 12, 13, 14) use this construction.

Quantity 5-20 and every other quantity ending in 5-9 and 0 use the gentive, plural case, "five of trams," пять трамваев.

December 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

The word два is in accusative. It's just that accusative = nominative in this case.

February 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/onespeck

Not correct!? "I am seeing two trams."

January 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

It is not incorrect, but it would me more common to say, "I see," instead of "I'm seeing"

January 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr_Thu

Might be a stupid question, but why is there no accusative in this sentence?

October 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/daltojr

Господин берлиоз упал на трамвай (

November 12, 2017
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