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"Matar dois coelhos com uma cajadada só."

Translation:To kill two birds with one stone.

December 20, 2013

45 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elmilio

What would be the literal translation of "cajadada"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fdgero

A blow with a stick (thwack, thump, knock, clout, etc.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dusics95

German: Klatsche (Zwei Fliegen mit einer Klatsche schlagen):D Google translate says the English word is "swatter"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fjvenegasb

In Spanish: "Matar dos pájaros de un tiro".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iruxka

In Russia we are killing two rabbits with one shot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kazu553315

In Japanese, isseki nicho 一石二鳥.

一 ichi or one 石 seki or stone 二 ni or two 鳥 cho or birds


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/friendlynaveed

Urdu: Pakistan. ایک تیر سے دو شکار. "Eik teer se do shikar" Two hunts with one arrow


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sajad63

Persian: yek tir o do shikar یک تیر و دوشکار


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/orfeonegro

Also "Zwei Fliegen mit einer Klappe"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kake62773

Is that flies? In Finnish we also kill those, with one strike. Would be awesome if the expression had chopsticks in it but oh weell..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pibolya

Hungarian: kėt legyet egy csapásra (two flies with one hit) :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DriesBrinkman

Dutch: "Twee vliegen in één klap"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilmolleggi

In the more peaceful Italian language (JK, no need to get worked up) we say: "[Acchiappare] due piccioni con una fava" = lit. [To catch] two pidgeons with one fava. But the two birds with one stone variation seems the most frequent one, you can even find it in Japanese: 一石二鳥 isseki nichō (one stone, two birds).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QueenGizzard

For those who ignore what is a "fava", it is a green legume, some sort of big flat bean ;) Our Italian idiomatic expressions are CRUELTY FREE! XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TerraZe

Get two (or more, but usually two) things done at the same time with only one action.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vivisaurus

Yes. We get rabbits, you get birds. =)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lipwig

In my country there is a popular paraphrase of it between the youngs: to have two parties with one bottle of vodka. :)

Which is kinda impossible here, so means extra that the person is a cheapskate, a picareta real.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Georgia793579

In French, your choice, rabbits, birds,... apples: "faire d'une pierre deux coups" (two hits with one stone)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KTKee-EnglishEng

Kill two rabbits with one blow?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shibopshibop

That sounds like a good literal rending of it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amberae3

Is it common to be able to put the word "só" after the noun, as opposed to before it? .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pfeil

Yes. Portuguese is quite liberal in that sense. You can put in many places:
Matar dois coelhos com uma cajadada.
Matar dois coelhos com uma cajadada.
Matar dois coelhos com uma cajadada.
Matar dois coelhos com uma cajadada .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

I prefer using the last option


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wontlookdown

What does so (with an accent, sorry not on an accented keyboard) actually mean? I seen a song called 'Era so jajao' and it was translated as something like 'It was all a (bunch of) lies.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Jajão = conversation/talk to fool/cheat someone. It's not used in PTBR though.

Era só jajão = It was only...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EPOSantos

= Only, Just...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marijke.va1

To kill two flies with one blow ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juhani9

That how Finns say it: Kaksi kärpästä yhdellä iskulla (two flies with one blow). :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gonzaloveg

Matar dos pájaros de un tiro. To kill two birds with one gunshot.


[deactivated user]

    For those interested, apparently the "Two birds with one stone" variant of this idiom was initially (I'm assuming) based off of the exploits of Daedalus and Icarus of Greek myth.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carlos478425

    Cajadada só, what does this phrase imply to?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

    It means you use a "cajado" to kill them.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GScottOliver

    2019-12-11 Many thanks, Paulenrique! Now I know that um cajado is a shepherd's crook.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FoghornJLeghorn

    Can i leave the word (to) out and have it still be right


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vinidcali

    Well, matar = to kill, to indicate that the verb is in the infinitive form C:


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/waldyrious

    Not a native English speaker, but reasonably fluent. Wouldn't "kill two birds with the same stone" work as well?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RedJess

    In the UK we would never say "the same stone" only ever "one stone". Of course it makes sense and you'd be understood but... We are a bit lazy with language so the shortest way is the easiest. I'm super lazy so would just say "2 birds 1 stone" as the phrase is well understood.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GScottOliver

    2019-12-11 You see, to use "the same stone" could mean that you used the stone once, then picked it up and used it again. Using "one stone", on the other hand, connotes one shot, one instance.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rayjordi

    What does the "só" word means? Thank you!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique
    • só (adv) = only, just
    • só (adj) = alone

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jack774972

    My wife is a paulista and claims that Brazilians also use "kill two birds with one stone" "matar dois passoros com uma pedra"

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