https://www.duolingo.com/loose-leaf1

What does a language gain from leaving beta?

I came here for Esperanto and loving it, but after trying out french I've noticed that there is a difference between beta and full versions. What exactly would the Esperanto section gain when it shifts from Beta to full, and is there any estimates on when this will happen? (I noticed the progress bar is close to completion.)

2 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/GrandaUrso

It doesn't "Gain" anything from losing beta. The beta designation means that it's getting a certain number of reports from x amount of users in 100. Meaning there's x amount of errors in the course (Either real or suspected). Once the amount of users per 100 reporting exercises gets below 3 (I think) then the course is considered "Stable" and comes out of beta. What you're thinking of as far as trees is TREE 2.0 which is an upgraded tree which Esperanto is currently working on! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/loose-leaf1

Thank you for the clarification. Tre Dankon

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrandaUrso

Estas mia placxo. =)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/no.name.42
no.name.42
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If they plan on building a reverse course they often wait until after the initial course leaves beta; but I don't think that they are planing an English for Esperanto course.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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English for Esperanto would be a great idea :)

There are quite a few people who learned Esperanto because English was too tough. Now it can be the stepping stone to English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/no.name.42
no.name.42
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Duolingo seems to have stopped creating new base languages. Also, given the low number of Esperanto speakers, many of whom already speak English, they can probably reach a larger audience with many other languages.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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My answer was really tongue in cheek, but it would be fun to try it ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jirka92122
jirka92122
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I think this could be an efficient way of creating high quality language courses. 1) Make an esperanto course for all base languages. 2) Then make courses from esperanto to all languages.

We're then talking about complexity of 2n rather than complexity of n^2. That is, if you want to cover 100 languages, you make 200 courses, instead of 10,000 courses.

And yes, of course it is a bit tongue in cheek as well. But in some sense it does make ultimate sense. You pick the easiest to learn language as the intermediary. Right now it seems that this intermediary is English on Duolingo, so for Czech->Spanish you right now have to go Czech->English, English->Spanish. It'd be much easier to go Czech->Esperanto, Esperanto->Spanish if you are only interested in Spanish (or Spanish and Esperanto of course) :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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I think that was part of the original "auxiliary language" idea. It doesn't have to be the goal, just a way to facilitate communication, even if it doesn't end in Esperanto.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrandaUrso

I certainly can appreciate and enjoy the idea.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jirka92122
jirka92122
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Yup. It's a bit lesser goal than having Esperanto be the international language, in this scenario it is a possibly throwaway language simply a step on the way to learn the language you want. Though the side product would be that everybody would know Esperanto :)

The idea is definitely applied in more controlled contexts. E.g. in computer language compilation. GCC for example does a two step translation. First from the language that the human types into a common intermediary. This "frontend" only needs to know what humans mean, but it doesn't know how to program the machine. Then there are the "backend"s which don't know any of the human oriented programming languages, but know how to program this or that actual machine. That way GCC can compile a lot of languages that run on a lot of different computers.

2 years ago
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